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Full text of "General catalog : announcements and faculty list ..."

Vol. Ill 



BULLETIN 



No. 2 



Iowa State College 

Agriculture 
and the Mechanic Arts 



CATALOG NUMBER 

MARCH, 190$ 
Ames. Iowa 



Published by the Iowa State College of Agriculture and the Mechanic 
Arts, Ames, Iowa., Quarterly in March, June, September and December, 
Each Year. Admitted at the Post Office at Ames, Iowa., as Second 
Class Matter. 













* 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
LIBRARY 






Class 

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Book Volume 









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BULLETIN 

...OF THE... 

IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



.OF.., 



AGRICULTURE 



...AND... 



THE MECHANIC ARTS 



CATALOG NUMBER 

MARCH, 1905 



SCIENCE WITH PRACTICE" 



CALENDAR— 1905 1906 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S 


M 


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w 


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F|S 


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FEBRUARY 


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MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


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APRIL 


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CALENDAR FOR 1905-1906 



1905. 

Second Semester of College Year began Thur., Jan. 19 

Easter Vacation Thur. night to Mon. night, April 20-24 

Memorial Day Tues., May 30 

Baccalaureate Address Sunday, June 4 

Annual Alumni Meeting Wed., Thur., June 7-8 

Commencement Thur., June 8 

Good Roads School June 12-17 

1905-6. 

First Semester of College Year begins Thur., Aug. 31 

Entrance Examinations Thur.-Fri., Aug. 31-Sept. 1 

Recitations begin Mon., Sept. 4 

Thanksgiving Vacation Thur., Nov. 30 

Term Examinations Dec. 20-21 

Short Courses in Stock and Grain Judging and Domestic 

Science Jan. 1-13 

Second Semester of College year begins Thur., Jan. 18 

Registration and Classification Days Thur.-Sat, Jan. 18-20 



X 23S 



OFFICERS OF THE COLLEGE 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 

Hon. J. B. Htjngerford, Carroll Chairman 

E. W. Stanton, Ames Secretary 

Herman Knapp, Ames Treasurer 

W. A. Helsell, Odebolt Financial Secretary 

Benjamin Edwards, Ames Custodian 

members of the board. 

Ex-officio — Hon. Albert B. Cummins, Governor of Iowa. 
Ex-officio — Hon. John P. Riggs, Superintendent of Public In- 
struction. 

Term Expires 

First District — Hon. H. M. Letts, Columbus Junction .1910 

Second District — Hon. Vincent Zmunt, Iowa City 1910 

Third District — Hon. E. A. Alexander, Clarion 1908 

Fourth District— Hon. E. J. Orr, Waukon 1910 

Fifth District — Hon. W. R. Moninger, Marshalltown 1906 

Sixth District — Hon. W. O. McElroy, Newton 1908 

Seventh District — Hon. W. K. Boardman, Nevada 1906 

Eighth District— Hon. G. S. Allyn, Mt. Ayr 1910 

Ninth District — Hon. James H. Wilson, Adair 1908 

Tenth District — Hon. J. B. Htjngerford, Carroll 1906 

Eleventh District — Hon. W. J. Dixon, Sac City 1906 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

GROUP I. 

Finance Committee: Gov. Cummins, Trustees McElroy, Hunger- 
ford, Alexander, Allyn and Dixon. 

Building Committee: Trustees Dixon, Hungerford, Letts; addi- 
tional members, Moninger and Wilson. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 7 

GROUP II. 

Committee on Agriculture, Horticulture, Experiment Station and 

Veterinary Science: Trustees Letts, Boardman, Moninger, 

Allyn, Orr and Gov. Cummins. 
Committee on Engineering Departments and Physics: Trustees 

Zmunt, Supt. Riggs, Orr, McElroy and Dixon. 
Committee on College Hospital and Sanitary Arrangements: 

Supt. Riggs, Trustees Zmunt and Wilson. 

GROUP III. 

Committee on Faculty and Courses of Study: Trustees McElroy, 
Supt. Riggs, Hungerford, Dixon, Alexander and Zmunt. 

Committee on College Lands and Investments: Trustees Allyn, 
Gov. Cummins and Moninger. 

Committee on Rules: Trustees Orr, Zmunt and McElroy. 

GROUP IV. 

Committee on Scientific Departments: Trustees Alexander, 
Riggs, Allyn, Orr and Boardman. 

Committee on Literary Departments and Library: Trustees Wil- 
son, Zmunt, Supt. Riggs, Boardman and Alexander. 

Committee on Public Grounds and Assignment of Rooms: Trus- 
tees Hungerford, Zmunt and Letts. 

Committee on Bonds: Trustees Moninger and Wilson. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



ALBERT BOYNTON STORMS, A. M., D. D., LL. D., 

President. Dean of the Division of Science. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc., LL. D., 

Dean of the Junior College, Professor of Mathematics and Economic 

Science. 

CHARLES FRANKLIN CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Dean of the Division of Agriculture, Director of the Experiment 

Station. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Dean of the Division of Engineering, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

JOHN H. McNEIL, V. M. D„ 
Dean of Veterinary Division, Professor of Veterinary Medicine and 

Surgery. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E„ 

Vice Dean of the Division of Engineering, Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering. 

PERRY GREELEY HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Vice Dean of the Division of Agriculture, Professor of Agronomy. 

WILLARD JOHN KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Vice Director of the Experiment Sttation, Professor of Animal 
Husbandry. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer Veterinary Division. 

Hon. JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

Lecturer in Agriculture. 

Genekal JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. S., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E„ M. Sc, 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 



10 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering. 

ALVIN BUELL NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY ELIJAH SUMMERS, B. S., 
Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 

Professor of Public Speaking. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 

Professor of Dairying. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Psychology. College Chaplain. 

WILLIAM HENRY STEVENSON, A. B., 

Professor of Soils. 

CLARENCE JANNE ZINTHEO, B. S., 

Professor of Farm Mechanics. 

MISS GEORGETTA WITTER, B. L., 

Professor of Domestic Economy. 

RICHARD CORNELIUS BARRETT, M. A., LL. B., 

Professor of Civics. 

SPENCER A. BEACH, M. S., 

Professor of Horticulture. 

ARTHUR THOMAS ERWIN, M. S. A., 

Associate Professor of Horticulture in charge of Department. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. B., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ag., Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Economic Science. 

LEWIS EUGENE ASHBAUGH, B. S., Ph. B., 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

WILLIAM JOHN RUTHERFORD, B. S. A., 

Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

WALTER A. STUHR, D. V. M., 

Associate Professor of Histology, Pathology and Therapeutics. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 11 

FREDERICK ALAN PISH, M. E. in E. E., 

Acting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

MRS. MARIAN H. KILBOURNE, B. L., 

Dean of Women. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 
Librarian. 

JOHN PIPER WATSON, 

Physical Director. 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc, M. D., 

College Physician. 

PRANK JORDAN RESLER, B. Ph., 

Director of Music, Vocalist. 

HERBERT WILLIAM DOW, B. S. in M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

MISS LOLA ANN PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

*MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Assistant Professor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 

Assistant Professor in English. 

EDWARD EVERETT BUGBEE, E. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, M. M. E., 

Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering. 

IRA ABRAHAM WILLIAMS, B. Sc, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

CARL WARREN GAY, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

JOSEPH EDWARD GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

PRANK WILLIAM BOUSKA, M. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology. 

CHRISTIAN LARSEN, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Dairying. 



'Granted leave of absence. 



12 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

PRANK FRENCH, B. C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering-. 

LEONARD SILVANUS KLINCK, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Farm Crops. 

PAUL SKEELS PEIRCE, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

WINFRED F. COOVER, A. M., 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

HUGH POTTER BAKER, B. S., M. F., 

Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

FREDERICK R. AHLERS, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Obstetrics. 

LESLIE M. HURT, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Physiology and Sanitary Science. 

IRA OBED SHAUB, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Soils. 

ADOLPH SHANE, B. S. in E. E., 

Acting- Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

EZRA CORNELIUS POTTER, 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

MRS. MARY ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 
Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

ELBERT BARRETT TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN GERTRUDE REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE ISABEL NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

FRANK WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS FRANCES MARIETTA WILLIAMS, 

Instructor in Domestic Art. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMING, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 13 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sd, 
Instructor in History. 

MARK PERKINS CLEGHORN, B. Sc. in E. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

JOHN EDGAR STEWART, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

WARD MURRAY JONES, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

CLARENCE ROY McKINNEY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

JOSEPH ALBERT KNESCHE, 

Instructor in Forge and Foundry. 

WAYNE DINSMORE, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

JESSE GREENVILLE HUMMEL, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Machine Shop. 

MISS HARRIETTE KELLOGG, A. M., 

Instructor in Botany. 

MISS FLORENCE ANN LUCAS, 
Instructor in French. 

MISS EFFIE ALENE WHITE 
Instructor in English. 

MISS ROSE ABEL, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS RUTH MORRISON, A. B., 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

JOHN F. TRAVIS, A. M., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

FRANK GILBERT ALLEN, B. S., 
Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

MISS BLANCHE ISABEL THOBURN, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MOORE, Ph. M., 
Instructor in English. 

MISS LISLE McCOLLOM, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 



14 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

MISS SYBIL M. LENTNBR, B. S., 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 

MISS WINIFRED R. TILDEN, B. A., 

Instructor in Physical Culture. 

THOMAS HARRIS MacDONALD, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering and Assistant in charge of Good 
Roads Investigation. 

HARRY M. BAINER, M. S. A., M. Sc, 

Instructor in Field Engineering, Department of Farm Mechanics. 

DORA GILBERT TOMPKINS, A. M., 

Instructor in English. 

EDWARD ELIAS LITTLE, ML S. A., 

Assistant Horticulturist. 

GEORGE IRVING CHRISTIE, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Soils. 

MISS OLIVE STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 

WILLIAM WESLEY SMITH, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

JOHN ALEXANDER CONOVER, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

J. W. JONES, 

Assistant in Agronomy. 

JOHN HENRY LAWTON, 

Assistant in Mechanical Drawing. 

DAILY MARTIN CURL, 

Assistant in Forge and Foundry. 

EDWARD MERRITT SPANGLER, 

Assistant in Pattern Shop. 

CORTES JOHNSON, B. S. in C. E., 

Assistant in Civil Engineering. 

MARGARET B. STANTON, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

ETHYL CESSNA, B. Sc, 
Assistant in History. 

C. E. BARTHOLOMEW, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Zoology. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 15 

ROBERT EARLE BUCHANAN, B. Sc., 

Assistant in Botany. 

ESTELLE DENNIS FOGEL, B. A., B. Sc, 

Assistant in Botany. 

EFFIE MAE McKIMM, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM ALFRED BEVAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Farm Mechanics. 

ERNEST CHRISTIAN GASSER, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

C. W. RUBEL, B. S. A., 

Graduate Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

A. W. ATHERTON, 

Student Assistant in Farm Mechanics. 

HOWARD SAMUEL FAWCETT, 
Student Assistant in Botany. 

MISS VIOLA CHAMBERS, 

Student Assistant in Mathematics. 

FRANK HASKIN RICKER, 

Student Assistant in Machine Shop. 

WALTER E. REULING, 

Student Assistant in Machine Shop. 

HORACE LYMAN BLACKMAN, 

Student Assistant in Mechanical Drawing. 

FLORA DELL PADDOCK, 

Student Assistant in Domestic Science. 

HAROLD MARSHALL HOWARD, 

Student Assistant in English, 

M. L. BOWMAN, 

Farm Foreman. 

JULIUS ERDMANN, 
Gardner. 



16 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



ALBERT BCVNTON STORMS, A. M, D. D., LL. D., 

President. 

CHARLES FRANKLIN CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director. 

WILLARD JOHN KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Animal Husbandry. 

PERRY GREELEY HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Agronomy. 

CLARENCE JANNE ZINTHEO, B. S., 

Farm Mechanics. 

WILLIAM HENRY STEVENSON, A. B., 

Soils. 

WILLIAM JOHN RUTHERFORD, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

LEONARD SYLVANUS KLINCK, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Agronomy. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. Ac, M. S., Ph. D., 

Botanist. 

HENRY ELIJAH SUMMERS, B. S., 
Entomologist. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 

Dairying. 

ARTHUR THOMAS ERWIN, M. S. A., 

Acting Horticulturisc. 

LOUIS G. MICHAEL, B. Sc, 

Chemist. 

EDWARD ELIAS LITTLE, M. S. A., 

Assistant Horticulturist. 

WAYNE DINSMORE, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 17 

PRANK WILLIAM BOUSKA, M. Sc. A., 

Dairy Bacteriologist. 

CHRISTIAN LARSEN, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairying. 

ELMER S. GARDNER, 

Photographer. 

WILLIAM HENRY OGILVIE, 

Bulletin Editor. 

ROBERT EARLE BUCHANAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant Botanist. 

HARRIETTE S. KELLOGG, A. M., 

Assistant in Botany. 

CHARLES ELMER ELLIS, B. S. A., M. S. A., 

Assistant Chemistry. 

GEORGE IRVING CHRISTIE, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Soils. 

WILLIAM WESLEY SMITH, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

HUGH POTTER BAKER, B. S., M. F., 

Forester. 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 
Artist. 



18 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



A. B. STORMS, A. M., D. D., LL. D., 

President. 

A. MARSTON, C. E., 

Director and Civil Engineer. 

G. W. BISSELL, M. E., 

Mechanical Engineer. 

L. B. SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 

Electrical Engineer. 

S. W. BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Mining Engineer. 

W. H. MEEKER, M. E., 

Associate Mechanical Engineer. 



HISTORICAL 

LOCATION 

BUILDINGS. GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 



20 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



HISTORICAL 



In 1858 the Legislature of Iowa passed an act to establish 
"A State Agricultural College and Model Farm," to be connected 
with the entire agricultural interests of the State; appointed a 
board of commissioners to buy a farm and erect a college build- 
ing, and elected a board of trustees to select a faculty and organ- 
ize a college. In 1859 a farm of six hundred and forty acres, 
situated near Ames, was purchased for the use of the college. 
The farm now exceeds one thousand acres. 

In 1862 a bill was passed by Congress, entitled, "An act 
donating public lands to the several States and Territories, 
which may provide colleges for the benefit of Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts." 

Section 1 of this act provides that for the support of such 
colleges there be granted "an amount of public land, to be appor- 
tioned to each State in quantity equal to thirty thousand acres 
for each Senator and Representative in Congress to which the 
States are respectively entitled by the apportionment under the 
census of 1860; provided that no mineral lands shall be selected 
or purchased under the provisions of this act." 

Section 4 requires: "That all moneys derived from the sale 
of land aforesaid by the States to which lands are apportioned, 
and from the sale of land script, hereinbefore provided for, shall 
constitute a perpetual fund, the capital of which shall remain 
forever undiminished (except as may be provided for in Section 
fifth of this act), and the interest of which shall inviolably be 
apportioned by each State which may take and claim the benefit 
of this act, to the endowment, support and maintenance of at 
least one college, where the leading object shall be, without 
excluding other scientific and classical studies, and including 
military tactics, to teach such branches of learning as are related 
to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner as the 
Legislature of the State may provide, in order to promote the 
liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the 
several pursuits and professions of life." 

Section 5 says: "And be it further enacted, that the grant 
of land and land script hereby authoried, shall be made on the 



HISTORICAL 21 

following conditions, to which, as well as the provisions herein- 
before contained, the previous assent of the several States shall 
be signified by legislative acts; first, if any portion of the fund, 
invested as provided by the foregoing section, or any portion of 
the interest thereon, shall, by any action or contingency, be 
diminished or lost, it shall be replaced by the State to which it 
belongs, so that the capital of the fund shall remain forever 
undiminished; and the annual interest shall be regularly applied 
without diminution to the purposes mentioned in the fourth sec- 
tion of this act, except that a sum not exceeding ten per centum. 
upon the amount received by any State under the provisions 
of this act, may be expended for the purchase of land for sites 
or experimental farms, wherever authorized by the respective 
Legislatures of said States. Second, no portion of said fund nor 
the interest thereon shall be applied, directly or indirectly, under 
any pretense whatever, to the purchase, erection, preservation 
or repair of any building or buildings." 

The General Assembly of Iowa, September 11, 1862, accepted 
the grant upon the conditions and under the restrictions con- 
tained in the act of Congress, and by so doing entered into con- 
tract with the General Government to erect and keep in repair all 
buildings necessary for the use of the College. By this action of 
the General Assembly the College was changed from an agricul- 
tural institution into a College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 
with the broad and liberal course of study outlined in the follow- 
ing paragraph. 

In 1882 the General Assembly passed an act defining the 
course of study to be pursued as follows: Section 1. That Section 
1621 of the Code is herebj^ repealed and the following is enacted 
in- lieu thereof: "Section 1621. There shall be adopted and 
taught in the State Agricultural College, a broad, liberal and 
practical course of study, in which the leading branches of learn- 
ing shall relate to agriculture and the mechanic arts, and which 
shall also embrace such other branches of learning as will most 
practically and liberally educate the agricultural and industrial 
classes in the several pursuits and professions of life, including 
military tactics. Section 2. That all acts, and parts of acts in- 
consistent with this act are hereby repealed." 

August 30th the following act was approved by President 
Harrison: "Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represen- 



22 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tatives of the United States in Congress assembled, that there 
shall be and hereby is, annually appropriated, out of any moneys 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, arising from the sales 
of public lands, to be paid as hereinafter provided, to each State 
and Territory for the more complete endowment and mante- 
nance of colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts now established, or which may hereafter be established, in 
accordance with an act of Congress approved July second, eigh- 
teen hundred and sixty-two, the sum of fifteen thousand dollars 
for the year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and ninety, 
and an annual increase of the amount of such appropriation 
thereafter for ten years by an additional sum of one thousand 
dollars over the preceding year, and the annual amount to be 
paid thereafter to each State and Territory shall be twenty-five 
thousand dollars, to be applied only to instruction in agriculture, 
the mechanic arts, the English language and the various branches 
of mathematical, physical, natural and economic science, with 
special reference to their application in the industries of life, and 
to facilities for such instruction." 

The income of the College from National grants is therefore 
expended in instruction, experimentation and illustration in agri- 
culture and in the mechanic arts, and in underlying and related 
science and literature. 

All buildings are erected and all repairs thereon are made 
by the State of Iowa, the cost down to date being about $750,000. 

The College was formally opened on the 17th of March, 1869. 



AMES AND THE COLLEGE 2$ 



AMES AND THE COLLEGE 



The College occupies a delightful and healthful location upon 
high rolling land, just west of Ames, Story County. The railroad 
facilities for reaching Ames from every part of the State are 
excellent. It is at the junction of the Des Moines and the north- 
western branches and the main line of the Chicago & Northwest- 
ern Railroad. The main line of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 
Paul intersects the Northwestern at Slater, eleven miles south, 
and the through line of the same system at Algona on the north. 
The main line of the Illinois Central intersects the Chicago & 
Northwestern at Webster City, just north, and the main line of 
the Iowa Central makes good connections at Marshalltown on the 
east. All the railway connections of Des Moines have thirty- 
seven miles to Ames. The Chicago & Northwestern Railway has 
frequent trains, Des Moines to Ames and return. A steam motor 
railway connects Ames and the College with efficient service. 
Ames is a most desirable town for wholesome college influences. 
Its people are enterprising, thrifty and cordial. The town has an 
excellent system of public schools, numerous churches, water 
works, electric lights, and a good city government. It affords 
wholesome surroundings for the students. It is an inviting com- 
munity for families who wish to educate their children, enjoy 
the better elements of society and an environment of reasonable 
expenses. The town and College are on very cordial terms, 
and its citizens take marked pains in the efforts of the students 
and the highest interests of the College. It is a model location 
for factories and business enterprises. 



24 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 



BUILDINGS. 



Twenty-two commodious buildings have been erected by the 
State, for the exclusive use of the various departments of the 
College, besides the dwelling houses and buildings for farm stock, 
machinery and work. 

All these buildings are heated by steam and lighted by elec- 
tricity. Pure water is supplied to all of the buildings. 

There are two rooming cottages, brick buildings, affording 
rooms for ninety-four students. 

The other buildings are as follows, used for recitation and 
lecture rooms and laboratories: 

Chemical Hall: Brick, Three stories throughout; steam 
heat; water and gas. Laboratory outfit complete for 100 students 
in Chemistry. 

Veterinary Hospital: Brick, three stories, containing offices, 
dissecting rooms, and all modern appliances for the treatment 
of diseased animals. 

Sanitary Hall: Frame, two stories; lower floor, office, kitch- 
en and dining room for the hospital patients and rooms for con- 
valescents; upper floor, seven rooms for care of sick among the 
students. 

Engineering Laboratory: Brick, four stories, including base- 
ment, and large "L," containing machine shops, and the engi- 
neering laboratory, for the departments of Mechanical and Civil 
Engineering. 

The Wood Shop: Brick, containing carpenter and pattern 
shops, with power and hand tools complete for wood-work, and 
outfit of tools for individual work. 

Forge Shop and Foundry: Brick, containing complete equip- 
ment for forging and moulding. 

Engineering Hall: The Engineering Departments occupy 
the new Engineering Hall. This is a fire-proof building in which 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 25 

all the engineering departments have offices, recitation and 
lecture' rooms, laboratories and engineering museum. This build- 
ing is of Bedford stone, has plate glass windows, and modern 
conveniences and furnishings throughout. It is the best engi- 
neering building at present west of the Mississippi river. 

Power House: Brick, one story, contains engine and boiler, 
furnishing power for the shops, and accommodates experimental 
work of the course in Mechanical Engineering. The dynamos 
and motor power for electric engineering are how in this build- 
ing, also the deep well pump. 

Locomotive Laboratory: This building contains an eight- 
wheel locomotive and tender presented by the Chicago & North- 
western Railway Company. 

Music Hall: Brick, two stories, fitted up with apparatus and 
instruments for practice and instruction. 

The Administrative Building: Brick, for the use of trustees 
and faculty, and for offices of the president, secretary and treas- 
urer. 

Dwelling Houses: Eighteen comfortable dwelling houses on 
the grounds are occupied by professors' families, and several 
others by foremen and employes. 

MornlJ Hall is named in honor of Hon. Justin S. Morrill, the 
originator of 1L~ ''Land Grant" for Colleges of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts. The building cost about $35,000, including water 
supply, steam heat and electric light. It is of deep red brick, 
with stone foundation, and stone, brick and terra cotta trimmings 
interblended. 

It stands on the high ground of the beautiful campus, north 
of and near the main building. It is for Chapel, capacity, 650; 
Library, containing 18,000 volumes; the Museum, Lecture Rooms 
and Laboratories of the Department of Zoology. 

Agricultural Hall is a four-story building. The lower stories 
are composed of stone from the State quarries at Anamosa, and 
the upper stories are brick. It contains rooms for Horticulture, 
Agriculture, Agricultural Chemistry, Experiment Station work 
and Veterinary Medicine. It is finely lighted and heated and 
contains modern improvements. 

Greenhouses: The present plant, including recent additions, 
contains 10,000 square feet under glass. The houses are of 
cypress construction throughout with an interior supporting 



26 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

structure of steel. They are heated by steam, operated on the 
Paul system, with varying temperatures for the propagating 
house, growing houses, and seed testing rooms. Adjoining the 
greenhouses are four commodious work rooms, with benches for 
potting, transplanting, and general greenhouse handicraft opera- 
tions. 

The Horticultural Laboratory is a building 35x50 feet, two 
stories with basement. It is connected with the greenhouse. 
The main room contains desk room and lockers for 25 students. 
Adjoining is a pomology room with bench room for 25 students 
to work in the study of fruits. The building is provided with two 
refrigerators, one for experimental work in cold storage and the 
other for storing fruits for class purposes. The second floor is 
provided with horticultural museum and facilities for photo- 
graphy. 

Horse Barns and Stock Pavilion: The barn, composed of 
brick with slate roof, is for horses, the storage of grain and gen- 
eral farm purposes. One of the best stock pavilions in the coun- 
try, accommodating several hundred students at a time, is located 
near this barn and gives first class advantages for stock judg- 
ing and animal husbandry. It is circular in form, well heated 
and lighted. 

Station Barn: The Experiment Station barn is one of the 
best and most modern buildings of its kind to be found anywhere 
in the world. It is 50 feet wide, 100 feet long and has a round 
silo, 18 feet in diameter, on the northwest corner. It is veneered 
with buff pressed brick, has a slate roof and built in every way 
to provide for protection against fire. 

The lower story is devoted to live stock and is conveniently 
arranged for the housing of beef cattle, dairy cattle and horses. 
The floors are paved brick. The second story is used for the 
storage of vehicles, machinery, storage and grinding room for 
feed, and a complete set of seed rooms used by the Agronomy 
Section for the drying of corn and the storage of the different 
kinds of grain and feed stuffs used in experimental work. The 
third story is used as a storage room for hay and other coarse 
feed stuffs. The building has an electric motor, a complete water 
system and is lighted by electricity. 

Judging Pavilion: In connection with the Experiment Sta- 
tion barn is a two-story octagonal judging pavilion. It is 65 feet 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 27 

in diameter, built of buff pressed brick with a slate roof. The 
lower story is used for stock judging and has every available con- 
venience which would add to the comfort of the students and the 
effectiveness of the work — such as good light, comfortable seats, 
good ventilation and ample means of supplying warmth. 

The second story is used for the study of grain judging. It 
also is well equipped in every way. This building is conceded 
to be the most complete structure of its kind to be found any- 
where on the continent. 

The Farm Mechanics Building: This building has been 
erected for the newly created department of Farm Mechanics. 
The building is 60 x 100 feet, four stories high, having two main 
floors and two balconies. Being built out of steel and pressed 
brick, it is entirely fire-proof. The cost of the building with 
equipment is about $70,000.00 and it is no doubt the best building 
ever constructed for the teaching of farm mechanics. 

On the lower floor are private workshops for the construc- 
tion and repair of implements on the college farm, also tool 
rooms in which all the tools and instruments of the department 
are kept. The blacksmith shop and a room for the study and 
care of traction engines and other farm motors are also located 
on the lower floor. On the balcony above is located the car- 
penter shop. 

On the second floor are the offices and class rooms of the 
professor in charge of the department. Also a drafting room and 
a students' reading room. A large machine operating room on 
this floor is devoted to the erection, care, and testing of the 
various kinds of farm implements such as binders, mowers, 
rakes, corn-huskers and shredders, plows, harrows, etc. 

The second balcony is devoted to experiments with corn 
planters and for exhibitions of various kinds of small farm tools. 
On this floor are also located bulletin rooms, a photographic de- 
partment and offices for the assistants in the department as well 
as office room for the Iowa Agriculturist. 

The Dairy Building is a three-story structure with a base- 
ment and an attic. Its dimensions are 110x60 feet. It is built 
of buff pressed brick, trimmed with Bedford stone. On the 
ground or first floor are located the factory, butter and cheese 
rooms, bottling room, testing room, refrigerators, lunch room, 
toilet and bath rooms. On the second floor are the offices, re- 



28 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

search laboratory, farm dairy room, students' testing laboratory, 
and a lecture room. Most of the rooms on the third floor are 
devoted to dairy bacteriology. The dairy library and read- 
ing room are also on this floor. The building will be heated, 
ventilated, and the cold storage rooms refrigerated according to 
the most modern methods. 

The Horticulture Barn, which was completed the past sum- 
mer, is a substantial three-story frame building covered with 
brick veneer and slate roof. 

On the basement floor, stalls are provided for the teams 
belonging to the department, also for the public grounds work. 
The second story is devoted to the storage of spray implements 
and other farm machinery. 

Adjoining the Horticulture barn, is a machine shed 25 x 35 
which is devoted to the storage of road machinery and other im- 
plements used on the public grounds and campus. 

Other buildings. Stables, barns, sheep and swine houses, 
seed houses, etc., sufficient for the requirements of the farm, are 
conveniently grouped near the College campus. 

MARGARET HALL. 

A comodious and inviting building has been opened for the 
young women in the College. It is well designed for its purpose, 
built of brick, roofed with slate and is architecturally pleasing. 
It occupies one of the most sightly locations on the campus, giv- 
ing the most pleasing outlook to its occupants. It is provided 
with steam heat, electric lights, ample parlors, bath rooms and 
the most improved modern conveniences. It is neatly and taste- 
fully furnished throughout. The Department of Domestic Econ- 
omy is also located in the building and open to all young women 
of the College. Rooms will be assigned to new students in the 
order of their application. The young women are under the 
direction of an efficient dean of women. 

THE COLLEGE GROUNDS. 

The College domain includes over 1,000 acres. Of this about 
125 acres are set apart for College grounds. These occupy the 
high land of the southwest part of the farm, and include the 
campus, shrubbery, plantations, young forestry plantations, the 
flower borders and gardens, with the beginnings of a botanical 



BUILDINGS, GROUNDS AND EQUIPMENTS 29 

garden, and the surroundings of the professors' dwellings. Gravel 
drives, cement and gravel walks, lead to all parts of the grounds 
and to the various buildings, and the true principles of landscape 
gardening have been so faithfully observed in the gardening and 
in the location of buildings and drives as to make of the entire 
campus a large and beautiful park. The view of the surrounding 
country from the upper stories oi the large buildings is one of 
wide extent and beauty. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

CASSIFICATION AND GRADING 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND DEGREES 

POST-GRADUATE COURSES OF STUDY AND ADVANCED 
DEGREES 



32 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 



METHODS OF ADMISSION. 

Students are admitted to the freshman year by meeting the 
conditions set forth in any one of the following plans: 

(1) By graduation from a high school belonging to the list 
of accredited schools prepared by the committee on college 
entrance requirements appointed by the State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. Graduates of such schools who present the uniform 
blank certificate of preparatory grades properly filled out and 
certified are admitted without examination. (See page 44 for 
list of schools together with accepted credits). 

(2) Upon the completion of the studies of the academic 
year of the college, and the studies necessary for entrance to 
the same, students are admitted to freshmen standing without 
examination. (For work covered in the academic year and en- 
trance requirements thereto, see page 33). 

(3) Experience has proven that a large number of students 
have secured admission to the College by examinations taken 
either at their homes or at the College. The heads of the various 
departments cheerfully unite with county superintendents and 
principals of schools in arranging for such examinations at home 
as will admit students to our classes. By special arrangements 
questions for examination will be sent to county or city superin- 
tendents who are willing to conduct the examination. In all 
cases the manuscripts are returned to the College for marking 
and due notice sent the applicant of the record received. The 
attention of applicants for admission is particularly called to this 
arrangement by which all their entrance examinations can be 
taken at convenient places near home. 

Students preferring to do so may take their examinations 
at the College; such examinations are held the first and second 
days of each semester. It is of the very greatest importance that 
all examinations necessary and classification be completed not 
later than the close of the third day of each semester. 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 33 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Graduate and undergraduate students of other colleges are 
admitted and granted such credits as their work will justify. 
Work of recognized merit that has been taken at colleges or 
universities of good rank and standing will be credited for an 
equivalent amount of work so far as it applies in any of the 
courses offered at this College. Students taking up work in this 
way will consult the president and heads of departments and 
ascertain the credits to be allowed; these credits may at the 
option of the head of the department be conditioned on satis- 
factory work during the student's first term in College. 

ADMISSION TO ACADEMIC CLASSES. 

The one academic year, introductory to the various courses, 
covers in thorough review the more important branches of pre- 
paratory studies such as are given in the advanced years of the 
high school, and makes it possible to require, and possible to 
insure, adequate preparation of all students before entering 
them to the freshman year. Students failing to present the 
proofs of work done as above suggested, will be expected to write 
the examinations. Examinations for admission will be held 
on the first three days of the school year, or may be conducted 
prior to the opening of the college year at the home of the candi- 
date under the supervision of the city or county superintendent. 
In so far as teachers' certificates or standings from high schools 
cover the entrance requirement subjects, they will be accepted 
in lieu of the examinations. In order to ascertain the capabil- 
ities of students, members of the new academic classes are often 
given a brief review in essential subjects. By this method stu- 
dents are easily and quickly assigned to just such work as they 
possess ability to do with greatest profit to themselves. 

The subjects taught are arranged with reference to their 
importance in preparing students for the regular college courses 
and in order to concentrate the work of the students upon a 
limited field and produce results most beneficial, are few in 
number. 

Graduates of accredited high schools with less than twenty- 
eight semester credits, and graduates of small high schools who 
have had two or three years of high school work will be ad- 



34 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

mitted to review or regular work in the first or second term 
academic classes. The brief review given in the more impor- 
tant studies is most highly beneficial to students; the College 
authorities learn their ability and can the more easily render 
them assistance in their work. 

In all cases students are promoted as rapidly as they demon- 
strate their ability to do work in advanced classes. 

Since the student's success or failure in a technical insti- 
tution depends to a very great extent upon an adequate prepara- 
tion in mathematics, great importance is attached to the sub- 
ject and the most careful training and drill are afforded in both 
algebra and geometry. 

The work in English is designed to give the student facility 
in the use of the language and the ability to express his thoughts 
clearly and forcibly as well as a critical knowledge of the Eng- 
lish classics. 

Emphasis is placed on the value of the study of history, both 
from the standpoint of culture and that of usefulness. The aim 
of the year's work is to give students the broadest outlook and 
a sympathetic appreciation of what the world has already 
achieved. 

The instruction in each branch is under the direct super- 
vision of the head of the department of the College and is in 
every way as carefully conducted as that in the regular college 
classes. In all cases students are under the immediate charge 
and oversight of the College faculty and receive counsel, direc- 
tion and assistance as needed from its individual members. The 
experience of years shows that students who have taken the 
academic work are often better fitted for the subsequent courses 
of study than some of those who have secured their training 
elsewhere. 

When an examination in grammar is required of first term 
academic students it will cover the following subjects: The 
eight parts of speech, the classification of nouns, pronouns, adjec- 
tives and adverbs, the declension of nouns and pronouns, the 
comparison of adjectives and adverbs, and the rules of spelling 
that apply in grammatical inflection. 

Students seeking admission to the second term of the aca- 
demic year will need to meet the requirements for admission to 
the first term and in addition thereto, pass a satisfactory ex- 



ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE 35 

amination in the studies of that term. In lieu of examinations in 
drawing standings of approved high schools will be accepted. 
No student assigned to the algebra of the first term will be 
allowed to take plane geometry. 

The examination in algebra will include addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, division, factoring, highest common factor, lowest 
common multiple, fractions, simple equations containing one 
or more unknown quantities, problems involving equations of 
the first degree, and the discussion of such equations. 

The examinations in English will cover the entire field of 
grammar, except prosody. In this examination much will depend 
upon the candidate's ability to analyze a passage of good modern 
prose, and to punctuate his paper correctly. In analyzing he 
should be prepared to treat phrases and clauses as units, and 
to state the exact function of conjunctive words. He should 
show a ready and accurate knowledge of the structure of the 
prose sentence and the relation of its various parts to one 
another. 

The examination in history will cover general history. The 
student is expected to be familiar with the leading facts of the 
history of the Eastern nations, of Greece and Rome, and 
mediaeval and modern Europe. 

HOW TO ENTER THE COLLEGE. 

Persons who desire to enter the College as new students 
should comply with the following directions; 

1. Study carefully "Methods of Admission." Then write 
the president, giving age, preparation for college work, and the 
course you desire to take. If a graduate of any high school in 
the list of "Accredited High Schools" in this state, or of similarly 
accredited high schools in any other state, no preliminary exam- 
inations will be required for entrance to the freshman year in 
any course, provided, proper certificate showing twenty-eight 
or thirty acceptable semester credits is presented. See para- 
graphs (a) and (b) under "Accredited High Schools" below. 
If not a graduate of an accredited high school the conditions of 
entrance given on page 33 should be carefully followed. 

2. When you arrive, at the opening of the term, go to the 
president's office for a card of directions. 

3. Students who do not bring certificates of proficiency in 



63 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the studies required such as meet the approval of the examining 
committee will be examined here. When all the examinations 
are completed and your standings therein are marked on your 
examination card take it to the classification committee in the 
office of Dean Stanton. If you have passed the studies required 
you will then secure a card of classification, which certifies your 
admission to the College and assignment to class work. Your 
name will be entered at once upon the official class lists and will 
be included in the roll call of the following day. You will be 
expected to attend thereafter ever recitation of the term. 

4. Information concerninig board and rooms may be secured 
by writing Mr. Benjamin Edwards, the "College Custodian," 
Ames, Iowa. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 37 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 



The requirements for admission are stated in terms of semes- 
ters, The term semester as herein used means the equivalent 
of eighteen weeks, five days a week, on the basis of four studies 
a day. Thirty semesters are required for unconditioned admis- 
sion to freshman year. The following are the minimum en- 
trance requirements as adopted by the college section of the Iowa 
State Teachers' Association in December, 1904: 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

Mathematics 5 semesters 

English 6 semesters 

Science 2 semesters 

History 2 semesters 

Foreign language 4 semesters 

Total required units 19 

Elective units 11 

Total 30 

CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Mathematics (Alg. 3 and Geom. 2) 5 semesters 

English 6 semesters 

Science 2 semesters 

History 2 semesters 

Latin or Greek 8 semesters 

Total required units 23 

Electives 7 

Total 30 

Electives to make up the required number of units as above 

indicated may be selected from the following list of subjects: 
In addition to semester credits required as set forth above 

elective credits may be made up in science, history, foreign 



38 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

language, Greek, physiography, civil government, political econ- 
omy, physiology, commercial geography, drawing and manual 
training. 

While the State College does not offer classical courses nor 
give the classical degrees, Greek and Latin taken in high schools 
are given full value and recognition towards meeting entrance 
requirements for any of the College courses counting as elective 
or foreign language credit. 

Students from high schools presenting credits in excess of 
the number required for admission may receive credit for the 
same only upon passing a satisfactory examination under the 
direction of the department concerned, the amount of credit 
granted to be determined by the head of the department inter- 
ested. 

As previously stated the requirements for all courses include 
graduation from a high school belonging to the list of accredited 
schools prepared by the committee on college entrance require- 
ments appointed by the State Teachers' Association, approved 
standings in the studies of the academic year and the studies 
necessary for entrance to that year, or the passing of a satis- 
factory examination. 

For all the engineering courses students will be required to 
present one year's work in either French or German.* 

Mathematics, English and history are among the studies 
most strongly emphasized in preparation for the work of the 
freshman year, and students from schools with less than twenty- 
eight semester credits will be expected to pass an examination 
in them. Credits granted in lieu of these examinations must be 
upon work approved by the heads of departments. 

Students may enter the beginning work of the Freshman 
year, Second Semester as well as the first, except in German. 

The students admitted to freshman standing will take re- 
view work in English, history and algebra during the first few 
days of the term. 

In English this work will be a series of written exercises 
designed to test the student's general preparation in English, 
including spelling, grammar, punctuation and elementary rhet- 
oric. This test is intended as a practical one, not as a review 



*Two years' work will be required beginning with September, 1906. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 39 

in mere theory; memorized rules and principles will count for 
little; readiness in applying them is the real test. A student 
whose sentences are notably incorrect needs further drill in 
grammar; one whose paragraphing shows no definite plan needs 
additional practice in elementary composition. 

In algebra all subjects up to and including quadratics will 
be treated, and the ability of the student to demonstrate prin- 
ciples and solve examples and problems will be tested. 

Students may enter the beginning work of the freshman year 
the second semester as well as the first. 

For information concerning admission to the veterinary 
course the student will consult the references cited in the general 
index. 

SUGGESTIVE LIST OF EXAMINATION QUESTIONS. 

ALGEBRA. 

1. From5xy — (m — n) (k+1) — (a+b>(d+c) substract (d+c) 
( a — b ) + 5 ( k+ 1 ) — acy — mny . 

2. Remove the parentheses and simplify 
fa+b 1 f2(y+4) 



7x 2 — <> y— 4— (n- 



>■ 



[c— d J [ 3 

a+b ) 

— 7x 2 — — m-8+nf+8 

c— d ) 

State the rule by which parentheses preceded by the plus or 
minus sign are removed. 

3. Divide — 45a- 2x b- 3 c x (m-fn) 5 +ab x c 1 +x(mH2mn+n 3 ) 3 
by 3a 7 b 2 c*(m-f n) 3 . 

4. Write the product of (3x— 2) (3x+5), of 

and also of (3y+l) (3y — 1) and give the special rules of multi- 
plication used. 

5. Resolve a 12 — a 8 b 4 — a 4 b 8 +b 12 into its prime factors. 

6. Find the lowest common multiple of 

2x 4 +3x 8 +3x— 2 and 3x 4 +5x 3 +x 2 -f5x— 2. 

7. Simplify 

a 2 — b b 2 +a 1+ab 

+ + 



(a— b) (a— 1) (b+1) (b— a) (1— a) (1+b) 



40 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

What is the effect on a fraction of changing: 

(a) Any two of the three following signs: sign of nu- 
merator, sign of denominator, or apparent sign of 
the fraction. 

(b) The signs of an odd number of factors in the nu- 

erator. 

(c) The signs of an even number of factors in the 
numerator. 

8. Solve the following equation, 

3 (x— 5) 2(x+16) 
x 8x 



:— 3 17 

=x+l 



8 4 6 

9. A man rowing at a certain rate makes the round trip 
from A up stream to B, 24 miles distant, and return, in 5 hours. 
Having six hours at his disposal, he starts to make the trip, but 
when 16 miles from A, the boat springs a leak which causes 
him to land. In so doing he loses 40 minutes, but by walking at 
three-fourths the speed the boat would have carried him, he is 
able to spend an hour in B, and reach home in the required time 
by a train moving at twice the speed which the boat would have 
moved down stream. What is the rate in miles per hour of the 
man rowing in still water and what is the rate of the current? 

10. Find the values of a and b in the following: 

3 4b 

=21 

2a b— 2a-f3 

1 1 

- + =~l 

a b— 2a+3 

11. Find the value of (— 5a — y b c ) freeing the result 
of negative exponents. 

12. Find the cube root of: 

8a|— 12a^+42a- 1 /*— 37a-l+63a-|— 27a-|+27a~l 

13. Find the sum of: 

f / 54xa-3y6, /16xa+6y3 an d ^/2x*a+9 
2n n 3n 

14. Multiply /x 3 by -/x by /x 8 

3 |3 

15. Find the cube root of -/ — 

5 5 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 41 



16. Multiply V 2 — 3 V —5 by V 5+ V —3 

17. Find the square root of the binominal surd 67+7 V 72 



18. Solve Vx 2 — 6x— 5Vx 2 — 6x+6=r0 

19. Solve 9x 2 — 5xy=21 and xy — y 2 — — 4, solving for x and y. 

20. Two trains starting at the same time and going in oppo- 
site directions between M and N, upon meeting, have differed in 
the distance covered by 20 miles. It is found that the train 
from M will reach N in one and one-half hours from the time of 
meeting and the train from N will reach M in 40 minutes. How 
far apart are M and N, and what is the rate of each train? 

FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

Students who take Freshman German of the second year 
in the Engineering course will be required to have a thorough 
knowledge of the principles of German grammar, such as are 
given in Vos's Essentials of German, and to have read one simple 
book like Storm's "Immensee." They must be prepared to read 
a book as difficult as Hilern's "Hoher Als Die Kirche." 

Students taking Freshman French, or the second year in 
the engineering courses, will be required to have a thorough 
knowledge of the principles of French grammar as given in 
the first part of Fraser and Squair's French Grammar. They 
must have read at least one simple book like Bruno's "Le Tour 
de la France." 

ENGLISH. 

The examinations in English will include questions in gram- 
mar and elementary rhetoric and also one or more essays, to test 
the student's readiness and accuracy of expression. The fol- 
lowing list of questions indicates the general nature of the ex- 
amination: 

I. In the following sentence, (a) state the exact gram- 
matical relationship of each phrase and clause; (b) parse the 
words in black; (c) account for punctuation: "What if their 
palaces were grand, and their villas beautiful, and their dresses 
magnificent, and their furniture costly, if their lives were spent 
in ignoble and enervating pleasures, as is generally admitted?" 

II. In the following sentences name the part of speech and 
state the office of the words in black: 



42 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

(a) I believe him to be unprejudiced. 

(b) Alice, did you go boating yesterday? 

(c) It cost me a struggle to give up the trip. 

(d) They let him stay. 

(e) "Ask yourself seriously whether you are fit to read 
such revelations as are to follow." 

III. Discuss fully and carefully four of the following topics: 

(a) The topic sentence and its development. 

(b) The respective advantages of the long sentence, the 
periodic sentence, the balanced sentence. 

(c) Unity in the paragraph. 

(d) Coherence in the composition. 

(e) Emphasis in the sentence. 

IV. Write an essay of from 250 to 350 words on one of the 
following topics: 

(a) A Reminiscence of My Childhood. 

(b) Why I like — a book, an eminent man, a place. 

(c) Describe a view from . 

(d) All Students Should be Required to Take Athletics. 
NOTE. — These essays are considered an important part of 

the examination. They will be graded mainly on diction, sen- 
tence structure and connection, and paragraphing. Good pen- 
manship, neatness of manuscript, and correct spelling and punct- 
uation are also important. 

HISTORY. 

In addition to American history the requirements cover the 
entire European field, including the three grand divisions — an- 
cient, mediaeval, and modern. The questions below indicate the 
general character of the examination in European history: 

1. Discuss (a) the significance of the Nile in the history 
of Egypt, and (b) the arts and industries of ancient Egypt, (c) 
Outline the work of a famous iJgyptian king. 

2. Give the date, important facts, and results of the Persian 
invasion of Greece in the reign of Darius. 

3. The Athenian Empire: (a) trace its origin; (b) when 
was it at its height? (c) State the effect of the Peloponnesian 
war upon it. 

4. Discuss the influence of the geographical features of 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDEDTS 43 

Italy upon Roman history. Name the races of people in Italy 
at the dawn of the Italian history. 

5. Outline the chief features of the Roman constitution to 
the reign of Augustus. 

6. Feudalism: (a) its origin; (b) classes in feudal society; 
(c) feudal rights and obligations; (d) value of feudalism. 

7. Give date, causes, and results of the Crusades. 

8. Discuss the rise and growth of the Italian city republics. 

9. Magna Charta: (a) circumstances under which it was 
secured; (b) chief provisions. 

10. Reformation in Germany: (a) leading men; (b) prin- 
cipal steps in the movement. 

11. Discuss fully the causes of the French revolution. 

12. Something of importance concerning each of the follow- 
ing: Cardinal Wolsey, William the Silent, Cardinal Richelieu, 
Gustavus Adolphus, Charles Martel, Peter the Great, Oliver 
Cromwell, Lord Nelson, Bismarck. 

ADVANTAGES OF ENTERING IN JANUARY. 

Students may enter College at the opening of the second 
semester in January as advantageously as in the fall. For many 
who need to review the work of the academic year before enter- 
ing the freshman year this affords an excellent opportunity. 

Many students will find it desirable to begin their work 
in college in this term. Those who have had considerable Alge- 
bra in the preparatory school should review its fundamental 
principles and become acquainted with their application in the 
wider and more difficult field of college work, and those who have 
had experience in plane geometry can to advantage supplement 
such study by a review of some standard text and a thorough 
drill on the original geometric propositions. The classes in these 
studies established at the beginning of the spring term furnish 
an excellent opportunity for students to prepare themselves 
thoroughly for entering upon collegiate work at the opening of 
the next school year. 

In like manner, students who have completed grammar and 
have had a high school course in rhetoric, have an opportunity 
in this term to review the principles of style and correct what- 
ever errors they still make in expressing their thoughts. With- 
out a thorough grounding in the principles of style and a con- 



44 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



siderable degree of accuracy in choosing words and constructing 
sentences, also in planning and developing paragraphs, it is 
practically impossible for a student to do creditable work in 
Freshman English. To begin work in this term would prepare 
many for a better standing throughout their course than would 
otherwise be possible. 

ACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOLS. 

(a) Below is printed the list of high schools whose work is 
accredited by the committee on secondary school relations, to- 
gether with the maximum number of semesters credits allowed 
each on the last analysis of their course of study. Graduates 
of these high schools may be classed as unconditioned freshmen 
upon the presentation of the proper certificates showing com- 
pletion of not less than thirty semesters credits in studies ac- 
ceptable to the College, and enter into one or more of its courses. 

(b) Graduates who present twenty-eight acceptable semes- 
ter credits may classify as conditioned freshmen at the opening 
of the college year, the conditions to be made up as soon as 
possible after entrance. No one can be admitted to the freshman 
class in any course with less than twenty-eight semester credits. 



Ackley 32 

Adair 30 

Adel— Lat 31 

Phil 30 

Albia— Lat 31 

Engl 29 

Algona 

Allerton ...18 

Alton— Lat 27 

Gen 24 

Ames — Lat 32 

Engl 29 

Anamosa — Lat 32 

Engl 30 

Anita 26 

Atlantic — Lat 32 

German 32 

Audubon — Elect 37 

Avoca — Lat 31 

Ger 31 

Engl 31 

Bedford— Lat 31 

Engl 28 



Belmond — Lat. 

Engl. . . 
Boone — Lat. . . 

Sc 

Engl. . . 



32 

28 

32 

33 

25 

Brighton 31 

Brooklyn— Lat 30 

Engl 23 

Burlington — Elec 42 

Capital Park — Lat 31 

Sc 30 

Engl 28 

Carroll — Lat 31 

Gen 31 

Cedar Palls— Lat 34 

Engl 33 

Cedar Rapids — CI 35 

Lat.-Sc 34 

Centerville— CI 31 

Sc 33 

Chariton — Lat 34 

Engl 31 

Charter Oak 26 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 



45 



Charles City— CI 30 

Sc 30 

Engl 29 

Cherokee — Lat 33 

German 30 

Sc 28 

Clarinda — Elec 40 

Clarion — Lat 29 

Sc 29 

Clear Field 30 

Clear Lake — Lat 18 

Engl 16 

Clinton— Elec 48 

Colfax — Lat 28 

Engl 27 

Columbus Junction — Lat ... 31 

Engl. 27 

Coon Rapids 30 

Corning — Lat 33 

Sc 31 

Correctionville 27 

Corydon — Lat 34 

Engl 25 

Council Bluffs— CI 36 

Lat.-Sc 33 

German 33 

Cresco 29 

Creston — Elec 45 

Davenport — CI 50 

Sc 46 

Decorah — Lat 38 

Gen 32 

Engl 30 

Denison — Lat 33 

Sc 36 

Des Moines, E. — Elec 40 

Des Moines, N 50 

Des Moines, W — Elec 52 

De Witt 27 

Dexter 32 

Dubuque — CI 32 

Lat.-Sc 32 

Sc 32 

Dysart 19 

Eagle Grove — CI 30 

Lat.-Sc 29 

Eldon — Lat 32 

Engl 30 



Eldora — Lat 29 

Engl 25 

Elkader — Lat 30 

German 30 

Engl. 27 

Emmetsburg — Lat 31 

Sc 25 

Estherville — Lat 34 

Lat.-Sc 28 

Fairfield 38 

Farmington 

Fayette 24 

Fonda 28 

Fontanelle — Lat 29 

Engl 26 

Forest City 28 

Fort Dodge — Lat.-Sc 34 

Modern Lan 34 

Engl 29 

Fort Madison — Lat.-Engl. . . 29 

Ger.-Engl 29 

Sc.-Engl 26 

Garner — Lat 30 

Engl 26 

Geneseo, 111. — Prep.-Elec. . . 37 

Engl.-Elec 35 

Glenwood — Lat 33 

Engl 29 

Glidden — Lat 33 

Grand Junction — Sc 23 

Greene — Engl 24 

Lat 28 

Greenfield — Lat 27 

Engl 22 

Grinnell — Lat 34 

Engl 29 

Grundy Center 35 

Guthrie Center — Lat 32 

Engl 25 

Guthrie Co. (High School) — 

Lat 25 

Sc 20 

Hamburg — CI 29 

Engl 29 

Hampton — Lat 32 

Engl 27 

Harlan — Elec 32 



46 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Hartley — Lat 27 

Engl 23 

Ha war den — Acad 26 

Normal 32 

Commer 32 

Holstein 29 

Hubbard 30 

Humboldt — Lat 25 

Engl 25 

Ida Grove — Lat 30 

German .. 28 

Independence — Lat 30 

Engl. 25 

Indianola — Lat 32 

Sc 32 

Iowa City— Lat 33 

Engl 34 

Iowa Falls — Lat 32 

Engl 28 

Jefferson — Lat. 31 

Modern CI 32 

Modern Lan 31 

Keokuk— Elec 43 

Keosauqua — Lat 27 

Engl 22 

Kingsley 32 

Knoxville — Lat 34 

Engl 31 

Lake City— Col.-Prep 31 

Ger.-Sc 32 

Teachers 33 

Lake Mills — 

Lamoni — Lat 30 

Engl 29 

Le Mars — Elec 43 

Leon 

Lime Springs 21 

Lyons — Elec 44 

Manchester — Lat 32 

Engl 30 

Manning 32 

Mapleton — Elec 27 

Maquoketa — Elec 38 

Marengo — Lat 32 

Sc 32 

Marion — Elec 39 



Marshalltown — Elec 44 

Mason City — Regular 29 

Col.-Prep 28 

Engl 25 

McGregor — Lat.-Ger 31 

German 27 

Lat 27 

Engl 22 

Mechanicsville — Lat 23 

Engl 20 

Milton 21 

Missouri Valley — Elec 31 

Com'l 32 

Engl .35 

Sc 31 

Lang 40 

Moline, 111 — 

Montezuma 35 

Monticello — 

Morning Sun — Lat 31 

Sc 30 

Moulton — Lat 35 

Engl 32 

Mt. Ayr— Lat 31 

Engl 29 

Mt. Pleasant — Elec 36 

Muscatine — Lat-Engl 36 

Ger.-Engl 36 

Nashua — Elec 41 

Neola— Lat 30 

Ger 30 

Nevada 30 

New Hampton — Lat 36 

Engl 31 

New Sharon 28 

Newton 39 

North English 23 

Northwood— Lat 28 

Engl 24 

Oak Park, Des. M— Lat 33 

Engl 32 

Odebolt— Lat 29 

General 26 

Oelwein — Lat 31 

Engl 31 

Onawa — Elec 31 

Orange City — Lat 30 

Engl 27 

Osage — Lat 32 

Engl 27 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 



Osceola — Lat 32 

Engl ...27 

Oskaloosa — Lat 35 

Sc 29 

Ottumwa — Elec 42 

Parkersburg 31 

Pella— Lat 31 

Engl 23 

Perry — Lat 31 

Sc 26 

Postville— Lat 32 

German 30 

Elec 36 

Red Oak 40 

Reinbeck — Lat 30 

Engl 26 

Riceville 27 

Richland 19 

Rockford — Elec 39 

Rock Rapids — Elec 29 

Rockwell City 32 

Rolfe 32 

Sac City— Lat 30 

Sc 32 

Sanborn 31 

Shelby— Lat 27 

Ger 27 

Sheldon — Elec 45 

Shell Rock— Lat 28 

Engl 28 

Shenandoah — Elec 35 

Sibley— Lat 31 

Ger 29 

Sidney — Lat 32 

Ger.-Sc 31 

Sigourney — Lat 29 

Lat.-Eng 27 

Engl 26 

Sioux City— CI 32 

Lat.-Sc 31 

Lat.-Ger 32 

Engl.-Ger 29 

Sioux Falls, S. D.— CI 41 

Sc 37 

Civic 30 

Sioux Rapids — Lat 26 

Engl 24 

Sloan 31 

Spencer — Lat 39 

Sc 38 



Springdale — Lat 24 

Engl 22 

Springville 24 

State Center 21 

Storm Lake — Lat 33 

Engl 32 

Spirit Lake — Lat 31 

Engl 30 

Stuart 32 

Tabor — 

Tama City — Lat 29 

Engl 26 

Taylorville, 111. — Lat 34 

Engl 28 

Tipton— Lat 32 

General 32 

Toledo — 

Traer — Lat 29 

Engl 23 

Villisca— Elec 42 

Vinton— Lat 32 

Engl 31 

Wapello 36 

Washington — Lat 30 

Lit. & Business 24 

Waterloo, E. — Lat.-Elec ... 37 

Engl.-Elec 30 

Waterloo, W — Lat 32 

Engl 30 

Waukon — Lat 31 

Engl 29 

Waverly — Lat 32 

Sc 35 

Webster City— CI 34 

Lat.-Sc 35 

Engl 32 

W r est Liberty — Lat 31 

Sc 29 

West Union 35 

Williamsburg 30 

Wilton— Lat 27 

Lat.-Engl 24 

Winfield 27 

Winterset 31 

Cedar Valley Seminary, 
Osage— CI 33 

Sc 23 

Chas. City College — Elec. 37 

Decorah Institute — 

Denison Normal School — 



48 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Col. Prep 28 

Sc 26 

CI 28 

Dexter Normal College 32 

Epworth Seminary 87 

Howes Academy, Mt. P 34 

Iowa City Academy — Lat . . 32 

Sc 35 

Jewell Lutheran College, 

Jewell— CI 41 

Engl.-Sc 31 

Lincoln Academy, Lincoln, 

Neb.— CI. 34 

Phil 38 

Sc. 33 

Mich. Military Acad., Or- 
chard Lake, Mich. — Reg. 50 



Mt. St. Joseph Academy, 

Dubuque — 

Northwestern Classical Acad., 

Orange City 40 

Sac City Institute— CI 24 

Phil 26 

Sc 25 

St. Agatha's Sem., Iowa 

City, Academy 32 

St. Ansgar's Sem — 

St. Mary's 32 

St. Francis Acad., Council 

Bluffs — 

Washington Academy — 

Whittier College, Salem... 2 5 
Woodbine Normal School. 33 

Geo. H. Betts, Secretary. 



STUDENTS' EXPENSES AND EQUIPMENT. 



No charge is made for tuition to Iowa students. To those 

who come from outside the state $24.00 tuition per year is 

charged. 

Furnished rooms and board can be secured in clubs and 

private families adjacent to the College grounds at from $3.50 to 

$4.00 per week. 

Every student entering College shall, before being classified, 

pay a — 

** Janitor fee of $ 5 . 00 

The current expenses of students who occupy rooms in the 

College dormitories during the year are as follows: 
In Margaret Hall — 

Lighting, heating and incidentals, per week $ .55 

Room rent, per term 3 . 00 

*Hospital fee, per term 2 . 50 

In the Cottages — 

Fuel, lighting and incidentals, per week $ .40 

Room rent, per term 3 . 00 

♦Hospital fee, per term 2 . 50 

**Students who fail to register and classify during the classification period 
ending with the first Saturday of each semester, will be charged a Janitor and 
Incidental fee of $8.00 instead of $5.00. 

*See terms of Hospital Depaatment page 49. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 49 

As security for the payment of bills, students liv- 
ing in the College buildings are required to de- 
posit with the Treasurer $10.00 

This deposit will be returned on final settlement at the 
close of term. 

In the assignment of the rooms in the College dormitories, 
students who wish to take the regular four year courses will 
be given the preference. 

All bills for each month must, without fail, be settled at the 
Treasurer's office by the second Saturday of the month following. 

Students using laboratories in the various departments of 
the College are required to pay a laboratory fee at the beginning 
of each term to cover expenses of breakage, etc., thus incurred 
and the professors in charge require the Treasurer's receipt for 
such fee before admitting the students to laboratory practice. 

For amounts of such fees see department courses. 

Students purchasing military uniforms will deposit $5.00 
with the merchant tailor at the time measures are taken, paying 
the remainder on delivery. 

For heating, lighting, cleaning and care of the College 
buildings students pay less than the items actually cost the 
institution. Injury to College property, of whatever sort, is 
charged to the author, when known; otherwise to the section or 
to the entire body of students, as may seem just in the given case. 

Students who board in any of the College buildings furnish 
their own bedding, and all furniture for their rooms, excepting 
bedsteads, washstands, tables and wardrobes. 

Students are earnestly advised to make their rooms comfort- 
able and cheerful. Male students in the two lower classes, not 
physically disabled, are required by law to take the military 
drill and purchase uniforms therefor. "Physical disability" must 
be certified to by the College Physician, on examination. 

Text books and stationery may be purchased at the College 
Book Store, at about twenty-five per cent, below the average 
retail price. 

COLLEGE HOSPITAL. 

The actual sanitary condition of the College is excellent. 
The buildings are situated on high ground with good natural 
drainage. The water supply is exceptionally pure and abundant. 
The sewer system and sewage disposal plant are the best that 

4 



50 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

modern sanitary engineering can devise. Nevertheless in this, 
as in other like institutions, whose students are drawn from a 
wide territory, various diseases are brought here by the students 
themselves. In order to control epidemics and properly care for 
other cases of illness or injury a hospital is provided. This 
hospital is under the charge of the College physician, assisted by 
a professional nurse, a competent housekeeper, and a student 
hospital steward. 

The expenses of the hospital are defrayed from a fund 
accruing from hospital fees paid by students. 

The hospital fee for the term is fixed at $2.50, and is required 
of all students living in College buildings. 

The privileges of the hospital are also extended to students 
not rooming in the College buildings, provided, 1st, that the 
physician shall be paid for calls at their residences, and 2nd, 
that the usual hospital fee shall be paid within the first ten 
days of the student's arrival. 

Students not making the hospital deposit will be admitted 
to the hospital upon the basis of $10.00 per week, within the 
discretion of the college physician. 

The hospital fee insures to the payer thereof, medical attend- 
ance, nursing and medicine in illness or accident, and consulta- 
tion and medicine for minor ailments, in accordance with the 
regulations herein published. 

The charges named are based upon the probable actual cost 
of medical attendance and hospital service, and the fund created 
is carefully devoted to these purposes. The College can not 
assume any liability beyond the extent of the fund so created. 
The hospital has proved to be a great blessing to the students. 

The following regulations apply to the privileges of the 
hospital : 

1st. Students entering the hospital shall be charged $3.00 
per week for board, room, light and heat. But for any time in 
excess of three consecutive weeks per term spent in the hospital 
an additional charge above that mentioned shall be made of $4.00 
per week. 

2nd. In case a special nurse or physician is employed the 
expense shall be borne by the particular patient, the selection of 
such nurse or physician to be approved by the College physician. 

3rd. The College assumes no responsibility whatever nor 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 51 

shall the privileges of the hospital be extended to cases of small- 
pox. 

4th. The President and College Physician shall require of 
students entering the college a certificate of a reputable physician 
showing successful vaccination. 

5th. The College physician is authorized to exclude from 
the College dormitories and recitation rooms any person afflicted 
with a contagious disease. 

MANUAL LABOR. 

SHOP LABORATORY AND FIELD PRACTICE. 

The following regulations in regard to manual labor have 
been adopted by the Board of Trustees: 

1. The manual labor of students is divided into two kinds, 
viz.: Uninstructive labor, which shall be paid for in money, and 
instructive labor, which shall be compensated by the instruction 
given and the skill acquired. 

2. Uninstructive labor shall comprise all the operations in 
the workshop, the garden, upon the farm and elsewhere, in which 
the work done accrues to the benefit of the College, and not to 
that of the student. Instructive labor shall embrace all those 
operations in the workshop, museum, laboratories, veterinary hos- 
pital, experimental kitchen, upon the farm, garden and experi- 
mental stations, in which the sole purpose is the acquisition of 
knowledge and skill. 

3. Students shall engage in instructive labor in the presence 
and under the instruction of the professor in charge according 
to the statement made in each of the courses of study. 

The compensated labor furnished by the Divisions of Agri- 
culture, Veterinary Medicine and of Engineering, is given by 
each to its own students, and is eagerly sought. The "details" 
of compensated labor supplied by the needs of the various 
departments are given to the most faithful and meritorious 
students in each department. Uninstructive labor is paid for 
according to its value to the College, but no student should 
expect to pay the main part of his expenses by labor while here. 
The College cannot furnish the work, and even if it could, the 
student's time is chiefly needed for study. Still, many worthy 
and industrious students pay a considerable part of their ex- 



52 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

penses by labor, over $4,000 being paid out by the College thus 
each year to students and post-graduate assistants. 

GOVERNMENT. 

The relations of our college buildings, and the nature of the 
exercises, complicated as they are, by laboratory work, shop 
practice and labor, make order, punctuality and systematic effort 
indispensable. This institution, therefore, offers no inducement 
to the idler or self-indulgent. All who are too independent to 
submit to needful authority, or too reckless to accept wholesome 
restraint, are not advised to come. The discipline of the College 
is confined mainly to sending away promptly those who prove 
on fair trial to be of the said class. 

The use of tobacco by students on the college premises is 
forbidden. Those who are already so addicted to its use that 
they cannot cheerfully submit to this regulation are advised not 
to come. Of course the use of intoxicating beverages and of 
profane and obscene language is forbidden. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP. 

Officers and students gather daily in the chapel at 11:45 a. m., 
for public worship. On Sunday morning at 10:45 a discourse is 
given in the chapel by a clergyman invited for the occasion. The 
object of these services is to emphasize and enforce the principles 
of morality and of the Christian religion. Being a state institu- 
tion we give the utmost freedom to all creeds and forms of 
belief, avoiding the controversies of sectarianism. 

The faculty requires on Sundays such conduct and decorum 
in and about the college buildings as befit the observance of the 
Sabbath. 

RELIGIOUS ASSOCIATIONS. 

The Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations 
of the College are voluntary organizations, composed of students 
and members of the faculty. The membership is large. The 
Sunday Bible classes and prayer meetings are under their 
direction, and are well attended and profitable. This voluntary 
Christian influence in the College is strong and healthful. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 53 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Seven literary societies hold their meetings each Friday 
evening, a time kept free from other college functions. These 
societies supplement the literary work of the College, and 
besides provide a training in appearing before an audience such 
as every college graduate needs, a training that is not secured 
in the class room. Every student is advised to join one of these 
societies. The societies collectively constitute the Oratorical 
Association, whose duty it is to provide for four general programs 
each year; an oratorical contest in the fall term, a declamatory 
contest in the spring term, and a joint program at the beginning 
of each term. Six of the societies constitute the I. S. C. Debating 
League, an organization which arranges for inter-society and 
inter-collegiate debates. The inter-society debates call out twen- 
ty-four debaters each term, four from each society, two of whom 
maintain the affirmative and two the negative of a given question 
against opposing teams from other societies. For nine years 
the League has engaged in annual debate with the students of 
the Iowa State Normal School. Last year there was a debate 
with Drake University; this year one has been arranged with 
Iowa College. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Courses of study leading to the following degrees are offered : 

1. The course in Agriculture — Department of Agronomy. 

2. The course in Agriculture — Department of Dairying. 

3. The course in Agriculture — Department of Animal Hus- 
bandry. 

4. The course in Agriculture — Department of Horticulture. 

5. The course in Science and Agriculture. 

Each of the foregoing is a four years' course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture, (B. S. A.). 

6. The course in Veterinary Science, of four years, leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, (D. V. Mi.). 

7. The course in Mechanical Engineering, of four years, 
leads to the degree of Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering, (B. 
M. E.). 

8. The course in Civil Engineering, of four years, leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Civil Engineering, (B. C. E.). 



54 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

9. The course in Electrical Engineering, of four years, leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, 
(B. Sc. in E. E.). 

10. The course in Mining Engineering, of four years, leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering, (B. 
Sc. in Mn. E.). 

11. The course in Science as Related to the Industries, of 
four years, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc). 

12. The course in General and Domestic Science, for women, 
of four years, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science, (B. Sc). 
Women may take any. other course desired. 

13. The course in Domestic Science, of four years, leads to 
the degree of Bachelor of Domestic Science, (B. D. S.). 

For the short courses in Agriculture and Dairying certificates 
properly indicating the completion of certain studies will be given. 

For the short courses in Mining and Ceramics, certificates 
will be given. 

SPECIAL LINES OF STUDY. 

Students taking special work in any of the College courses 
must be at least twenty years of age, must give good and suffi- 
cient reason for desiring such special classification and must 
furnish satisfactory evidence that they are thoroughly prepared 
to pursue the work chosen. Permission to take such special 
course and the subjects included therein must receive the ap- 
proval of the President of the College and the Dean or Head of 
the Department in which the student seeks enrollment. 

Special students when not qualified to enter above the 
Freshman year will be required to take the first year of their 
work from Junior College studies.* During their second year 
they may be admitted to the Senior College studies in accord- 
ance with the rules governing admission to each study or 
course.* 

Special students will be subject to the same rules governing 



♦Special interpretation for Agricultural Students. An exception to this 
rule will be made in case of Animal Husbandry X and XI, which may be taken 
the first year in lieu of Animal Husbandry II and III, which cannot be taken 
until the work in Animal Husbandry I and II has been completed. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 55 

conditions on back work that apply to all other students. Stu- 
dents wishing to change from a regular to a special course either 
in the same or another department will be required to remove 
conditions on back work. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS REGARDING CLASSIFICATION. 

Number of Hours. — No student shall be allowed to classify- 
in more hours than are specified in the catalog for the term of 
the course taken unless he has an exceptionally high record in 
his previous college work and gives satisfactory reason for 
desiring to take the additional study. The taking of such addi- 
tional work is subject to approval by the President of the College 
and the dean or head of the department in which the student is 
enrolled. 

Back Studies. — Students shall be classified in back studies 
in all cases where such studies are taught. Any exception to 
this rule must be for good and sufficient reasons approved by 
the President of the College and the dean or head of the depart- 
ment in which the student is enrolled. Ten hours or more of 
back work will hold a student back in his class. 

Junior and Senior College. — The students are now classified 
in "Junior and Senior Colleges." The "Junior College" is com- 
posed of all students in Academic, Freshman and Sophomore 
years; the "Senior College," of all in the Junior and Senior years. 

Professor E. W. Stanton is Dean of the "Junior College" 
students; Professor C. F. Curtiss is Dean of the "Senior College" 
students in all the agricultural courses and Professor P. G. 
Holden, Vice Dean; Dr. J. H. McNeil is Dean of Veterinary 
students in the "Senior College." 

Professor A. Marston is Dean of students in the "Senior 
College" of all Engineering Courses and Professor G. W. Bissell, 
Vice Dean. The President of the College is acting Dean of 
Junior and Senior students in the courses in general science and 
general and domestic science. Special students take their work 
under direction of heads of departments in which they specialize. 

For information and in classifying, students should write 
or consult personally with the President. 



56 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

GRADUATING THESES. 

The subjects of theses shall be selected under direction of 
the professor in whose department they are written, and sub- 
mitted to the Thesis Committee, with signed approval of the 
Professor, on or before the first Monday in October. 

It is expected that each thesis shall represent an amount of 
work equivalent to at least one exercise per week through the 
Senior Year; that it shall show the result of the student's 
personal study or investigation and be throughout original in 
matter and treatment so far as the nature of the subject will 
permit; that it shall be prepared under the supervision of the 
professor in charge, the student making frequent reports of 
progress and having an outline of matter ready for approval by 
the first week of the last term. 

The thesis, ready for examination and marking, with its 
specific title and the written approval of the professor in charge, 
shall be presented to the Thesis Committee at a date fixed by 
the committee during the four weeks preceding the Commence- 
ment Day. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Graduate and undergraduate students of other colleges will 
be admitted and granted such credits as their work will justify. 
Work of recognized merit that has been taken at colleges or 
universities of good rank and standing will be credited for an 
equivalent amount of work so far as it applies in any of the 
courses offered at this college. Students taking up work in this 
way will consult the heads of departments to ascertain the 
credits to be allowed; these credits may at the option of the 
head of the department, be conditioned on satisfactory work 
during the student's first term in College. 

POST GRADUATE COURSES. 

The advanced degrees which are conferred by the faculty of 
this college are as follows: 

1. The degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture (M. S. A.) 
is open to Bachelors of Scientific Agriculture who are graduates 
of this College or other colleges offering equivalent courses of 
study. 



DIRECTIONS TO CANDIDATES AND STUDENTS 57 

2. The degree of Master of Science (M. S.) is open to 
Bachelors of Science who are graduates of this College or other 
colleges offering equivalent courses. 

3. Professional degrees in Engineering. (See below). 

REGULATIONS FOR MASTER'S DEGREES. 

1. The opportunity for resident study after graduation is a 
privilege granted only upon the recommendation of the President 
with the advice and consent of the committee on post-graduate 
study and the professors in charge of the departments in which 
the studies are to pursued. 

2. Between the baccalaureate degree and the master's 
degree there shall intervene not less than two years, of which 
the candidate shall devote not less than one year (the second 
preferred) to resident study at this College. 

3. Two lines of work shall be selected, designated as major 
and minor studies, the former to be given two-thirds and the 
latter one-third of the time. The major study shall be research 
work, the results of which shall be incorporated in a thesis. 

4. The major and minor studies shall be so selected as to 
support and strengthen each other. 

5. No undergraduate study shall be selected as a major 
study. Undergraduate studies may be taken for part of the 
minor work only with the approval of the committee on post- 
graduate study, and the heads of the departments in which the 
work is to be done. 

6. The candidate shall have a reading knowledge of French 
or German. 

7. Application for graduate study, specifying the depart- 
ments in which the major and minor subjects are to be taken v 
shall be filed with the President within four weeks of the begin- 
ning of the first term's resident work, and not later than October 
1st, next preceding the commencement at which the degree is to 
be granted. 

ADVANCED DEGREES IN ENGINEERING. 

The several departments of the Division of Engineering 
confer the professional degrees as follows: 

In Mechanical Engineering, the degree of Mechanical Engin- 
eer, (M. E.). 



58 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

In Civil Engineering, the degree of Civil Engineer, (C. E.). 

In Electrical Engineering, the degree of Electrical Engineer, 
(E. E.). 

In Mining Engineering, the degree of Mining Engineer, (E. 
M.). 

The above degrees are conferred subject to the following 
regulations : 

Applications for professional engineering degrees will be 
received from graduates of the engineering departments of this 
College or from graduates in engineering from other colleges 
offering equivalent courses of study in engineering. 

To be entitled to the professional degree, the applicant 
therefor shall have devoted not less than one year to resident 
study along lines satisfactory to the engineering faculty, shall 
have been engaged for not less than one year in a responsible 
professional position, and shall present a satisfactory thesis, or 
he shall have been engaged for not less than five years in a 
responsible professional position and shall present a satisfactory 
thesis. 

In this connection a responsible professional position means 
practical engineering experience, requiring the exercise of skill 
or executive ability in designing or construction work. Refer- 
ences or personal knowledge of the facts will be required by the 
engineering faculty. 

Further information as to the lines of work open to graduate 
students can be found under the several courses of study describ- 
ed elsewhere. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



AGRONOMY. 
DAIRYING. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

HORTICULTURE. 

SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 



60 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



ALBERT BOYNTON STORMS, A. M., D. D., 

President. 

JAMES WILSON, M. S. A., 

Lecturer. 

CHARLES FRANKLIN CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director of Experiment Station and Dean of Agriculture. 

PERRY G. HOLDEN, M. S., B. Pd., 

Professor of Agronomy and Vice Dean of Agriculture. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Vice Director of Experiment 

Station. 

GEORGE LEWIS McKAY, 
Professor of Dairying. 

SPENCER A. BEACH, M. S. A., 

Professor of Horticulture. 

ARTHUR THOMAS ERWIN, M. Sc, 

Associate Professor of Horticulture and Forestry. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. B., 
Professor of Soils. 

C. J. ZINTHEO, B. Sc, 

Professor of Farm Mechanics. 

JOHN H. McNEALL, V. M. D., 
Dean of Veterinary Science and Professor of Anatomy and Surgery. 

WALTER A. STUHR, V. ML D., 

Assistant Professor in Pathology and Histology. 

FRANK W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Dairy Bacteriology. 

W. J. RUTHERFORD, B. S. A., 

Associate Professor of Animal Husbandry. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 61 

L. S. KLINCK, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Farm Crops. 

C. LARSEN, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Dairying. 

LOUIS G. MICHAEL, B. S. A., 
Agricultural Chemist. 

WAYNE DINSMORE, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 

G. I. CHRISTIE, B. S. A., 

Aassistant in Soils. 

I. O. SCHAUB, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Soils. 

H. M. BAINER, M. S. A., 

Instructor in Field Engineering. 

EDWARD E. LITTLE, M. S. A. 

Assistant in Horticulture. 

J. W. JONES, 

Assistant in Field Experiments. 

A. C. ATHERTON, 

Assistant in Carpentry. 

JOHN HOOVER, 

Assistant in Shop Work. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc, 

Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

W. F. COOVER, A. B., A. M„ 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Mfilitary Science. 

LOUIS HERMAN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ADRIAN Ml NEWENS, B. O., 
Professor of Public Speaking. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Psychology. 

RICHARD CORNELIUS BARRETT, A. M., LL. B., 

Professor of Civics and Rural Law. 

PAUL SKEELS PIERCE, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of History. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Economic Science. 

*MISS BESSIE B. LARRABEE, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Dl, 

Assistant Professor of English. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. S., 

Instructor in History. 

MISS GRACE NORTON, A. B., 

Instructor in German. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. S., 

Instructor in Zoology. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 
Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS EPFIE ALENE WHITE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ROSE ABEL, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS BLANCHE T. THOBURN, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MOORE, A. M., 

Instructor in English. 



*Granted leave of absence. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 63 

MISS FLORENCE LUCAS, 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 

MISS LISLE McCOLLOM, A. B., 

Instructor in French. 

SYBIL M. LENTNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Germian. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE E. STEVENS, B. L., 
Assistant Librarian. 

MISS DORA G. TOMPKINS, A. M., 

Instructor in English. 



THE DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



CHARLES F. CURTIS S, DEAN. 
PERRY G. HOLDEN, VICE DEAN. 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

' "^jqa 

The instruction in agriculture is divided into the following 
departments : 

I. Department of Agronomy. 
II. Department of Dairying. 

III. Department of Animal Husbandry. 

IV. Department of Horticulture. 

V. Department of Science and Agriculture. 
The courses in these several departments unite in making a 
foundation for the student upon which he can build a successful 
career as a farmer, or develop into a specialist in the many 
possible lines that are branches of the farming industry. The 
studies pursued in each department are equally recognized as 
being necessary to fully equip the student for the highest order 
of work in any division of agriculture, and the only difference 
between the shorter and the longer courses is due to the degree 



64 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

to which the student wishes to specialize and develop himself 
for a single line of work. The farm as it is commonly conducted 
is a union of many divisions of industry and the shorter course 
confines itself to laying a foundation that will secure success in 
all of these, while the longer course seeks to direct the student 
into that line which will call forth and centralize his special 
ability and at the same time enable him to meet the variety of 
conditions that under all circumstances surround a successful life. 

Past experience with the courses of these departments 
shows that they have met with more than the usual success in 
attaining their objects; as the shorter course has been produc- 
tive of many successful farmers, and the longer course has been 
unusually successful in developing better farmers and more 
capable men in practical life and also in securing for our grad- 
uates prominent positions in the agricultural faculties of other 
colleges. 

In practical agriculture, a field unsurpassed by any other 
college in the United States is open to the students. The 
national government gives to the college about thirty-five thou- 
sand dollars annually for original experimentation and instruc- 
tion in agriculture and the sciences related to the industries. 
This supplemented by liberal state aid, enables the College 
authorities to make the fields and the barns veritable laboratories 
of extensive and most practical investigation and observation. 
The range is from the soil that produces, through all of its 
natural characteristics, to whatever is grown in agriculture 
from germ to finish. Two commodious, well-lighted stock judg- 
ing pavilions have recently been constructed, into which live 
animals are brought in the presence of the teacher and the class 
for careful study and intimate knowledge. An experimental barn 
with the recent and most approved methods of stalls, feeding 
and ventilation, is devoted exclusively to the original work of 
animal husbandry and agronomy. This work ranges over all 
the question of breeding and maturing domestic animals. 

The agricultural college is designed to teach the sciences 
that underlie practical agriculture, and sufficient English litera- 
ture, mathematics, history, and other supplementary studies to 
sustain both scientific and practical agriculture and to develop 
the agricultural students to the intellectual level of the educated 
in any profession. Special attention is given to the improved 
method in all of the various operations of farming, farm building, 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 65 

use of tools and machinery, and management of all kinds of 
stock and crops. The instruction of this department embraces 
principles and practice of agriculture. 

The farm consists of 1,040 acres of rolling prairies, bottom, 
and woodland, and is stocked with good representatives of six 
breeds of horses, six breeds of cattle, seven breeds of sheep, 
and six breeds of hogs. These animals are used in class illustra- 
tion and for the various experiments in breeding and feeding for 
milk, meat, wool, growth and maintenance, conducted by the 
Experiment Station as a department of the College. All the 
crops of the farm are grown for some educational purpose; all 
the animals are fed by rule and system, and the result of their 
management reported upon, and used in class work. Labor is 
not compulsory, but students in the agricultural course are 
given work that is educational and parallel with their studies. 
Some students pay for their board by work in the mornings and 
evenings. Under direction of the professor in charge, students 
assist in conducting experiments in lines related to their studies. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY. 



PERKY G. HOLDEN, PROFESSOR OF AGRONOMY, AND VICE-DEAN ; W. H. 
STEVENSON, PROFESSOR OF SOILS; C. J. ZINTHEO, PROFESSOR OF 
FARM MECHANICS. 

L. S. KLINCK, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF FARM CROPS J I. O. SCHAUB, 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOILS; G. I. CHRISTIE, ASSISTANT IN 
SOILS; J. W. JONES, ASSISTANT IN FIELD EXPERIMENTS; JOHN 
HOOVER, ASSISTANT IN SHOP WORK; A. ATHERTON, ASSISTANT IN 
CARPENTRY AND DRAWING; H. M. BAINER, INSTRUCTOR IN FIELD 
ENGINEERING. 

Agronomy is the science of the field and its crops, and treats 
of: (a) Farm Management; the application of economic busi- 
ness methods to farm practices, (b) Field Crops; their class- 
ification, production and improvement, (c) Soils; their fertility, 
cultivation, and improvement, (d) Farm Mechanics; the tools, 
machinery, fences and drains of the farm. 



66 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



COURSES IN AGRICULTURE. 

AGRONOMY. 

Academic Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, Wstern Europe, 5 

Elementary Speech, 2 



(Mathematics, XII.) 

(English, I.) 

(History I.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra & Plane Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, XIII & V.) 
Elementary Botany, 2 (Botany, I.) 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

History, Advanced American, 4 (History, II.) 

Gesture and Voice, 1 (Public Speaking, II.) 

Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5 or 

French, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

History, English, 1 

Military, 2 

Library work, 4 hours per term. 



(Agronomy, I.) 

(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Military, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Field Crops, 5 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 

Solid Geometry, 2* 

German, 5 or 



(Agronomy, II.) 

(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Horticulture, II.) 

(Mathematics, VIA.) 

(Language, VI.) 



*Graduates of accredited schools who are deficient in algebra, but have a 
grade in solid geometry, will take advanced algebra two hours in the Fresh- 
man year in lieu of solid geometry. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



67 



French, 5 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 

Entomology, 2 

Composition, 1 

Military, 2 

Sophomore Year. 



(Language, II.) 

(History, XVIII.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Military, II.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

Farm Mechanics, 5 (Agronomy, III.) 
Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 

Pomology, 3 (Horticulture, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

Meteorology, 3 ( Geology ,1.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Military, 2 (Military, III.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice 
Farm Mechanics, 5 
Forestry, 3 



Histology, 4 
Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 
Military, 2 



(Animal Husbandry, IV.) 

(Agronomy, IV.) 

(Horticulture, XIV.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military, IV.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER, 



Soils, 5 
Chemistry, 4 
Farm Dairying, 3 
Principles of Breeding, 



(Agronomy, V.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 



Elective. 



Advanced Corn and Grain Judging, 2 (Agronomy, XI.) 

Farm Implement Design, 4 (Agronomy, XII.) 

Histology, 2 (Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

Comparative Physiology, 1 '(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

Economic Entomology, 5 (Zoology, IV.) 



68 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Geology, 5 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Political Economy, 5 

Drama, 3 

The Drama in Translation, 2 

Debating, 1 

Advanced Interpretation, 2 

German, 5 or 

French, 5 

History, Europe in 16th, 17th, 18th 

History, The Renaissance, 2 

Military Science, 1 



(Geology, II.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Literature, VIII.) 

(English, VH.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

Centuries, 3 (History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, V.) 



SECOND SEMESTEE. 



Soils, 5 

Research Work, 2 
Bacteriology, 2 



(Agronomy, VI.) 

(Agronomy, VII, IX, or X.) 

(Botany, VH.) 



Elective. 



Advanced Work in Soils, 2 

Comparative Physiology, 1 

Rural Law, 1 

Forestry, 3 

Plant Breeding, 3 

Advanced Public Speech, 1 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

Plane Trigonometry, 3 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

French, 5 or 

German, 5 

Debating, 1 

Rural Architecture, 4 

History, French Revolution and 

History, Constitutional History 



(Agronomy, VII.) 
(Veterinary Science, XXII.) 

(Horticulture, VI.) 

(Horticulture, IV.) 

(Public Speaking, VHI.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, HI.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Mathematics, VLB.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Language, VI.) 

(English, VHI.) 

(Agronomy, XHI.) 

XLXth Century, 3 (History, VI.) 

of England, 2 (History, XI.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



69 



Military Science, 1 
Agricultural Economics, 5 



(Military, VI.) 
(Economics, VIII.) 



Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Farm Management, 3 
Research Work, 2 



(Agronomy, VIII.) 
(Agronomy, VII, IX, or X.) 



Elective. 



Advanced Work in Soils, 2 

Farm Blacksmithing and Horseshoeing, 2 

Dairy Bacteriology, 3 

Chemistry, 4 

Buttermaking, 3 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 3 

Analytic Geometry, 5 

History of Political Economy 

Psychology, 5 

American Literature, 3 

The Short Story, 2 

Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Extempore Speech, 2 

Oration, 1 

French, 4 or 

German, 4 

Landscape Gardening, 2 

History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 

History, Diplomatic History of United States, 2 

Military Science, 1 



(Agronomy, VII.) 

(Agronomy, XV.) 

(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Literature, VT.) 

(Public Speaking, V.) 

(Public Speaking, X.) 

(Public Speaking, IX.) 

(Language, III.) 



(Language, VII.) 

(Horticulture.) 

(History, III.) 

(History, XII.) 

(Military, VII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Thesis Work, 5 
Animal Nutrition, 5 



Advanced Work in Soils, 
Dairying 3 



Elective. 



(Agronomy, XVI.) 
(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 



(Agronomy, VII.) 
(Dairying, I.) 



70 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



(Dairying, XV.) 
(Veterinary Science, XXIV.) 
(Dairying, XVI.) 
(Botany, VIII.) 
(Zoology, IX.) 
(Geology, IV.) 
(Psychology, II.) 
(Mathematics, IX.) 
(Literature, III.) 
(Literature, VII.) 
Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 or (Public Speaking, VI.) 

Adv. Extempore Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, XI.) 

History, The Welding of the Nation, 1845-1900 (History, IV.) 
History, The Far Eastern Question, 2 (History, IX.) 

Astronomy, 5 (Physics, VIII.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 



Cheesemaking, 3 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Technology of Milk, 1 
Advanced Bacteriology, 3 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Geology, 5 
Ethics, 3 
Calculus, 5 

Novel and Romance, 3 
The Essay, 2 



AGRONOMY I. 



FALL SEMESTER. 



Lecture Work. 



The Fall Semester is devoted entirely to the study of corn. 
The lecture work includes an exhaustive study of the best meth- 
ods of selecting, testing, grading, planting, cultivating, harvest- 
ing and storing the crop. The breeding of corn for special pur- 
poses receives careful attention. The characteristics and history 
of the principal varieties grown in the State are studied and their 
adaptability to different districts noted. Considerable time is 
devoted to the commercial handling of corn in addition to a 
study of the cost of production and uses of the crop grown. 

Laboratory Work. 

The first month is spent in studying corn under field condi- 
tions, special attention being given to the study of the influ- 
ence of cultivation on stand and yield; the per cent, of barren 
stalks, broken stalks, smutted stalks and suckers in different 
fields and under different conditions; the per cent, of stand in 
different fields and its influence on yield; studies in growth and 
development of corn grown from seed harvested in different 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 71 

stages of maturity; habit and growth of varieties brought from 
different parts of this state and from -other states; the collecting 
of samples illustrating desirable and undesirable points in ears 
and kernels and the study of location and plans for breeding 
blocks. 

The inside laboratory class work in corn includes: 

(a) Study of individual ears. 

(b) Comparative study of groups of ten ears. 

(c) Judging representative types of varieties grown exten- 
sively in Iowa. 

(d) Study of desirable and undesirable characteristics in 
seed ears. 

(e) Practice in selecting, germinating, and grading corn, 
and calibrating the planter. 

(f ) Commercial grading and handling of the crop. 
Recitations three hours per week. Laboratories six hours 

per week. 

L. S. Klinck. 

AGRONOMY II. 



SPRING semester. 

The lectures in this semester will embrace a study of wheat, 
oats, barley, rye, flax, cow peas, soja beans, grasses, clovers, 
alfalfa, root crops, fibre crops, tuber crops, sugar crops, and 
miscellaneous crops, together with discussions on their adapta- 
tion to soil and climate, preparation of the seed bed, methods of 
selection, harvesting the crop and best methods of storing and 
treating the seeds. 

The principles underlying reproduction, germination, plant 
growth and improvement of crops will be studied at length. 

The laboratory work will include score card practice on 
cereals and forage crops and a study of the weed seeds most 
commonly found in the commercial grades of these grains. 

In the greenhouse laboratory the students will be required 
to make a careful study of the circumstances influencing vitality 
in the various farm seeds as shown by germination tests; meth- 
ods and time of planting; thick and thin seeding; value and im- 
portance of careful seed selection; root systems of different 



72 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

plants in the same and in different soils; different methods of 
culture and cropping and treatment of farm seeds to arrest loss 
by fungus diseases and injurious insects. 

Recitations three hours per week. Laboratories six hours 
per week. 

L. S. Klinck. 

AGRONOMY III. 
Field Engineering. 

(a) Plotting the Farm. — This includes methods of laying 
out the farm, the arrangement of the fields for rotation of crops, 
mapping and plotting the fields, and system of records kept of 
the crops of the different fields. 

(b) Road Construction. — The location and building of roads 
leading to different parts of the farm, the construction of country 
roads such as gravel, dirt, macadam, and oiled roads, and prac- 
tice in using road machinery. 

(c) Farm Location. — The location of the building site, and 
the arrangement of the farm buildings, pastures, water supply, 
garden plots, lawns, etc. 

(d) Fence Construction. — Consisting of setting and testing 
of fence posts, designing gates, operating fence building ma- 
chines, and testing of fence wires. 

(e) Drainage. — The study of the road, field and sanitary 
drainage, the different systems of tile drains, methods of level- 
ing and digging ditches by hand and by machinery, the laying of 
tile, the inspection and filling of tile ditches, the study of open 
ditches, methods of construction, location of drainage districts, 
and the study of drainage laws. 

Sophomore year, First Semester. Recitation, three hours; 
Laboratory, six hours per week. Prof. C. J. Zintheo and H. M. 
Bainer. 

The laboratory work in Agronomy III. and IV. is divided 
into five parts as follows: 

1. Two hours per week throughout the year is devoted 
to drawing, such as lettering, map making, planning of farm 
plots and farm buildings. Also sketching parts of farm ma- 
chinery, reproducing them to scale and making assembled draw- 
ings of machines. 

2. Field Work. — One-half semester of four hours per week 
is devoted to field work in engineering consisting of learning 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 73 

how to use leveling and transit instruments, surveying land, 
leveling for tile ditches and establishing drainage districts. 

3. Carpentry. — One-half semester of four hours per week 
is devoted to wood-work. Practice is had in using carpentry- 
tools and in making neckyookes, whiffletrees, mdels of farm 
buildings and such exercises as will teach the student to do 
the repair work on the farm. 

4. Blacksmithing. — In the blacksmith shop the student will 
learn to iron the articles made in the wood shop, they will also 
learn how to make and temper tools, sharpen plow lathes, and 
to do the general repair work of the farm. One-half semester 
of four hours per week is devoted to this work. 

5. Farm Implement Laboratory. — The laboratory time is 
devoted to assembling, adjusting and testing the various farm 
implements, such as binders, mowers, corn binders, huskers and 
shredders; corn planters and grain drills are calibrated to deter- 
mine the accuracy of dropping the corn and the uniformity of 
sowing the grain. Grain and corn graders are tested. A study 
is made of wagons, buggies, all styles of cultivators, and the 
construction of different machines compared. One-half semester 
of four hours per week. 

AGRONOMY IV. 

Farm Machinery. 

A complete course in the construction of various farm im- 
plements will be given including the elementary principles of 
mechanics. A study of dynamometers, equalizers, methods of 
computing speeds and size of pulleys and belts. The history 
and development of the various farm implements will be traced, 
methods of factory construction discussed and the functions and 
methods of operation of all kinds of machines on the farm will be 
carefully investigated. 

A comprehensive course in traction engines will be given; 
the construction of boilers, steam engines, valves and cylinders 
will be studied and practice given in the firing and cleaning of 
boilers and the operating of engines, etc. Gasoline engines and 
their construction will also receive careful study and practice 
will be had with the different styles of engines. Windmills and 
their construction will be studied and experiments carried on to 



74 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

determine the amount of power to be obtained from windmills 
with different velocities and densities of winds. 

AGRONOMY V.— SOILS. 

Soil Physics. 

This course comprises a study of the origin, formation and 
classification of soils; soil moisture and methods of conserving 
it; soil temperature, and conditions influencing it; soil texture 
as affecting the supply of heat, moisture and plant food; sur- 
face tension, capillarity, osmosis, and diffusion as affecting soil 
conditions; the effect upon the soil and the crop of plowing, har- 
rowing, cultivating, cropping, and rolling; washing of soils and 
methods of preventing the same; preparation of seed beds, culti- 
vation and drainage as affecting moisture, temperature, root de- 
velopment, and the supply of available plant food. 

The work of the class room is designed to give the student 
an opportunity to study the different methods of handling soils 
and the effect of these methods upon the moisture, temperature, 
texture, and productiveness of the soil. 

In addition to the work of the class room six hours each 
week throughout the semester will be devoted to laboratory 
work. A commodious and well appointed soil laboratory has 
been equipped on the first floor of Agricultural Hall. The labor- 
atory is fitted for seventy-five students. The desks, hoods and 
balance room are of the latest design and afford every , oppor- 
tunity for accurate and scientific work. Each student is sup- 
plied with a complete outfit of desk apparatus for individual 
work and has within easy reach, water, gas, steam, and com- 
pressed air. 

The centrifuge, shaker and other pieces of soil apparatus 
are run by individual motors. 

Nearly three thousand dollars have been expended for new 
soil apparatus. The very complete line of apparatus and the 
new laboratory afford unsurpassed facilities for soil work, not 
only for regular students but also for those who desire to pursue 
advanced or post graduate courses. 

The Department of Soils has two large rooms in the new 
greenhouse, which are devoted to pot culture work and various 
lines of soil experimental work. An ample number of plots on 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTUKE 75 

the Station farm are also available for class and experimental 
work. 

Special attention will be given to the mechanical analysis 
of soils by the centrifuge method employed by the Bureau of 
Soils, United States Department of Agriculture. The work will 
also comprise the determination of the specific gravity, apparent 
specific gravity, volume, weight, porosity, water-holding capacity, 
and capillary power of various soils; also a study of the effect 
of mulches on the evaporation of water from the soil and the 
physical effects upon the soil of different systems of rotations 
and of continuous cropping. Junior year. First semester. Three 
recitations and six hours laboratory work per week. Professor 
Stevenson and Mr. Christie. 

AGRONOMY VI.— SOILS. 

Soil Fertility. 

Maintenance of Fertility; Fertilizers and Rotations. — The in- 
fluence of commercial fertilizers, barn-yard manure, and green 
manuring upon the quality and yield of various crops; the effect 
of different crops upon the fertility of the soil and upon suc- 
ceeding crops; different systems of rotation and the effect upon 
the productiveness of the soil of various methods of soil man- 
agement; also a study of the storing, preserving, and application 
of barn-yard manure. 

This work will be supplemented by a study of manures; 
fertilizers, and soils; their composition and agricultural value. 
Pot and field experiments will be conducted to show the influ- 
ence of fertilizers, applied to the soil in different quantities and 
at different times, upon the quality and yield of various crops. 
Leguminous crops as fertilizers and their place in farm rotation. 
A study will be made of special types of soil in different sections 
of the State, such as clay, gumbo, loess, and peat soils in Iowa 
with special reference to the best methods of handling and crop- 
ping these soils. Required: Agronomy V; Chemistry XXV. 
Junior year. Second semester. Three recitations and six hours 
laboratory work per week. Professor Stevenson, Professor 
Schaub, and Mr. Christie. 



76 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

AGRONOMY VII. 
Research Work in Soils. 

This is a course in advanced work in Soils. This course 
is required for Agronomy students who do not take Research 
Work in Farm Crops or Farm Mechanics, and is elective for 
students in Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, and Horti- 
culture, during the second semester of the Junior year and the 
first and second semesters of the Senior year. 

A new soil laboratory for research students has been fully 
equipped during the past year. This addition to the laboratory 
equipment of the Soils Department makes it possible to offer 
advanced students unusual opportunities for individual work. 

The student may choose either of the following lines of 
work which may be pursued for one, two, or three semesters: 

(a) Research Work in Soil Physics. — This course is offered 
for students who desire to pursue advanced work in the study 
of the physical properties of the soils. The Department of Soils 
is well equipped with apparatus for the determination, by elec- 
trical methods, of the temperature, moisture and soluble salt 
content of various soils under actual field conditions. 

When possible field experiments will be conducted to show 
the effect upon the soil conditions of different depths of plowing, 
harrowing, cultivating, rolling, fallowing, and different methods 
of preparation of seed beds. 

A study will be made of the physical properties of the prin- 
cipal types of soils found in the State and of methods of handling 
them and rendering them more productive. Junior year. Second 
semester. Senior year. First and second semesters. Arrange 
time. Required Agronomy V. Professor Stevenson and Mr. 
Christie. 

(b) Research Work in Soil Fertility. — This course is de- 
signed for students who desire to continue their investigation of 
the soil. Problems of special interest regarding the fertility 
and productiveness of particular types or classes of soils will be 
studied. The nature and quantity of the elements of fertility 
in the soils investigated will be determined and pot cultures 
and pot experiments will be conducted to show the effect, upon 
the growth and yield of various crops, of fertilizers added to 
the soil. 



DIVISION OF AGBICTJLTUBE 77 

This work will be supplemented by assigned readings. The 
student will study the results published by authorities on these 
lines of investigations and will also present in written form the 
results of his own investigations and experiments. Junior year. 
Second semester. Senior year. First and second semesters. 
Arrange time. Required Agronomy V. Professor Stevenson and 
Professor Schaub. 

AGRONOMY VIII. 

Farm Management. 

This consists of a study of the different systems of exten- 
sive and mixed farming; the application of business methods to 
farm operations; comparison and study of methods pursued by 
our most successful farmers; division of the farm into fields 
and crop management; circumstances that influence agricul- 
tural practices — soil, climate, machinery, land, tenure, et cetera, 
markets, profits, and losses; executive and commercial problems 
on large and small farms — management of farm help; amount of 
fencing, number and character of live stock as affecting the 
economic management of the farm; relation of farming to other 
occupations; qualifications and requirements for the farm man- 
ager. First semester. Senior year. Professor Holden. 

AGRONOMY IX. 
Research Work in Farm Crops. 

Advantages are offered in this course for the study of spe- 
cial problems relating to cereal, forage, root, and other crops. 
This course is arranged to permit the students to specialize and 
pursue independent investigations with those crops in which he is 
particularly interested. The laboratory work will consist in spec- 
ial experiments conducted by the student in the greenhouses or in 
the fields. These experiments will include such studies as methods 
of testing vitality and purity of commercial seeds ; a study of the 
organs of reproduction in the most common farm crops with 
special regard to their arrangement for close or cross pollina- 
tion; a study of the effects of different treatments and solutions 
of different strengths for fungus diseases in grains, and the time 
and manner of inoculation of different cereals by smut. 

These experiments will be planned and executed by the 



78 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

student. An important consideration in the work will be the 
training of men to plan and systematically carry out definite 
lines of experimental work. The laboratory work will be sup- 
plemented by a study of previous experiments and the prepara- 
tion of a bibliography of such work. 

Required — Agronomy I. II. Ill and IV. Junior year. Second 
semester. Senior year. First semester. L. S. Klinck. 

AGRONOMY X. 
Research Work in Farm Mechanics. 

The student may choose any one of the following lines of 
work: 

(1.) Calibrating Corn Planters. — This consists of a sys- 
tematic study of improving the accuracy of planting corn. Con- 
siderable improvement has already been made on various corn 
planters by the department, and this work will be continued in 
order to still further improve the planters. In connection with 
the testing of planters will be carried on experiments with corn 
graders in order to develop machinery that will grade corn into 
uniform sizes, suitable for the plates of the corn planters. 

(2.) Testing of Grain Drills. — The various makes of grain 
drills will be tested to determine the amount of grain of the 
various kinds sown per acre, and to note how the registers of 
the different drills compare with the results actually obtained. 
Tests will also be made to determine the effect of treating the 
grain with formaldhyde and other liquids, which swell the ker- 
nels, and thus vary the amount of seed passing through the feed 
in a given time. 

(3.) Fence Construction. — This consists in testing the 
strength of material of various kinds of fence posts. The 
strength of cement posts will be compared with that of cedar 
and other kinds of wooden posts, to note their ability to with- 
stand strains. Various methods of attaching fence wire, setting 
fence posts and hanging gates will be investigated. 

(4.) Traction Tests. — The effect of draft on different con- 
ditions and grades of roads for different heights of wheels and 
different widths of tires of farm wagons will be studied and the 
results compared with friction and roller bearing axels on farm 
wagons and other vehicles. 

(5.) Farm Telephones. — This will consist in a study o2 the 



DIVISION OF AGEICULTUEE 79 

various makes of telephones as used in rural districts, and a 
comparison of their efficiency. Practice will be had in the con- 
struction of rural lines and the effect of correct versus wrong 
methods of using phones, will be investigated. 

(6.) Irrigation. — This will consist in plotting irrigation 
fields, leveling land for irrigation purposes, constructing irriga- 
tion ditches and flumes, and applying water by flooding and by 
the furrow system. Actual experiments will be carried on with 
sewage irrigation on the College farm. 

(7.) Drainage Experiments. — Drainage experiments will be 
carried on to note the effect on the amount of moisture in the 
soil from deep and shallow drainage. Special drainage prob- 
lems will be solved where difficult cases occur, such as hillside 
drainage where the water passes over the impervious subsoil. 
The student will be given a field to drain and will be expected 
to determine size of the tile to use and the distance apart of 
the ditches; also make out a contract for the work of putting 
in the tile, covering, the depth of tile, cost of tile, and of digging 
and filling the ditches, as well as all points to be done by the 
drainage engineer. 

(8.) Windmill Experiments. — This will consist in determin- 
ing the amount of available power to be obtained from the wind, 
during different velocities and densities of the wind. Also to 
determine the efficiency of different windmills and to keep a 
careful record of wind velocities during the season by means of 
the anemometer register. Tests will also be made of various 
corn and grain grinders, corn shellers, huskers and shredders 
operated by wind power. 

(9.) Binder Studies. — Various grain and corn binders will 
be studied to compare the efficiency of the knotters in accur- 
acy of tieing bundles. The amount of twine used in the tieing 
of a certain size bundle, the amount of twine wasted in making 
the knot and the effect of tight and loose tension on the amount 
of twine used; the number of pounds compression necessary to 
make tight bundles and a general comparison of efficiency of 
different binders. 

Required for all Research Work. Agronomy III and IV. 
Professor C. J. Zintheo. 



80 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

AGRONOMY XI. 

This course is offered for those who are desirous of fitting 
themselves more thoroughly to become competent grain judges 
at institutes and grain expositions. Six hours laboratory per 
week. Elective. Junior year. First semester. L. S. Klinck. 

AGRONOMY XII. 

Farm Implement Design. 

This course includes the design and construction of imple- 
ments as now used on the farm or the invention of such new 
implements as the experience of the student and the men in 
charge of the Farm Mechanics Department may suggest. The 
strength of the various kinds of materials entering into farm 
implements will be studied and tested in the laboratories and 
experiments will be carried on in the field to determine the 
efficiency of the work done by machines made by the students. 
Elective to all agricultural students who have completed Agron- 
omy III and IV. Prof. Zintheo. 

AGRONOMY XIII. 

Rural Architecture. 

(a) This course embraces the planning of farm buildings, 
farm granaries, silos, machine sheds, living houses; their con- 
struction, cost and conveniences; the study of the different 
stalls, cribs, etc., also testing the strength of building material, 
cements, etc. Complete plans, specifications, and price lists of 
material will be made by the students; the ventilation of build- 
ings will be studied, and the arrangement of windows for lighting 
the buildings will be investigated. During the laboratory period 
work will be done in the drawing room and carpentry shop and 
models of various buildings will be made, and practice given in 
cutting joists, making windows, doors, etc. 

(b) Farm Water Supply. — Including the making of plans 
for and the construction of a system of water supply available 
to all buildings on the farm and such field plots in which water 
is required. It will include the study of the construction and 
the repair of pumps, windmills, water tanks and pipes; practice 
work will be given in pipe fitting, the bracing of collars, the 
repair of leaky valves, and plumbing. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTTJKE 81 

Elective to all agricultural students who have completed 
Agronomy III and IV. Professor Zintheo. 

AGRONOMY XIV. 
Dairy Engineering. 

This course embraces special work in the management, care 
and operation of steam anc gasoline engines. It includes prac- 
tical work in setting valves, caulking boiler flues, repairing 
pumps and injectors, the placing of machinery shafts and belting, 
pipe fitting, bracing of collars, and repair of leaky valves. 

Required of the Dairy students. Sophomore year. First 
Semester. Recitation one hour, laboratory three hours per week. 
Also required by the Short Course students in the Dairy course. 

AGRONOMY XV. 

Farm Blacksmithing and Horse Shoeing. 

This is an advanced course in blacksmithing, elective only 
to senior agricultural students who have completed Veterinary 
XVI. in Horse Shoeing. The course aims to prepare the student 
to teach shop work in rural high schools and other agricultural 
colleges, and also gives an opportunity for such students who 
desire more practice in farm blacksmithing and horse shoeing. 

Six hours of shop work per week with two hours credit 
Fall semester. 

AGRONOMY XVI. 

Thesis. 

Each student in the Agronomy Department is required to 
prepare a thesis in the senior year, representing in the work 
done upon it, the equivalent of a five hour subject for one term. 

This thesis shall be upon some subject requiring original 
work. 

POST GRADUATE WORK IN AGRONOMY. 

I. FARM CROPS. 

This work is planned to give the graduate student training 
that shall prepare him for a position with seed firms, for agri- 



82 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

cultural experimental work, for work along special seed or crop 
lines in the United States Department of Agriculture, or to 
still further prepare him to solve the complex problems of the 
farm. 

Close attention will be given to the study of any special farm 
crop or crops with which the student is desirous of becoming more 
familiar. These crops will be treated fully both from the prac- 
tical and from the scientific standpoint. A large part of the 
student's time will be devoted to original investigations along 
the line of his special study and every facility will be afforded 
for successfully carrying out this work. With large experimental 
fields, well equipped greenhouses and a chemical laboratory for 
advanced work, the graduate student has splendid opportunities 
for pursuing any line of investigation work in Farm Crops which 
he may desire. 

Commercial Judging and Grading of Grains. 

In grain judging and grading the work is entirely along com- 
mercial lines. The object of this course Is to make the student 
thoroughly familiar with the commercial grades of grain and 
prepare him for a position as a grain inspector. If the student 
is a graduate of an institution where work embraced in the pre- 
vious Farm Crops courses, or its equivalent, has not been given, 
an opportunity will be afforded for taking a special course in the 
judging and grading of Cereals and Forage Crops. Should the 
student desire to pursue advanced work in the commercial grad- 
ing of grains, six weeks training under an efficient inspector at 
an important grain center will be required before finishing the 
course. L. S. Klinck. 

II. AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING. 

In order to meet the increasing demand from graduates of 
Agricultural and Engineering colleges, the Farm Mechanics De- 
partment is offering post-graduate work to such students who 
wish to fit themselves for government positions along irrigation 
and agricultural engineering lines. Also for those who wish to 
teach the subject of Farm Mechanics in Agricultural colleges 
and to act as managers and superintendents of farm properties 
and as designers and experimenters with manufacturing and im- 
plement concerns. For such students who wish to fit themselves 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 83 

for these positions, there is a great demand and numerous posi- 
tions are now or will be in the near future open for those who 
are prepared to accept them. 

Post-graduate students may take up any subject for special 
investigation along the line of Agricultural Engineering that 
they are interested in, and for which they are fitted by previous 
training. The following are some of the suggested subjects for 
special investigation: 

(1.) Irrigation. — There are numerous opportunities in the 
field of irrigation engineering. The principles of irrigation will 
be studied carefully and practice will be had in designing and 
constructing flumes and other irrigation appliances. Experi- 
ments will be taken up with irrigation machinery such as the 
various makes of pumps used for the purpose. The motive 
power for irrigation pumps will also be investigated and a com- 
parison made between windmills, gasoline engines, and steam 
engines to learn their efficiency and ability to furnish the cheap- 
est power for irrigation purposes. The department is now 
carrying on experiments with sewage irrigation on the College 
farm which give the students ample opportunity for practical 
work. 

(2.) Farm Architecture. — There is a wide field of useful- 
ness open for those who wish to specialize in Farm Architecture. 
The department offers students a chance to investigate the fol- 
lowing lines: 

I. Designing and constructing farm barns, and other farm 
buildings including complete plans, specifications and contracts, 
as well as estimates of cost of material and labor. 

II. Plans and descriptions of farm buildings. 

1. Location and sanitary conditions. 

2. Water supply. 

3. Heating. 

4. Ventilation. 

Also any other line of investigation of Farm Architecture 
that may seem feasible. 

(3.) Road Construction. — The College has been made the 
State Highway Commission by an act of the last State Legis- 
lature, and the Farm Mechanics Department is well equipped 
with the latest improved road-making tools. It offers ample 
opportunity for students who wish to specialize along this line 



84 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

with the view of becoming highway engineers for which kind 
of training there is now a great demand. 

(4.) Investigations of Farm Implements. — A splendid field 
is open for investigating the construction and efficiency of the 
various kinds of implements used on the farm; to test their 
draft under various conditions and to learn just what machines 
are best suited for certain conditions. 

Also to make a comparison between different makes of 
machines of the same class. The Farm Mechanics Department 
has an equipment of $20,000.00 worth of the most modern and 
up-to-date implements on the market which are placed at the 
disposal of post-graduate students for investigations. The latest 
instruments and dynamometers are also available to the students 
to use in their investigations. Several positions are now open 
with implement manufacturers as expert designers and experi- 
menters of farm implements. College graduates would do well 
to fit themselves for these positions. 

(5.) Farm Motors. — A large field for investigation on farm 
motors. The numerous makes of steam traction engines and 
gasoline engines used for farm purposes make a fruitful field to 
learn just what usage these forms of motive powers can be on 
the farm and to what extent they can be profitably employed in 
doing farm work displacing horses for such purposes. The de- 
partment is equipped with various styles of steam traction en- 
gines with single, double and compound cylinders. Also various 
makes of gasoline engines rating from 2' to 20 horse powers. 
In this field there are openings both with threshing machine 
firms and gasoline engine manufacturers for young men who 
have special training along these lines. 

(6.) Drainage. — For those who wish to fit themselves as 
drainage engineers the Department of Farm Mechanics offers a 
splendid field for investigations. A first class equipment of tran- 
sits and levels is owned by the department as well as water 
meters and other instruments for measuring the flow of water 
in streams and tiles. The department is co-operating with the 
United States Department of Irrigation and Drainage Investiga- 
tion, both in drainage experiments, irrigation and windmill ex- 
periments. 

For the latter the department has several different styles 
and makes of windmills and also an anemometer and anemo- 



DIVISION OP AGRICULTURE 85 

meter register which records the velocity of the wind at all 
times. In the field of drainage there are splendid openings as 
the State of Iowa and other states have just entered on a cam- 
paign of redeeming every acre of unprofitable land that is unfit 
for cultivation on account of the lack of drainage. 

While there are numerous positions in the commercial world 
waiting for men who have completed a post-graduate course in 
Agricultural Engineering, the most fruitful field is to teach the 
subject of Farm Mechanics in the agricultural colleges and 
rural high schools. Numerous institutions are now establishing 
such departments and the men who possess the proper educa- 
tion as well as the practical training to teach the subject are 
sought. 

III. SOILS, 

Study of Soils Fitting for Special Work in United States Bureau 
of Soils, or Colleges and State Experiment Stations. 

The post-graduate work in Soils consists of special lines of 
investigation in Soil Physics and Soil Fertility. The greatest 
freedom, consistent with good work, will be accorded the grad- 
uate student in the selection of the lines of investigation for 
post-graduate work in Soils. This work may be taken in the 
Department of Soils as a continuation of the work begun as an 
undergraduate of this College or of any line of soil work which 
has fitted the student for advanced soil studies. 

I. Soil Physics. — There is no line of work which offers a 
richer field for investigation than Soil Physics. Comparatively 
little is known concerning the fundamental principles which 
underlie physical soil problems. The equipment of the depart- 
ment is such that students can successfully conduct exepriments 
along the lines relating to soil management. The student's 
work in this course will include an exhaustive investigation and 
study of one or more of the following subjects, or of such other 
subjects as may meet the approval of the head of the depart- 
ment: 

1. Physical Nature of Soil. 

2. Mechanical Analysis. 



86 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

3. Relation of Soil to Water. 

4. Water Required by Crops, 

5. Relation of Soil to Heat. 

6. Movements of Salts in the Soil. 

7. Relation of Soil to Air. 

8. Influence of Methods of Tillage on Physical Conditions. 

9. Present Methods of Soil Management. 

10. Soil Types — Their Relation to Crop Production. 

11. Soil Surveys — Methods and Results. 

12. Alkali Lands and Their Treatment. 

13. Treatment of Special Types of Soil to Improve Physical 
Conditions. 

II. Soil Fertility. — This course is designed to meet the 
rapidly increasing demand for graduate work in Soil Fertility. 
Problems of special interest regarding the maintenance of the 
fertility of various types of soils will be studied by the student 
in the laboratory, field and greenhouse. This work will be sup- 
plemented by a study of previous experiments. Special atten- 
tion will be given to the plant food requirements of various 
soils, as shown by analyses, field plot experiments and pot- 
culture investigations. The relation of farm manures and rota- 
tions to the maintenance of fertility will also constitute one of 
the principal lines of research. Work is offered in the follow- 
ing subjects: 

1. Methods of Maintaining the Productive Capacity of the 
Soil. 

2. Rotations. 

3. Composition and use of Manures. 

4. Variation in Composition of Soils. 

5. Pot-Culture Investigations. 

6. The Value of Field Plot Experiments. 

7. Companion Crops, Catch Crops, and Clover Crops in 
Relation to the Maintenance of Fertility. 

8. The Plant Food Requirements of Various Crops. 

9. The Ultimate Effect of Different Systems of Farming 
upon the Fertility of the Soil. 

10. The Comparative Value of Important Types of Soils 
Based upon Composition. 

11. The Improvement of Sandy, Peaty, and Loess Soils. 
Arrange time. Professor Stevenson. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 87 

SHORT COURSE IN CORN AND GRAIN JUDGING, 
JANUARY 1 TO 13, 1906. 

During the winter vacation a two week's course in corn 
and grain judging will be given. This course is planned with 
special reference to meeting the demand for work along these 
lines by the farmers of the State who are not able to take 
advantage of the work in the regular College course. A fire- 
proof two-story stock and grain judging pavilion has been erected 
for this work. Instruction will be given in the methods of 
selecting, testing, and preparing seed corn for planting. 

Instruction will also be given in the methods of cultivation, 
characteristics and adaptability of different varieties of corn to 
the various sections of the State. 

A comparison of corn cultivators, and of planter tests with 
both rotary and edge-drop planters, will be made. Samples of 
all the leading varieties of corn grown in Iowa will be on ex- 
hibition and will be used for corn judging purposes. 

Those wishing to become corn judges qualified to judge 
corn at farmers' institutes, fairs, and expositions, will have 
an opportunity at this corn school to prepare for this work. 
An examination will be held at the close of the school, and 
corn and judging certificates will be issued, by the Iowa Corn 
Growers' association, to those who prove themselves proficient. 
The importance of being able to select good seed for next year's 
crop can scarcely be overestimated. 

To partially cover the expense of additional instructors and 
facilities for judging, a tuition fee of $3.00 will be charged to 
residents and $5.00 to non-residents, but one fee will cover the 
instruction in both stock and corn judging. The work during the 
course will be so arranged that the student's time will be equally 
divided between corn and stock judging. 

DEPARTMENT OF DAIRYING. 

G. L. m'kAY, PROFESSOR OF DAIRYING. 

C. LARSEN, M. S. A., ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

F. W. BOUSKA, M. S. A., ASS'T. PROFESSOR, DAIRY BACTERIOLOGIST. 

The Dairy Department carries on two kinds of work. (I.) 
Experimentation, which has for its purpose investigation and 
discovery of facts in relation to dairying; (II.) instruction and 
training to fit men for various callings in dairying. 



88 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Those who desire to take work in the Dairy Department 
usually wish to qualify themselves to pursue work in the follow- 
ing occupations: 

1. As teachers and investigators of dairying in agricultural 
colleges and experiment stations, inspectors of creameries and 
dairy products in municipal, state and government service, 
superintendents of large creameries, and managers of dairy 
farms which produce sanitary and modified milk on a large scale. 

2. As operators of creameries, cheese factories, central 
plants, and dairy farms. 

3. Some experienced dairy and creamery men come with 
the intention of devoting only a comparatively short time to 
special phases of the subject. 

The rapid progress and the application of scientific prin- 
ciples in the dairy industry render it imperative for men who 
are engaged in dairy work to keep in touch with new ideas and 
principles. In order to meet these demands the Dairy Depart- 
ment has outlined the following different courses: 

First, a four-year course with the view of qualifying students 
for such work as mentioned above under the first heading. 

Second, a one year course to satisfy the demands of those 
who wish to fit themselves for such work as mentioned under 
the second heading. 

Third, a two weeks' course, intended for men who can leave 
their work for only a short time to acquaint themselves with 
methods and investigations which they cannot learn in their 
own factories. 

New Dairy Building. 

At the last session of the Iowa Legislature, money was 
appropriated for a new dairy building, a dairy farm and a herd 
of dairy cows. With these additional equipments the Dairy 
Department provides for a more thorough and broader training 
than ever before. 

The new building is a three-story building with a basement 
and attic. Its dimensions are 110x60 feet. It is built of buff 
pressed brick, trimmed with Bedford stone. On the inside it is 
wainscoted with enamel brick. It is entirely fire proof. On the 
ground floor are located the factory butter and cheese rooms, bot- 
tling room, testing room, refrigerators, lunch room, toilet and 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 89 

bath rooms. On the first floor are the offices, research labora- 
tory, farm dairy room, students' testing laboratory, and a lec- 
ture room. The rooms on the second floor are devoted mostly 
to dairy bacteriology. The dairy library and reading room are 
also on this floor. The building will be heated, ventilated, and 
the cold storage rooms refrigerated according to the most mod- 
ern methods. 

Dairy Farm. 

The dairy farm is located near the College. It comprises 
200 acres of choice land. It will be stocked with various types 
and breeds of milk cows. The milk from this herd will supply 
the needs of the creamery. Besides this, milk and cream will 
be handled commercially, being hauled or shipped to the 
creamery. 

The College creamery is in operation the year around. The 
work is conducted on a practical scale as well as for scientific 
investigation and instruction. The product made invariably 
brings the highest quotations and has attained an enviable repu- 
tation in the markets of the United States and England. 

The facilities for teaching Dairying in a thoroughly prac- 
tical and scientific manner are unexcelled. The building is 
exceptionally well equipped for practical work as well as scien- 
tific instruction and investigation. It is more than a "Dairy 
Building" as the term is generally understood. It is a practical 
working creamery and cheese factory in operation every work 
day of the year. A portion of the milk is purchased from 
farmers living in the vicinity of the College and they are paid 
for it according to its merits, based not only on butter fat de- 
termined by the Babcock test, but on inspection of its cleanliness, 
freedom from all taints, objectionable odors and other general 
qualities. A bacteriological laboratory offers facilities for in- 
struction and investigation in this important feature of the sub- 
ject. 

The student becomes familiar with everything connected 
with the management of a commercial creamery and meets every 
problem that is likely to confront him in his after work. All 
leading types of separators are used in the dairy building and 
the most approved machinery is used throughout by the students. 

During the latter part of the senior year those students who 



90 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

have shown themselves capable are permitted to spend a portion 
of their time in the laboratory in original work, and meritorious 
work of this kind is reported in the bulletins of the Experi- 
ment Station. 

The Short Courses in Dairying are established for the 
benefit of those who are already engaged in the business, either 
on the farm or in the creamery or factory, and for this reason 
a very large portion of the time is devoted to practical work in 
the dairy building. 

Students in these courses are taught everything connected 
with practical work, from weighing the milk brought in by the 
different patrons and testing the same, to running the engines, 
scrubbing the floors and shipping the butter. The aim is to 
teach not only how to do all the work incidental to a business 
of this kind, but also why, — the reason, — the work should be 
done in the manner taught. The studies other than dairying 
proper which appear in the courses outlined are such as are 
necessary to a correct understanding of the principles involved, 
and all students entering these courses are required to attend 
them regularly. 

Students in all of the dairy and creamery work are required 
to provide themselves with white suits, keep them clean and 
in good order. 

DAIRYING. 
Academic Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, XII.) 

English, 5 (English, I.) 

History, Western Europe, 5 (History, I.) 

Elementary Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, I.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Algebra and Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, V. and XIII.) 

Elementary Botany, 2 (Botany, I.) 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

History, Advanced American History, 4 (History, II.) 

Gesture and Voice, 1 (Public Speaking, II.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



91 



Freshman Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

Market and Home Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 

History, English, 1 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

Military, 2 

Library Work, 4 hours. 

SECOND SEMESTER. 



(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Horticulture, IH.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(Agronomy, I.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(English, III.) 

(Military, I.) 



Livestock and Score Card Practice, 

Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 

Solid Geometry, 2* 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Farm Crops, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Composition, 1 

Military, 2 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 



2 (Animal Husbandry, n.) 

3 (Horticulture, IIH.) 
(Mathematics, VIA.) 

(Language, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

English, IV.) 

(Military, II.) 

(History, XVEH.) 



Sophomore Year. 



FIEST SEMESTER. 



Livestock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, HI.) 



Orcharding, 3 
Chemistry, 5 
Farm Dairying, 3 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Horticulture, IIIH.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

(Dairying, XCI.) 

(Botany, H.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, IV.) 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemiwtry, XXH[.) 

♦Graduates of accredited schools who are deficient in algebra, but have a 
grade in solid geometry, will take advanced algebra two hours in the Fresh- 
man Year in lieu of solid geometry. 



92 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Cheese Making, 3 
Milk Testing, 3 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 
Bacteriology, 2 
Dairy Engineering, 2 



(Dairying, XV.) 

(Dairying, XIII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military IV.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Agronomy, XIV.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Advanced Butter Making, 4 
Principles of Breeding, 2 
Chemistry, 4 



(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Animal Husbandry, Vin.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 



Live Stock Management, 

Histology, 2 

Comparative Physiology, 1 

Physiography, 3 

Shop Work, 1 

Surveying, 4 

Photography, 2 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 

Economic Botany, 2 

Economic Entomology, 5 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

Drama, 3 

The Drama in Translation, 2 

Debating, 1 

Advanced Interperlation, 2 

French, 5 or 

German, 5 

History, 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries, 3 

History, The Renaissance, 2 

Military Science, I 



Elective. 

2 (Animal Husbandry, XI.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXXm.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Fancy Cheese Making, 3 
Technology of Milk, 1 



(Physics, XIV.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Geology, H.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Literature, VIII.) 

(English, Vn.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(French, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 



(Dairying, XXIV.) 
(Dairying, XVI.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 93 

Chemistry, 4 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 

Elective. 

Livestock Management, 2 (Animal Husbandry, XII.) 

Animal By-Products and Herd Books, 2 (Animal Husbandry, VII.) 



Farm Mechanics, 5 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Advanced Public Speech, 1 
Roads and Pavements, 2 
Plane Trigonometry, 3 
Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 
Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 
Histology, 4 
Mineralogy, 4 
Finance, 3 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 
Expression in Oratory, 2 
French, 5 or 
German, 5 
Debating, 1 



(Agronomy, IV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Public Speaking, VEIL) 

(Civil Engineering, XIH.) 

(Mathematics, VIB.) 

(Botany, Xn.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Botany, HI.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Languages, H.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(English, VTII.) 



History, The French Revolution & 19th Century, 3 (History, VI.) 
History, Constitutional History of England, 2 (History, XI.) 
Military Science, 1 (Military, V.) 

Advanced Work in Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 

Agricultural Economics, 5 (Economics, VIII.) 

Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Dairy Bacteriology, 4 
Scoring Butter and Cheese, 1 
Research Work, 2 



Elective. 



(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XVIII.) 

(Dairying, XIX.) 



Comparative Physiology, 2 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Agrostology, 2 

Evolution of Plants, 1 

Geology, 5 

Analytic Geometry, 5 



(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Mathematics, Vin.) 



94 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Political Economy, 3 

History of Political Economy, 2 

Psychology, 5 

American Literature, 3 

The Short Story, 2 

Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Extempore Speech, 2 

Oration, 1 

French, 4 or 

German, 4 

History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 



(Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Literature, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, V.) 

(Public Speaking, X.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(History, III.) 



History, The Diplomatic History of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VII.) 

Advanced Work in Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 

SECOND SEMESTEE. 



Factory Management, 4 
Preparation of Ice Cream and Ices, 
Animal Nutrition, 5 
Sanitary Science, 2 
Thesis, 2 

Elective. 



(Dairying, XX.) 

L (Dairying, XXI.) 

(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

(Veterinary Science, XLV.) 

(Dairying, XXIII.) 



Comparative Physiology, 2 

Dairying 3, 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Calculus, 5 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 

Geology, 5 

Ethics, 3 

Novel and Romance, 3 

The Essay, 2 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Advanced Extempore Speech, 2 

History, Welding of the Nation, 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 

Astronomy, 5 



(Veterinary Science, XXIV.) 

(Dairying, I.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Mathematics, LX.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Psychology, II.) 

(Literature, 111.) 

(Literature, VTI.) 

(Public Speaking, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, XI.) 

1845-1900, 3 (History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 

(Physics, VIII.) 



Chemistry, 5 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 



DIVISION OF AGKICULTUEE 95 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

Advanced Work in Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 

Rural Law, 1 (Civics, V.) 

Course I. — Dairy Practice. — This consists of five to seven 
hours of practical work in cheesemaking per day, First Semester 
of one year course. In the Second Semester of the year course 
it includes practical work in buttermaking. Professor McKay. 

Course II. — Buttermaking. — This course is a one hour study 
in the Second Semester of the year course. It includes a study 
of the composition of milk and dairy products, the principles of 
gravity and centrifugal separation of cream, a consideration of 
the principles of cream ripening, preparation of starters, churn- 
ing, and the preparation of butter for the market. This course 
cannot be substituted for Course XIV. Mr. Larsen. 

Course Ml. — Milk Testing. — 1 hour, Second Semester of year 
course. It includes a thorough study of the Babcock test for 
dairy products, with special attention for overcoming difficulties 
arising from varying conditions. The tests (Farrington's and 
Manns') for determining the acidity of cream and milk, and the 
use of the lactometer for detecting adulterations, are included. 
Also composite sampling and testing of individual cows. This 
course cannot be substituted for Course XIII. Mr. Larsen. 

Course V. — Book Keeping. — This course is designed to give 
the students the best form of bookkeeping for the business of 
the factory. One hour a week, Second Semester year course. 

Course VI. — Dairy Bacteriology. — This course of twenty lec- 
tures is for students in the short dairy course. The application 
of bacteriological knowledge in the care of milk, in butter mak- 
ing, and in cheese making is taught in a simple and practical 
manner. This course cannot be substituted for Course XVTI. 
in the Four Year Dairy Course. First Semester, one year course. 
Mr. Bouska. 

Course VII. — Breeding and Judging Dairy Stock. — (Animal 
Husbandry). In this course the judging of dairy stock with 
the score card and by comparison is made a leading feature, 
while the lectures relate mostly to the principles, methods and 
practice of breeding dairy stock and their improvement. It is a 
two hour study during the Second Semester of the year course. 
Professor Kennedy. 

Course VIII. — Cheesemaking. — This study is given during 



96 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the First Semester of the one year course. Sixteen lectures are 
given and in addition to this, six lectures on fancy brands of 
cheese, including Limburger, Brick, Swiss, Roquefort, Sage, 
Stilton, Pineapple and Gouda. Professor McKay. 

Course IX. — Scoring Butter and Cheese. — These lectures are 
designed to give the student a correct idea of the standard 
market requirements for dairy products. Butter and cheese are 
examined and scored by the students, and their judgment com- 
pared with that of the instructor. It comprises ten lectures 
during the First Semester to one year students. Professor 
McKay. 

Course X. — Feeding Dairy Stocks — (Animal Husbandry). 
First Semester, one year course. Special attention is given in 
this course to the principles of feeding animals for the most 
economical production, with the composition and use of various 
feeding materials and the feeding of dairy cows, including the 
influence of various feeding stuffs on the quantity, quality and 
composition of milk, butter and cheese. Second Semester, one 
year course. Mr. . 

Course XI. — Dairy Chemistry. — (Chemistry). The chemical 
composition and methods of analysis of dairy products is con- 
sidered in a general manner. The adulterations of butter, cheese 
and milk are also taken up in the lectures. It is given in sixteen 
lectures in the First Semester of the one year course. Mr. . 

Course XII. — Farm Dairying. — This is a required study for 
all four year agricultural students. First Semester, Sophomore 
year. Optional study in course for women. Two class recitations 
and one laboratory period per week. The class work takes up 
the composition and secretion of milk, separation of milk 
by gravity and centrifugal force, the Babcock test for 
the determination of fat, preparation of starters, ripening of 
cream, and churning and packing butter. As this course has 
been planned to give the students a knowledge of dairying in 
general, only one laboratory period per week will be involved. 
The working of the Babcock test, detecting adulteration of milk, 
testing for acidity, and buttermaking as practiced in the best 
modern dairies will be taken up, and demonstrated in the labora- 
tory. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XIII. — Milk Testing. — This includes a thorough 
study in the use of the Babcock test for dairy products, with 
special attention to overcoming the difficulties resulting from 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 97 

varying conditions. The tests (Farrington's and Manns') for 
determining acidity of cream and milk, and the use of the 
lactometer for detecting adulterations, are included. Also com- 
posite sampling and testing of individual cows, and the influences 
and detection of different preservatives and adulterants. It con- 
sists of two recitations per week and one laboratory. Sopho- 
more year, Second Semester. At least one term of Chemistry 
is required. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XIV. — Advanced Buttermaking. — This course consists 
of three recitations and one laboratory per week. It comprises a de- 
tailed and thorough study of the physical and chemical properties 
of milk and its components. It takes up the secretion and com- 
position of milk, principles of separation of cream by gravity 
and centrifugal separators, effects of different degrees of acidity 
of cream upon the quality of butter, and the principles of 
churning, packing and marketing butter. The laboratory periods 
are devoted to practical work in the creamery. How to operate 
the leading types of separators and churns and how to prepare 
tubs and butter so as to procure the best keeping qualities of it 
are some of the subjects which will receive special attention in 
the laboratory. General Bacteriology and one term of Chemistry 
are pre-requisites. Junior year, First Semester. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XV. — Cheesemaking. — This course involves one reci- 
tation and two laboratory periods per week. The class work 
takes up the importance of the quality and composition of milk 
as it relates to the manufacture of Cheddar cheese. The prin- 
ciples involved in cutting, heating, milling, salting and pressing 
the curd, curing and marketing. The influence of organized and 
unorganized ferments in the making and curing of cheese; the 
ventilation and construction of cheese curing rooms are also 
taken up. Second Semester, Sophomore year. Professor McKay. 

Course XVI. — Technology of Milk. — Second Semester, Junior 
year, one hour study. The course is intended to give the student 
a general knowledge of the different ways in which milk and its 
products are utilized outside of the scope ordinarily considered 
under dairying. Such subjects as the preparation of condensed, 
certified, modified and hygenic milk. It also includes the study 
of the food value of milk and its products, in comparison with 
other common foods, preparation and utilization of milk sugar 
and casein. Some Bacteriology and Chemistry are prerequisites. 
Mr. Larsen. 

7 



98 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XVII. — Dairy Bacteriology. — Fall Semester, four 
hours. Two lectures and two laboratories per week are given 
on this subject. The students taking this course are required 
to have a knowledge of chemistry and general bacteriology. The 
lectures take up the function of bacteria and the application of 
bacteriological principles in dairy processes. The object ot the 
laboratory work is to familiarize the student with a few typical 
dairy fermentations, and to train him in the use «£ laboratory 
methods. — Mr. Bouska. 

Course XVIII. — Scoring Butter and Cheese. — First Semester, 
Senior year, one hour study. The lectures are designed to give 
students a correct idea of the standard market requirements for 
dairy products. Butter and cheese are examined and scored by 
the students, and their judgment compared with that of the 
instructor. Professor McKay. 

Course XIX. — Research Work. — First Semester, Senior year, 
two hours a week. This course has been planned for the ad- 
vanced students in dairying. It consists of looking up recent 
work done on dairy subjects by the experiment stations. Also 
to read and study the different books on dairying, written by 
various authorities on assigned topics. General Bacteriology, 
Dairy XIV and XV are prerequisites. A reading knowledge of 
French and German is recommended. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XX. — Factory Management. — Second Semester, Sen- 
ior year, a four hour study. This course, together with the 
knowledge the student already has," is intended to qualify a stu- 
dent to superintend or manage any large factory or dairy 
establishment. It consists of two lectures per week and work 
in the creamery equivalent to two laboratory periods per week. 
The class work will include such subjects as the location and 
construction of creameries, drainage and ventilation of factories, 
how to treat the skim milk and other by-products in order to get 
the best economic results and different methods of creamery 
refrigerations. It is advisable for the student to put in the 
laboratory work during vacation or some other time when the 
work can be done during consecutive days. Course XIV is a 
prerequisite. Ten lectures are given on this subject to students 
in one year course, Second Semester. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XXI. — Preparation of Ice Cream and Ices. — This 
course consists of lectures and laboratory work. They are 
combined in such a way as to give the student the best under- 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 99 

standing possible concerning the preparation of ice cream, 
sherbets, and ices, as made on a private and commercial scale. 
Senior year, Second semester, one hour study. Mr. Larsen. 

Course XXII. — Milk Inspection. — Second Semester, two 
hours. Sixteen lectures and sixteen laboratories are devoted to 
this study. 

In the economical phase of the subject is taught the use of the 
Babcock test and the lactometer in detecting watered or skimmed 
milk. Under the sanitary phase come infectious diseases carried 
by milk, and the detection of preservatives. The legal aspect of 
such work is also considered. 

Course XXIII. — Thesis. — The work on thesis must be original 
work on some dairy subject. The students should consult the 
professor in charge concerning their subject before or after the 
beginning of their senior year. The bacterial and chemical 
laboratories in connection with the creamery plant offer special 
facilities to the student for doing original work. Frequently 
arrangements can be made with the department for co-operation 
in working out important subjects, and if the work is deemed 
meritorious it will be published in bulletin form. The thesis 
work must represent time equivalent to a two hour study during 
the second semester of the Senior year. 

Course XXIV. — Making of Fancy Cheese. — One lecture and 
two laboratories per week. Second Semester, Junior. This 
course takes up the making of those varieties commonly found 
in the American market, namely: Limburger, Brick, Swiss, 
Roquefort, Sage, Stilton, Pineapple, Gouda, Gorgonzola, and 
Neuchatel. Professor McKay. 

One Year Course in Dairying. 

The one year course in dairying is designed to meet the 
wants of those who wish to acquire an intimate knowledge of 
practical dairy methods and the underlying principles as well as 
of the sciences related thereto. This course runs through one 
college year, beginning in September and ending in June. Stu- 
dents completing this course will be given certificates when 
evidence is furnished that they have for one year successfully 
operated a creamery or other dairy establishment. No other 
certificates will be given for any course in dairying except to 
students entitled to a diploma for the four years course in 



100 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

agriculture. The following is the course of study pursued: 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Dairy Practice, 6 days per week (Dairy, I.) 

Cheese Making, 16 lectures (Dairying, VIII.) 

Feeding Dairy Stock, 20 lectures (Dairy, X.) 

Dairy Chemistry, 16 lectures (Dairy, XL) 

Scoring Butter and Cheese, 10 lectures (Dairy, IX.) 

Bacteriology of Milk, 20 lectures (Dairy, VI.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Dairy Practice in Butter Making, 6 days per week (Dairy, I.) 

Buttermaking, 16 lectures (Dairy, II.) 

Milk Testing, 16 lectures (Dairy, III.) 

Bookeeping, 16 lectures (Dairy, V.) 

Breeding and Judging Dairy Stock, 30 lectures (Dairy, XII.) 

Factory Management, 10 lectures (Dairy, XX.) 

Dairy Engineering, 2 (Agronomy, XIV.) 

Two Weeks Course in Dairying. 

The prominent rank attained by students of the Iowa Dairy 
School in state and national contests has led to a demand for 
special instruction. The Short Course will begin January 2, 1906, 
and continue for two weeks. The subjects that will receive 
special attention during this time are: (Preparation of com- 
mercial and natural starters, ripening of cream, judging and 
scoring of cream and butter, and how best to treat the hand 
separator cream). This latter subject was a special feature of 
our last year's course. Hand separator cream will be shipped 
in to the College Creamery during this course, and treated in 
different ways with a view of making the best possible quality of 
butter from a given quality of cream. No one but experienced 
butter makers will be admitted to this course. The fees for this 
course are $12.00, which is intended to cover expenses involved 
in securing extra instructors, and material for the instruction. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 101 

Graduate Course in Dairying. 

This department is especially equipped to offer graduate 
work to advanced students in dairying. In connection with the 
creamery, which is in operation the whole year, there is in the 
same building a well equipped laboratory for dairy chemistry, 
as well as for dairy bacteriology. Opportunities for original 
investigational work in dairying are offered in the following 
lines : 

Dairy Bacteriology. 

For graduate work in Dairy Bacteriology a knowledge of 
general bacteriology and chemistry is required, and a reading 
knowledge of German is recommended. Work can be done on 
the following phases of the subject: 

I. Economic. 

1. In Milk and Cream: Methods of Milking, Care of 

Milk and Preservation of Milk. 

2. In manufacturing Processes. 

(a) Butter making: Cream Ripening and Starters. 

(b) Cheese making: Ripening of Milk, Starters, 

Quality of different makes of cheese. 

(c) Manufacture of Process Butter and Oleomargar- 

3. In Derivatives of Milk, i. e., finished products, 
fa) Butter: Pasteurized, Raw Cream, Washed, and Un- 
washed. 

(b) Cheese: Effect upon Curing and Quality. 

II. Sanitary. 

1. Fermentations producing poisonous substances in 

dairy products. 

2. Transmission of diseases by dairy products. 

III. Technical. 

Devising and testing of methods in dairy bacteriology. 

Dairy Research. 

Under this heading investigations relating to the several 
subjects mentioned below in creamery work are included: 

I. Receiving and Sampling Milk and Cream. — The extensive 
use of hand separators throughout the West and the receiving of 
hand separator cream, gravity cream and whole milk at one 



102 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

creamery plant have given rise to several interesting practical 
questions in connection with receiving and sampling of the above 
mentioned dairy products. Degree of economy in grading differ- 
ent qualities of cream and milk; shall the cream patrons receive 
more per pound for fat than the whole milk patrons and if so, 
how much? Different methods of sampling cream and milk and 
comparative studies of the degree of efficiency and economy in 
the use of the different preservatives for composite sample are 
some of the subjects which may be suggestive to students, under 
the above heading. 

II. — M ilk Testing. — This embraces a comparative study of 
the different tests of dairy products, viz.: Gravimetric, Babcock, 
Gerber, oil test and the space system. The testing for adulter- 
ation of milk is studied from two standpoints: (1) From the 
standpoint of detecting adulterations made with a view of de- 
frauding buyers and customers, and (2) with a view of detecting 
adulterations that effect the health of people when added to 
dairy products. This latter includes the different preservatives. 

III. — Separation and Pasteurization of Cream and Milk. — 
Such subjects as Pasteurization of Different Qualities of Cream 
and Milk: If Pasteurization is Employed, Shall it be Done Before 
or After Separation; Degree of Economy in Pasteurization; Dif- 
ferent Methods of Pasteurization and Comparative Studies of Dif- 
ferent Types of Separators, are some of the most important ones 
which can be studied under the above heading. 

IV. — Cream Ripening. — A Comparative Study of Different 
Ripening Temperatures; How May Different Qualities of Cream 
be treated in order to Obtain the Best Ripening Results; How 
Much and What Kind of Starters shall be used for Different 
Qualities of Cream, and Quick Ripening vs. Slow Ripening, are 
some of the phases of cream ripening which can be taken up 
advantageously. 

V. — Churning, Washing, Salting and Working Butter. — In 
connection with this topic a large number of important subjects 
for investigation, which bear directly upon the commercial value 
of butter, could be mentioned. Among them are: Effects of 
Richness of Cream; Temperature, and Different Amounts of 
Churning upon Quality and Quantity of Butter; Economic Aspect 
of Brine Salting Versus Dry Salting under Different Conditions; 
Amount of Salt to Use for Storage, and for Butter Which is to be 
used Shortly alter Its Manufacture; Effect of Different Qualities 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 103 

of Water Used for Butter Washing, and Extent and Different 
Methods of Working. 

VI. — Packing and Marketing of Butter. — Subjects which can 
he included under this heading are: The Most Economical Way 
of Placing Butter on the Market; A Comparative Study of Differ- 
ent Methods of Treating Tubs for Prevention of Molds and What 
Are the Losses Sustained from Printing the Butter at Different 
Degrees of Firmness. 

The above mentioned subjects are not comprehensive in 
their scope. They can be modified or changed to include more or 
less as the occasion demands. They are intended for suggestions 
only. 

Factory Management. 

As a whole this subject is intended to embody the conditions 
outside of butter making proper which are to be considered in 
order to obtain the greatest possible degree of economy in the 
operation of a large dairy or some large factory. Among some 
of the subjects may be mentioned: Organization of Creameries; 
Location, Drainage, Ventilation and Construction of Creamery 
and Dairy Buildings; Mechanical Versus Natural Ice for Refrig- 
eration; Different Methods of "Utilizing the Various By-Products 
in Creameries, and how to avoid the many losses so incidental 
to creamery management. 

Milk Production. 

The work along this line is facilitated by reason of having in 
connection a large herd of cows. Subjects, such as the Greatest 
Economic Production of Milk with Special Reference to Indi- 
viduality and Breeds of Cows; The Effect of Different Feeds 
Upon the Quality of Dairy Products, and the Environmental 
Conditions Affecting the Quantity and Quality of Milk, are 
included. 

Cheese Making. 

In this course is offered advanced work in the manufacture 
of Cheddar cheese, the chemical and bacteriological laboratories 
are open for research work to students pursuing work in this 
course. The Dairy building has rooms and special facilities for 
the different steps in the manufacture and curing of cheese. 



104 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

WILLABD J. KENNEDY, PROFESSOR. 

W. J. RUTHERFORD, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

WAYNE DINSMORE, INSTRUCTOR. ' 

W. W. SMITH, ASSISTANT. 

C. W. RUBEL. B. S. A. GRADUATE ASSISTANT. 

J. A. CONOVER, ASSISTANT. 

JOHN GOSLING, KANSAS CITY, MO., NON-RESIDENT LECTURER. 

The department of Animal Husbandry stands for all lines 
of work which pertains to the judging, selecting, breeding, 
feeding, development, and care and management of the various 
breeds and classes of domesticated animals. Because of the 
importance of the live stock industry to the welfare of the state, 
and, on account of the unusual quest from students for instruc- 
tion along this line, nothing within our power has been left 
undone to make the equipment for instruction purposes complete 
in every detail. 

The herds and flocks were very carefully established at an 
early date. Prom time to time valuable additions in keeping 
with modern ideas have been made until, at the present time, 
almost every recognized market class of animal and good repre- 
sentatives of all the recognized breeds are available for the 
purpose of instruction. An equipment of this kind places us in a 
position to do work along Animal Husbandry lines which cannot 
be accomplished in those institutions where proper specimens of 
stock are not furnished. We are firmly convinced that there 
is but one way to make a young man a proficient judge of live 
stock, and that is by training his eye. In all of the lecture and 
laboratory work outlined in our courses the work is demon- 
strated by the use of living specimens. 

The offices and lecture rooms of the department are located 
on the first floor of Agricultural Hall. The museum, containing 
a complete assortment of the various kinds of wool, woolen ma- 
terials, animal by-products, and feed stuffs, is located on the 
third floor of the same building. 

The judging pavilions are located near the barns. In this 
respect we are most fortunate in having two excellent, commo- 
dious judging pavilions. This allows us to divide our classes, 
which have in the past been unusually large, into many sections, 
thus affording an excellent opportunity for individual work. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 105 

These buildings are well lighted and heated, and are arranged in 
every way for the convenience and comfort of those who take the 
work. 

An excellent collection of horses representing all the market 
classes and the breeds of both light and heavy types is main- 
tained for instructional purposes. Among these are good repre- 
sentatives of the Shires, Percherons, Clydesdales, French Coach- 
ers, Hackneys, Standard breds, and American Saddle Horses. 
Some of the horses are imported; while the others have been 
purchased with much care in their selection, from the best 
breeders on the continent. 

More than two hundred head of cattle, representing all the 
leading beef, dual purpose, and dairy breeds are maintained on 
the farm. Complete breeding herds of most of the breeds are 
kept. A large herd of Galloway cows, kept for cross-breeding 
purposes, is used in the production of blue grays. An excellent 
collection of steers, representing the highest type of fat steer, 
and all the other classes and grades to be found on our leading 
markets down to the very lowest grades, is always available 
for class work. This affords our students an excellent opportun- 
ity to study the market demands and to know what constitutes 
each class, also why there is such a wide margin in the prices 
paid for cattle by the packer. 

A dairy farm of 200 acres, located near the College, has been 
purchased recently. This farm will be well stocked with dairy 
cattle. It will have a herd of a hundred or more representatives 
of the Holsteins, Jerseys, Guernseys, Ayrshires, milking Short- 
horns, and good grades, with good sires of the different breeds 
named. This equipment will afford excellent opportunities for 
class room work when studying the origin, history, and develop- 
ment of the different breeds of dairy cattle, their characteristics 
and the conditions under which they have been evolved. 

This new equipment will also afford the College excellent 
opportunities for carrying on investigation work along the lines 
of breeding, feeding and management of the dairy herd for profit; 
the adaptability of the different breeds to Iowa conditions; and 
the relative values of home-grown feed stuffs and by-products in 
the production of milk and butter fat. 

The equipment of the sheep department is especially strong, 
consisting of over two hundred head, with good representatives 
of the mutton and wool types and typical specimens of all the 



106 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

leading breeds. Eight distinct breeds, which have been care- 
fully selected to represent the type and characteristics of each 
breed both in regard to their mutton form and wool bearing 
qualities, are always available for class-room work. In addition 
to the breeding flocks we always have a choice collection of fat 
wethers which affords an excellent opportunity for the student to 
familiarize himself with the highest type of finished mutton 
sheep. 

In the swine department, representatives of six breeds are 
maintained, including the best American as well as the leading 
British varieties. As in the other departments, the aim in this 
has been to keep in touch with the modern ideas of the leading 
breeders, both in regard to breeding and the type of the animals 
in these breeds. At all seasons of the year there is more or less 
feeding of market stock being done on the farm and in connec- 
tion with the Experiment Station, so that excellent material is 
always available for instruction purposes regarding the qualities 
that add to the value of stock for the ordinary market. Having 
pure bred representatives, it is easy to inform the student in a 
practical way on the finer points of color, type, and other char- 
acteristics that relate to the pure bred classes of stock. 

To assist further in this work, the herd books of the different 
American and foreign registry associations are being constantly 
added to the library. Through these the student is not only 
enabled to inform himself in regard to pedigrees, but he is 
enabled also to study the different scales of points which the 
breeders have adopted to represent the highest types of the 
various breeds. 

Other features of the equipment are photographs, charts and 
lantern slides; these are used in the lecture room when it is not 
possible to illustrate with the living animal. It is the aim of the 
department to illustrate all lines of instruction with living repre- 
sentatives. The abundant material available from the herds 
and flocks is freely drawn upon and used extensively in all 
lectures and score card practice. By means of score cards 
prepared by the department, the students are brought in close 
contact with the animals, and through them are informed on the 
points of market merit desirable in ordinary stock; while later 
the use of the official scale of points for the different breeds in a 
similar way, makes them skillful in judging representatives of 
the different breeds. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 107 

As soon as the student is familiar with the use of the score 
card, comparative judging is introduced. In comparative judging 
from four to six animals are used, and each student is required 
to place all the animals in order of merit, and write down clearly 
and concisely on a blank folder, prepared especially for this 
work, full reasons for making his awards. This kind of work 
teaches the student to compare animals and to balance the weak 
and the strong points of each in making his final awards. As 
soon as the student demonstrates his ability to place classes 
well, herd groups and sweepstake classes are introduced during 
his Senior year's work. This kind of work is similar to the most 
difficult judging done at our leading state fairs and international 
expositions. As soon as the student shows that he possesses the 
qualifications needed to judge stock in the show ring, he is sent 
out, in answer to the many requests from the secretaries, to 
judge various classes of stock at county fairs. This in connec- 
tion with his college work, results in establishing the lessons 
learned in the class room. 

Special Courses. 

Students desiring shorter courses of study will be permitted 
to take up special courses in any line of work offered providing 
they comply with the full requirements for admission to short 
course work as outlined elsewhere in this catalog. They must 
also have credits for all necessary work preparatory to the taking 
of such courses as are demanded of the regular men in the four 
year course. 

Winter Course in Stock Judging. 

In response to a widespread demand for special short course 
instruction in the judging and feeding of animals, a two weeks' 
course has been established during the winter vacation. This 
course will begin January 1, 1906, and continue for two weeks. 
It will be devoted exclusively to score card practice, and 
judging of horses, cattle, sheep, and hogs, and lectures on 
feeding the same. 

In this work special attention will be given to the selection 
of animals best suited for feeding purposes. Good specimens of 
the highest type of fat steer and ideal representatives of all the 
various breeds will be used for class work. At the conclusion of 
the cattle work a slaughter test and block demonstration of the 



108 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

various market types of steers will be conducted under the 
supervision of John Gosling, Kansas City, Missouri. This course 
is intended especially for the man on the farm that cannot avail 
himself of the opportunity to take a complete course. 

A special course in corn judging will be given at the same 
time and the work will be so arranged that all those present 
may take both lines of work. 

To cover in part the expense of securing additional help and 
stock for demonstration a tuition fee of $3.00 will be charged for 
admission to this course, but one fee will cover the instruction 
in both grain and stock judging. 

Clay, Robinson & Co. Fellowship Prizes. 

Clay, Robinson & Co., Live Stock Commission Merchants, 
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, offer, annually, $1,000.00 in prizes 
to be awarded to the Agricultural Colleges making the best 
exhibit of live stock at the International Live Stock Exposition 
held at Chicago in December of each year. They stipulate that 
the money won by the various colleges shall be used for the 
establishment of fellowship prizes to be awarded to graduate 
students in the department of Animal Husbandry. These fellow- 
ships, amounting to $300.00 per student annually, are granted by 
the Board of Trustees upon the recommendation of the dean of 
the Division of Agriculture and the head of the department. A 
student holding a fellowship may pursue post-graduate work in 
Animal Husbandry. 

Graduate Courses. 

We are now in a position to offer post-graduate work along 
five distinct lines. Students to be eligible to take this work 
must comply with the College requirements for post-graduate 
work as stated elsewhere in this catalog. 

(a). Anima! Nutrition. We have excellent facilities for 
advanced research work along this line on account of the vast 
amount of work done on the College farm, along the lines of 
horse, cattle, sheep, and swine feeding experiments. We have 
every year a large number of animals in feeding experiments 
under our direct supervision. Students desiring special research 
work along this line may do the same under the direction of the 
head of the Department. 

(b). Animal Breeding. A special line of research work has 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 109 

been outlined for students desiring special work pertaining to 
underlying principles of animal breeding. Special experiments 
are being conducted on the farm along new and original lines. 

(c). Study of Breeds. Our large collection of pure bred 
animals representing almost every recognized breed of live stock 
on the continent affords us excellent opportunities for special 
work along these lines. We have not only typical specimens, 
but, in most instances, we have complete breeding herds, thus 
there is an excellent opportunity to study the adaptability of 
each breed to Iowa conditions. 

(d). Stock Judging. We have unusual facilities for thor- 
ough work along this line. All of the various market types of 
animals are available, also good representatives of all the pure 
breeds. Animals are carefully examined on foot, then slaugh- 
tered for a block test and the exact percentages of the various 
cuts with their values are ascertained. 

(e). Practical Management of Stock. This course will 
include an exhaustive study and investigation of the methods in 
vogue on the best managed stock farms and breeding establish- 
ments in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, and other 
countries, and is intended especially for those students who are 
preparing to manage stock farms. 

Positions Open to Men Trained Along Animal Husbandry Lines. 

The demand for competent young men, thoroughly trained 
along the lines of practical and scientific animal husbandry work, 
by far exceeds the supply. We are constantly in receipt of 
inquiries for men combining college training with practical 
experience and natural ability. There appears to be no limit 
to this demand at a compensation not exceeded in any other 
calling. Our course is so arranged that our students have an 
excellent opportunity to combine practical and scientific knowl- 
edge. A few of the many lines of work open to graduates of 
this department are: College and Experiment Station work, 
Agricultural journalism, Managers of stock farms, Salesmen 
with commission merchants, Buyers for the packing houses at 
the many stock yard centers, Salesmen of animal feed stuffs 
manufactured by the packing houses, Glucose companies, Lin- 
seed and Cotton seed oil companies, etc., etc. At the present 
time we have not nearly enough good men to fill the positions 
open to graduates. 



110 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



COURSE IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 
Academic Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

English, 5 

History, Western Europe, 5 

Elementary Speech, 2 



(Mathematics, XII.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, I.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 5 

(Mathematics, XIII and V.) 
Elementary Botany, 2 (Botany, I.) 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

History, Advanced American, 4 (History, II.) 

Gesture and Voice, 1 (Public Speaking, II.) 



Freshman ' 


/ear. 




FIRST SEMESTER. 




Live Stock and Score Card Practice 


, 2 


(Animal Husbandry, I.) 


Market and Home Gardening, 2 




(Horticulture, I.) 


German, 5, or 




(Language, V.) 


French, 5 




(Language, I.) 


Corn and Grain Judging, 5 




(Agronomy, I.) 


History, English History, 1 




(History, XVII.) 


Advanced Rhetoric, 5 




(English, III.) 


Military, 2 




(Military, I.) 


Library Work, 4 hours 







SECOND SEMESTER. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 
Plant Propagation and Small Fruits, 3 
Solid Geometry, 2* 
German, 5 or 
French, 5 
Farm Crops, 5 



(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Horticulture, II.) 

(Mathematics, VIA.) 

(Language, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 



♦Graduates of accredited schools who are deficient in algebra but have a 
grade in solid geometry; will take advanced algebra two hours in the Fresh- 
man Year in lieu of solid geometry. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



111 



Entomology, 2 (Zoology, I.) 

Composition, 1 (English, IV.) 

Military, 2 (Military, II.) 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 (History, XVIII.) 

Sophomore Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 

Farm Mechanics, 5 (Agronomy, III.) 

Vertebrate Zoology, 4 . (Zoology, II.) 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Orcharding, 3 (Horticulture, III.) 

Military, 2 (Military, III.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 
Farm Mechanics, 5 
Invertebrate Zoology, 4 



(Animal Husbandry, IV 
(Agronomy, IV. 
(Zoology, III.; 



Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 
Military, 2 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 
(English, VI.; 
(Military, IV.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Live Stock Management, 2 
Principles of Breeding, 2 
Chemistry, 4 
Farm Dairying, 2 
Embryology, 3 
Soils, 5 



(Animal Husbandry, XL) 

(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 

(Agricultural C&emistry, XXV.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Agronomy, V.) 



Elective. 



Histology. 2 

Comparative Physiology, 1 
Physiography, 3 
Surveying, 4 
Photographs, 2 



(Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 



H2 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Cryptogamic Botany, 4 

Economic Botany, 2 

Economic Entomology, 5 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

Drama, 3 

History, Europe in the 16th, 17th, 

History, The Renaissance, 2 

The Drama Translation, 2 

Debating, 1 

Advanced Interpretation, 2 

French, 5 or 

German, 5 

Military Science, 1 



(Physics, XTV.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, 1.) 

(Literature, I.) 

18th Centuries, 3 (History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Literature, VIII.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, m.) 

(Language, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(Military, VII) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Live Stock Management, 2 
Animal Parasites, 2 
Soils, 5 
Chemistry, 4 



(Animal Husbandry, XII.) 

(Zoology, VIII.) 

(Agronomy, VI.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 



Elective. 



Agricultural Economics, 5 

Plant Breeding, 3 

Forestry, 3 

Comparative Physiology, 1 

Bacteriology, 2 

Adv. Public Speech, 1 

Roads and Pavements, 2 

Plane Trigonometry, 3 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

French, 5 or 

German, 5 



(Economics, VIII.) 

(Horticulture, IV.) 

(Horticulture, XIV.) 

(Veterinary, XXII.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mathematics, VIB.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Language, IV.) 

(Language, VIII.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



113 



Debating, 1 (English, VIII.) 

History, French Revolution and the XLXth Century, 3 

(History, VI.) 
History, Constitutional History of England, 2, (History, XI.) 
Advanced Work in Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VI.) 

Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER* 

Advanced Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Animal Husbandry, VI.) 
Anatomy of Domestic Animals, 2 (Veterinary Science, LV.) 

Obstetrics, 1 (Veterinary Science, XLX.) 

Sanitary Science, 2 (Veterinary Science, XLTV.) 

Farm Management, 5 (Agronomy, VIII.) 



Elective. 



Dairy Bacteriology, 3 
Butter Making, 3 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Vegetable Pathology, 2 or 5 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Agrostology, 2 
Chemistry, 4 
Evolution of Plants, 1 
Geology, 5 
Analytic Geometry, 5 
History Political Economy, 2 
Political Economy, 3 
Psychology, 5 
.American Literature, 3 
The Short Story, 2 
Dramatic Art, 2 or 
Extempore Speech, 2 
Oration, 1 
French, 4 or 
German, 4 



(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Botany, V.) 

(Zoology, EX.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVTI.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Economic Science, m.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Literature, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, V.) 

(Public Speaking, X.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Language, III.) 

(Language, VII.) 



History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 (History, III.) 

History, Diplomatic History of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 



114 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Landscape Gardening, 2 
Military Science, 1 
Chemistry, 5 
Advanced Work in Soils, 2 



(Horticulture, VIII.) 

(Military, VII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Agronomy, VII. > 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Herd Books and Animal By-Products, 2 Animal Husbandry, VII. > 



Horse Shoeing, 2 
Conformation and Soundness, 2 
Animal Nutrition, 5 
Evolution of Animals, 1 
Thesis, 2 



(Veterinary Science, XVI.) 

(Veterinary Science, XVIII.) 

(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

(Zoology, VI.) 

(Animal Husbandry, X.) 



Elective. 



Chemistry, 4 

Dairying, 3 

Cheese Making, 3 

Technology of Milk, 1 

Rural Law, 1 

Advanced Forestry, 3 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Calculus, 5 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5 

Geology, 5 

Ethics, 3 

Novel and Romance, 3 

The Essay, 2 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Advanced Extempore Speech, 2 

History, The Welding of the Nation, 1845-1900, 3 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 

(Dairying, I.) 

(Dairying, XV.) 

(Dairying, XVI.) 

(Civics, V.) 

(Horticulture, XV.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIV.) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Botany, Vin.) 

(Botany, XI.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Psychology, II.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Literature, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, XI.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 



Astronomy, 5 (Physics, VIII.) 

Industrial Development of the United States. 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 

Advanced Work in Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

The following courses of study are given in Animal Hus- 
bandry: 

Course I. — Market Types — Cattle and Sheep. — First Sem- 



DIVISION OF AGEICULTTJRE 115 

ester. Freshman year. This course covers the judging of the 
different market classes of cattle (beef and dual purpose), and 
sheep (mutton and wool.) Judging two 2-hour periods per 
week. Prof. Rutherford, Mr. Dinsmore, Mr. Smith, and Mr. Rubel. 

Course II. — Market Types — Dairy Cattle — Horses and Swine. 

— Second Semester. Freshman year. This course covers the 
judging of the different market classes of dairy cattle; of horses 
(light and heavy) ; and swine (bacon and fat.) Judging two 
2-hour periods per week. Prof. Rutherford, Mr. Dinsmore, Mr. 
Smith, and Mr. Rubel. 

Course II!. — Breed Types — Cattle and Sheep. — First Sem- 
ester. Sophomore year. This course covers the judging of repre- 
sentative^ of the different breeds according to their official 
standards; also a study of their origin, history and character- 
istics and adaptability to different conditions of climate and 
soil. Lectures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 2-hour 
periods per week. Professor Rutherford, and Mr. Dinsmore. 

Course IV. — Breed Types — Dairy Cattle — Horses and Swine. 
— Second Semester. Sopohomore year. This course covers the 
judging of representatives of the different breeds according to 
their official standards; also a study of their origin, history and 
characteristics, and adaptability to different conditions of climate 
and soil. Lectures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 
2-hour periods per week. Only students who have a credit in 
Course I., or a credit showing that they have covered the same 
work in some other agricultural college, are eligible to Courses 
III and IV. Professor Rutherford, and Mr. Dinsmore. 

Course VI. — Advanced Livestock Judging. — First Semester, 
Senior year. This course covers horses, cattle, sheep and swine. 
Special attention is paid to the judging of groups of animals, 
similar to county and state fair work. Judging two 2-hour per- 
iods per week. Only special or regularly enrolled students in 
Animal Husbandry who have credits in Courses I., II., III., and 
IV. are elegible to Animal Husbandry VI. Professors Kennedy 
and Rutherford. 

Course VII. — Animal By-Products and Herd Book Study. — 
Second Semester. Senior year. The first sixteen weeks are 
devoted to the study of herd books, with a view to becoming 
acquainted with the pedigrees and the leading strains and 
families of the different breeds of livestock. The remaining four 



116 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

weeks will be given to the study of the animal by-products of 
the packing houses. Two 1-hour periods per week. Students 
must have credit in Course VIII. in order to classify in Course 

VII. Professor Rutherford. 

Course VIII. — Principles of Breeding. — First Semester, 
Junior year. This course embraces a study of the principles of 
breeding, including selection, heredity, atavism, variation, fecun- 
dity, with the presentation of the methods of breeding, in-and-in 
breeding, cross breeding, etc., and a historical study of their 
results. In addition, the several features relating to the higher 
breeding of pure bred stock are made the subject of study and 
investigation. Two 1-hour periods per week. Students must 
have credits in Courses III. and IV. in order to classify in Course 

VIII. Professors Kennedy and Rutherford. 

Course IX. — Animal Nutrition. — Second Semester. Senior 
year. This course includes anatomy and physiology of the 
digestive system, the purpose of nutrition, the theory and prac- 
tical economy of rations for growth, fattening, milk or mainte- 
nance; sanitation of feeds, and hygiene of the farm. Five 1-hour 
periods per week. Students must have Agricultural Chemistry, 
Courses 21, 23, 25 and 26, and 72 hours Comparative Physiology, 
80 hours Organic Chemistry, and 50 hours Physiologic Chemistry. 
Professor Kennedy and Mr. Smith. 

Course X. — Thesis and Investigation Work. — Senior year. 
Upon lines to be arranged with the head of the department, 
according to the nature of the subject. Professors Kennedy and 
Rutherford. 

Course XI. — Livestock Management. — First Semester. Junior 
year. The housing, feeding, care and management of beef and 
dairy cattle. One-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory per 
week. Mr. Dinsfore. 

Course XII. — Livestock Management. — Second Semester. 
Junior year. The housing, feeding, care and management of 
horses, hogs, and sheep. Mr. Dins more. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 117 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE AND FORESTRY. 

S. A. BEACH, PROFESSOR. 

A. T. ERWIN, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

H. P. BAKER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

M. L. MERRITT, INSTRUCTOR. 

The Department of Horticulture has offices, classroom and 
library on the second floor of Agricultural Hall, a laboratory- 
building 35 x 50 feet, two stories high with a nine foot basement, 
and greenhouses of the modern construction, containing over 
5,000 square feet under glass. 

The main floor of the laboratory is divided into two rooms 
and will accommodate fifty students. One of the rooms is espe- 
cially fitted for the study of fruits, and opening from it are two 
refrigerators for the storing of specimens. The second floor 
contains photographic and dark rooms for the department, and 
the horticultural museum equipped with a full collection of 
horticultural implements and machinery. The museum also 
contains a large collection of fruit models and horticultural 
herbarium that is accessible to advanced students. 

The greenhouses give every opportunity for the student to 
become familiar with the management of plants under glass, and 
the collection has been made with a view of representing species 
of the greatest educational value. 

The department has a large library which is kept in the 
offices in Agricultural Hall and in addition to the complete files 
of horticuleural publications of the country, possesses the private 
library of Charles Downing, the author of "Fruits and Fruit Trees 
of America," which contains many rare horticultural works, as 
well as his original notes and manuscript. 

The land devoted to horticultural purposes comprises about 
forty acres. In this area are orchards of varying ages, from 
fifteen years down to those set within the last two years. The 
varieties of fruits on trial, number more than one thousand and 
include the hardiest types of native and foreign kinds. The 
student is thus afforded unusual facilities for observation and 
study. Adjacent to the orchards and small fruit plantations, are 
the nursery grounds where the operations of the nurseryman 
in the various methods of stratification, budding and grafting are 
illustrated in a practical manner. A considerable area is devoted 
each year to the growing of vegetables, and variety tests of the 
leading types are made in connection with the Experiment 



118 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Station work, thus affording ample opportunity for field study- 
in the methods of culture practiced by the amateur and market 
gardener. 

Within the past six years there has been a wonderful 
development throughout the country in the science of Forestry. 
Private lumber firms, railroads, and the United States govern- 
ment are constantly calling for young men trained in Forestry 
to carry on lumbering operations in a way that will insure future 
supplies, to study the question of the production of timber for 
ties, poles and posts, the preservation of timber, and for the 
more scientific work of the government in studying the general 
forest conditions of the country. To fill these various demands, 
a few colleges and universities, including this one, have estab- 
lished courses of instruction which will prepare young men for 
the above mentioned positions. 

Iowa is largely a prairie state, yet there are excellent oppor- 
tunities at this College for the study of planted groves, and 
of the native timber growing along near-by rivers and streams. 
It is the question of the formation and care of the farm wood 
lot which will produce on short rotations, the necessary fuel 
and posts for the farm that will be of prime importance in the 
development of forestry in the state, hence, a great deal of 
attention will be paid to the problems connected with farm 
forestry. 

On the College grounds there are some ten acres of forest 
plantations in which there are to be found a large number of 
deciduous and evergreen trees which are known to be well 
adapted for planting in this and the surrounding prairie states. 
Several acres have been set apart for the establishment of exhi- 
bition plots of trees adapted to Iowa conditions. Portions of these 
plots will be planted in the spring of 1905. There are excellent 
examples of windbreaks and shelterbelt planting, both of native 
and foreign trees upon or near the campus which afford splendid 
opportunity for the study of the comparative value of the native 
and foreign kinds. 

A collection of specimens of several hundred different 
species of woods, native to this country and tropical America, 
are available for study in the museum of the department and 
these are used for illustrating the lectures upon timber, its uses 
and identification. This collection has recently been enlarged 
by donations from the Philippine Islands and other possessions. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 119 

The library has recently added a large number of the best 
books on Forestry both from this country and abroad, and 
on the reading table of the department are to be found all of 
the best magazines and papers bearing upon the subjects of 
Forestry, Lumbering, and Game. 

The graduate who completes this course will find himself 
well equipped in the technique and applied principles of Horti- 
culture and Forestry. Graduates who desire to pursue post- 
graduate work, will find themselves well prepared to do so, 
either at this or other institutions of like character. 

Particular stress is laid upon laboratory instruction and the 
facilities and equipment are exceptionally good for this phase 
of the work. 

Text books are used as a basis for the work in most of the 
courses, supplemented by lectures. 

COURSES IN HORTICULTURE. 
Academic Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, XII.) 

English, 5 (English, I.) 

History, Western Europe, 5 (History, I.) 

Elementary Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, I.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Advanced Algebra and Plane Geometry, 5 

(Mathematics XIII. and V.) 

Elementary Botany, 2 (Botany, I.) 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

History, Advanced American, 4 (History, II.) 

Gesture and Voice, 1 (Public Speaking, n.) 
Freshman Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 (Animal Husbandry, I.) 

Home and Market gardening, 2 (Horticulture, I.) 

German, 5 or (Langauge, V.) 

French 5, (Language, I.) 

Corn and Grain Judging, 5 (Agronomy, I.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 (English, III.) 

History, English, 1 (History, XVII.) 

Military, 2 (Military, II.) 
Library Work, 4 hours. 



120 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND SEMESTEE. 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 

Plant Propagation, 3 

Solid Geometry, 2* 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Field Crops, 5 

Entomology, 2 

Composition, 1 

Military, 2 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 



Animal Husbandry, II. > 

(Horticulture, II.) 

(Mathematics, VI. a.> 

(Language, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(Agronomy, II.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Military, II.) 

(History, XVIII. > 



Sophomore Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Orcharding, 3 
Farm Crops, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
Meteorology, 3 
Farm Dairying, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Horticulture, III.) 

(Agronomy, III.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 



Histology, 4 (Botany, III.) 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5, or (Botany, XII.) 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 (Botany, XV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

Forestry, 3 (Horticulture, XIV.) 

Composition, 1 (English, VI.) 

Military, 2 (Military, IV.) 
Junior Year. 



Pomology, 2 
Economic Entomology, 
Chemistry, 4 
Soils, 5 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

(Horticulture, V.) 

5 (Zoology, IV.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 

(Agronomy, V.) 



♦Graduates of accredited schools who are deficient in algebra, but have a 
grade in solid geometry, will take advanced algebra two hours in the Fresh- 
man Year in lieu of solid geometry. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



121 



Elective. 



Histology, 2 

Physiology, 1 

Analytical Geometry, 5 

Photography, 2 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Cryptogamic Botany, 4 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 5 

Drama, 3 

The Drama in Translation, 2 

Debating, 1 

Advanced Interpretation, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Military Science, 1 

Europe in the 16th, 17th and 

The Renaissance, 2 



(Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Literature, VEIL) 

(English, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(Language, VII.) 

(Language, III.) 

(Military, VI.) 

18th Centuries, 3 (History, V.) 

(History, X.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Forestry, 3 
Bacteriology, 2 
Plant Breeding, 3 
Greenhouse Management, 3 
Soils, 5 



(Horticulture, XV.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Horticulture, IV.) 

(Horticulture, VII.) 

(Agronomy, VI.) 



Elective. 



Comparative Physiology, 1 

Chemistry, 4 

Improvement of Farm Crops, 2 

Advanced Public Speech, 1 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 or 5 

Histology, 4 

Mineralogy, 4 

Plane Trigonometry, 3 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

French, 5, or 



(Veterinary Science, XXII.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 

(Agronomy, XI.) 

(Public Speaking, VIII.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Mathematics, VLB.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Language, IV.) 



122 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



German, 5 (Language, VIII.) 

Debating, 1 (English, VIII.) 

Rural Architecture, 4 (Agronomy, XIII.) 
History, French Revolution and XlXth Century, 3 (History, VI.) 

History, Constitutional History of England, 2 (History, XL) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VI.) 

Soils, 2 Agronomy, VII.) 

Botany, Economic, 2 (Botany, X) 

Agricultural Economics, 5 (Economics VEIL) 

Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Landscape Gardening, 2 
Research Work, 2 
Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 
Vegetable Pathology, 3 to 5 



(Horticulture, VIII.) 

(Horticulture, IX.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Botany, V.) 



Elective. 



Dairy Bacteriology, 3 
Buttermaking, 3 
Comparative Physiology, 2 
Farm Management, 5 
Agrostology, 2 
Geology, 5 

Analytic Geometry, 5 
Political Economy, 3 
History of Political Economy, 2 
Psychology, 5 
American Literature, 3 
The Short Story, 2 
Evolution of Plants, 
Advanced Crypt. Botany, 3 
Dramatic Art, 2, or 
Extempore Speech, 2 
Oration, 1 
Chemistry, 5 
Military Science, 1 



(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Agronomy, VIII.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Literature, D7.) 

(Literature, VI.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, V.) 

(Public Speaking, X.) 

(Elocution, IX.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Military, VII.) 

III.) 



History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 (History 

History, Diplomatic History of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 
Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VTI.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 123 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Literature of Horticulture, 2 (Horticulture, X.) 

Vegetable Physiology, 2 (Botany, XI.) 

Forestry, 3 (Horticulture, XVI.) 

Thesis, 2 (Horticulture, XIII.) 

Elective. 

Animal Nutrition, 5 (Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

Comparative Physiology, 2 (Veterinary, XXIV.) 

Technology of Milk, 1 (Dairying, XVI.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX.) 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 (Botany, VIII.) 

Ethics, 3 (Psychology, II.) 

Novel and Romance, 3 (Literature, III.) 

The Essay, 2 (Literature, VII.) 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 (Public Speaking, VI.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Advanced Extempore Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, XI.) 
Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

Rural Law, 1 (Civics, V.) 

Soils, 2 (Agronomy, VII.) 
History, The Welding of the Nation, 1845-1900, 3 (History, IV.) 

History, The Far Eastern Question, 2 (History, IX.) 

COURSES IN HORTICULTURE. 

FIRST SEMESTER STUDIES. 

Course I. — Home and Market Gardening. — This course is a 
study of the small fruits and vegetables. It takes up the prin- 
ciples of culture, methods of harvesting and marketing, and the 
practical details of home and market gardening. Two recitations 
per week. Required of all Agricultural students in the First 
Semetser of the Freshman year. Mr. Merritt. 

Course III. — Orcharding. — Under this subject is studied the 
principles and practices of orcharding. The establishment and 
maintenance of home orchards and commercial plantations, is 
considered. The work is designed primarily for the Agricultural 
student who expects to engage in general farming hence a large 



124 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

portion of the time is devoted to the home, orchard and its 
problems. In the laboratory, the leading types of orchard fruits 
are studied. Each student is furnished fresh specimens of the 
important varieties for description and score card work. This 
is followed by a discussion regarding its adaptability to the 
various sections of the state, its season, hardiness and other 
characteristics. Two recitations and one laboratory. Required 
of all Agricultural students in the First Semester of the Sopho* 
more year. Professor Erwin and Mr. Merritt. 

Course V. — Pomology. — This is a course in systematic Pomo- 
logy and is devoted to the study of orchard fruits, their origin, 
history and synonyms. Special attention is given to the impor- 
tant commercial types. Course III. is a pre-requisite to this 
work. Required of Horticultural students in the First Semester 
of the Junior year. One laboratory and one recitation per week. 
Professor Beach. 

Course VIII. — Landscape Gardening. — This course embraces 
the principles of Landscape Gardening, the planting and decora- 
tion of home grounds, parks, etc. A systematic study is also 
made of the materials most suitable for planting in Iowa. On 
the College campus and in the Horticultural Department grounds, 
is to be found a large collection of ornamental trees and shrubs 
which afford excellent laboratory material for this work. First 
Semester of the Senior year. Required in the Horticultural 
course, and elective to other Agricultural students. Two hours 
per week. Professor Erwin. 

Course IX. — Research. — This course affords an opportunity 
for students to carry on a special line of investigation which is 
mapped out and carried on independently by the student under 
the supervision of the head of the department. Required of 
Horticultural students in the First Semester of the Senior year. 
Two hours per week. Professor Beach. 

Course XI. — Amateur Floriculture. — This course embraces 
a study of the propagation and general management of house 
plants, outdoor flower beds and ornamental shrubs. A systematic 
study of annuals, herbaceous perennials, bulbs, climbers, and 
house plants is also included in the course. This course requires 
no pre-requisite work in Horticulture and is an elective in the 
General and Domestic Science and required in Domestic Science 
in the First Semester of the Junior year. Two hours per week. 
Professor Erwin. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 125 



SECOND SEMESTER STUDIES. 



Course II. — Plant Propagation. — The course embraces a 
study of the principles of plant growth as affected by moisture, 
temperature, and food supply. Propagation of plants by seedage, 
cuttage, layerage, and graftage is studied. Laboratory work is 
given in the various methods of propagation, both in greenhouse 
and nursery. Required of all Agricultural students in the 
Second Semester of the Freshman year. Two recitations and 
one laboratory period per week. Professor Erwin and Mr. 
Merritt. 

Course IV. — Plant Breeding. — Perhaps no subject in the 
field of Agriculture is attracting more attention today than that 
of plant improvement. Plant Breeding is governed by certain 
fundamental principles. In this course, study is first made of 
the underlying principles governing the amelioration and breed- 
ing of plants and second, the direct application of these prin- 
ciples to the field of Horticulture. The methods of Knight, 
Van Mons, Mendel and other prominent plant breeders are 
studied. A systematic survey is also made of what has already 
been accomplished in this work in the field of Horticulture. 
Required of Horticultural students in the Second Semester of 
the Junior year, and elective for other students in Agriculture. 
Three hours per week. Professor Beach. 

Course VII. — Greenhouse Management. — A study of the 
construction and heating of greenhouses, a systematic study of 
the more important greenhouse plants and methods of culture; 
also the forcing of vegetables in both greenhouses and hot beds. 
Laboratory work embraces the practical details of propagation 
and care of plants in greenhouses. Required of Horticultural 
students in the Second Semester of the Junior year. Two recita- 
tions and one laboratory per week. Mr. Merritt. 

Course X. — Literature of Horticulture. — This course is de- 
signed to familiarize the student with the ancient and modern 
workers in the field of Horticulture. It embraces the study of 
the lives and accomplishments of the past workers in the field 
of American Horticulture and also the leading ones of the old 
world. Required of Horticultural students and elective to others. 
Second Semester. Senior year. Two hours per week. Professor 
Erwin. 

Course XIII. — Thesis. — A subject shall be chosen under the 



126 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

direction of the head of the department, which requires original 
work of investigation. After the subject has been thoroughly 
studied, a complete write up of the results is made. All 
required courses in Horticulture except those given in the 
Second Semester Senior are pre-requisites of this course. A 
subject for investigation may be chosen for Course IX and 
the work continued in Course XIII. Required of Horticultural 
students in the Second Semester of the Senior year. Two hours 
per week. Professor Beach. 

COURSES IN FORESTRY. 

Course XIV. — Elementary Forestry. — In this course short 
studies are made of the life history of a tree, influences of 
forests upon climate and the erosive action of streams, distri- 
bution of trees in the United States, and tree planting in Iowa, 
with special attention given to the formation, growth, and care 
of windbreaks and farm woodlots. The structure and uses of 
our common timber and methods of artificial preservation are 
dealt with briefly. Text book, Elementary Forestry, by Greene. 
This course is required of all students in Horticulture and 
Agronomy. Three hours per week, second Semester, Sophomore. 
Professor Baker. 

Course XV. — Silviculture. — During the Second Semester of 
the Junior year, the work begun in Course XIV. will be con- 
tinued. Special attention will be given to the distribution and 
character of our native forests, factors of tree growth and 
various phases of tree planting, such as collection and storage 
of seed, choice of species to plant, and methods of planting in 
reference to Iowa conditions, the protection of growing timber 
from the usual enemies of trees. The study of forest measure- 
ments will be given some attention, especially methods of deter- 
mination of contents of single trees and forests as a whole, with 
the rate of growth of trees, etc. Field work will be given in 
connection with the lectures in which summer and winter char- 
acters of the trees will be studied. Required of all Horticulture 
students and elective to others. Three hours per week. Professor 
Baker. 

Course XVI. — Forest Management and Policy. — This work 
will cover the various phases of forest management, such as 
the different methods of reproduction, thinning, and final cutting 



DIVISION OP AGRICTJLTTJBE 127 

of the forest, valuation of forest crops, and practical studies of 
the Iowa farm woodlot. Methods of identification of our common 
commercial timbers with their principal uses will also be taken 
up. Under the head of forest policy, brief studies will be made 
of the attitudes of nations toward forests, ownership of forests, 
relation of forests to water supply, and history of forestry in the 
United States, with notes upon the Government Bureau of 
Forestry and its work. Required of all Horticulture students 
and elective for others who have completed Courses XIV. and 
XV. Thre hours per week. Second Semester, Senior year. Profes- 
sor Baker. 

Course XVII. — Wood Technology. — This course will be an 
elective for students in the Civil and Mechanical Engineering 
and other departments, and will be a study of the common 
timbers found upon the market. The work will consist of the 
studies of the gross structure of woods and methods of identifi- 
cation of timber which the student can use outside of the labor- 
atory; also the uses of common timbers and minor forest 
products, and the decay of timber with methods of preservation. 
Two hours of field work will be given in which the summer and 
winter characteristics of the common trees will be studied. 
Three hours per week during Second Semester, Senior year. 
Professor Baker. 

GRADUATE WORK. 

The department of Horticulture and Forestry offers graduate 
work along the following lines. 

Horticulture. 

(a.) Pomology. — The orchards of the department, which 
contain over two hundred and fifty varieties of apples, one 
hundred and fifty varieties of plums, and fifty varieties of 
cherries, furnish abundant material for the specialist who desires 
to make a comparative study of varieties. In addition to this, 
the department possesses the private library of Charles Downing 
and his unpublished manuscript notes and descriptions; also 
several hundred catalogue descriptions of fruit that have been 
made in the last few years in the department. 

(b) Plant Breeding. — For many years systematic plant 
breeding has been carried on by the department. The results 
of this work can be seen in all stages from the young plants 



128 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

just starting to grow to those that have been fruiting or flower- 
ing for many years. The department each year carries on 
extensive work in plant breeding in connection with the 
State Horticultural Society which offers exceptional opportunity 
for study and field experience by tne specialist. The department 
is equipped with incubators, microscopes and other apparatus 
for laboratory investigations. 

Forestry. 

The last census returns show that Iowa has less than 12% 
of wooded area. This condition explains why we are so essen- 
tially a prairie state and as such, there are very many new and 
unsolved problems in tree planting and the reproduction and 
care of the areas of native timber. Examples of what are typical 
conditions throughout the State are found on or near the cam- 
pus, hence we feel that there is splendid opportunity for research 
and graduate work along the lines outlined below. The depart- 
ment has in its museum, several hundred different kinds of 
native and foreign woods and this collection has recently been 
greatly enlarged by specimens from the Philippine Islands and 
surrounding states of this country. An herbarium of forestry 
specimens is being built up which will aid the student much in 
identification of our native trees. 

(a.) Problem of Tree Planting. — Some ten acres of planted 
groves on the campus, of both deciduous and broad leaved 
specimens, and numerous groves and windbreaks in the imme- 
diate region, present excellent opportunities for studies in the 
adaption of a large number of native and introduced species 
to our various soil and climatic conditions. Also, methods of 
collection, storage, and germination of the seed of these trees 
with the treatment of the seedlings in the nursery, the rate of 
growth as seedlings and as mature trees. There is a wide field 
for the study of the formation and care of windbrakes and 
farm woodlots, their value for the production of fuel, posts and 
lumber and the influence of their protection on orchards, or- 
dinary field crops and ornamental tress and shrubs. 

(b.) Studies of the Native Timber Growth. — The scattered 
and open growth of native timber along Squaw Creek and 
Skunk River provides for numerous lines of interesting study 
such as the problem of the reproduction and care of these areas 
of native timber and the determination of their value to farmers 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 129 

and stockmen for protection against erosion, severe winds, and 
for commercial purposes such as the production of fuel, posts 
and lumber. There is need of a more complete study of methods 
of protection of both native and planted timber against over- 
grazing and trampling by stock as well as from fires, and 
insects and fungi which usually follow the fires. 

(c.) Prevention of Erosion and Reclamation of Flood Dam- 
aged Lands by Tree Planting. — This line of investigation will 
cover a thorough study of various trees that are best adapted 
for the holding of stream banks against the erosive action of 
floods, and high water. Methods of planting and the care of 
these trees and practical studies of various methods of reclama- 
tion by planting, of lands whose value has been destroyed by 
high waters and floods. 

(d.) Studies in the Artificial Preservation of Timber. — 
Within the year, a series of experiments has been undertaken 
in co-operation with the United States Bureau of Forestry in 
the investigation of several methods of the artificial preservation 
of various soft-wooded fence posts such as willow, cottonwood, 
soft maple and box elder. The first work in these experiments 
will be the use of a shallow open tank for the impregnation of 
these fence posts with tar oil and as the work will be under way 
for a year, there will be opportunity for original investigation 
along these lines. 

SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE. 

The field of Agriculture is undergoing such rapid changes 
and there is such wide and varied demand for men combining 
agricultural and scientific training that it has been deemed 
advisable to add a course rather less technical than the four 
preceding courses that relate directly to these special lines of 
agriculture. This course is designed to meet the demands of 
country agricultural high schools and other institutions, public 
and private, established for the purpose of giving instruction in 
the general sciences, and elementary instruction in agriculture. 
The introduction of agriculture into the rural schools has re- 
ceived a marked impetus during the past few years. There will 
doubtless arise a large demand for strong, broadly educated, well 
trained teachers for this and other kinds of agricultural instruc- 
tion in public and preparatory schools. 



130 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



COURSE IN SCIENCE AND AGRICULTURE. 
Academic Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

English, 5 

History, Western Europe, 

Elementary Speech, 2 



(Mathematics, XII.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, I.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra and Plane 

Elementary Botany, 2 
Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
History, Advanced American, 4 
Gesture and Voice, 1 



Geometry, 5 

(Mathematics, XIII and V.) 

(Botany, I.) 

(English, II.) 

(.History, II.) 

( Public Speaking, II. ) 



Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 (Animal Husbandry, I.) 



Home and Market Gardening, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

History, English History, 1 

Military, 2 

Library Work, 4 hours. 



(Horticulture, 1.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Language, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Military, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 

Plant Propagation, 3 

Solid Geometry, and Trigonometry, 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

Composition, 1 

Entomology, 2 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 

Military, 2 



2 (Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Horticulture, II.) 

5 (Mathematics, VI.) 

(Language, VI.) 

(Language, II.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(History, XVIII.) 

(Military, II.) 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



131 



Sophomore Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Orcharding, 3 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
Chemistry, 5 
Meteorology, 3 
Farm Dairying, 2 
Farm Mechanics, 5 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Horticulture, III.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXI.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(Dairying, XII.) 

(Agronomy, III.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Histology, 4 
Systematic Botany, 3 to 
Forestry, 3 
Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 1 
Military, 2 



(Botany, III.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Horticulture, VI.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXIII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military, IV.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Chemistry, 4 
Soils, 5 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXV.) 
(Agronomy, V.) 



Elective. 



Principles of Breeding, 2 


(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 


Advanced Pomology, 2 


(Horticulture, V.) 


Economic Entomology, 5 


(Zoology, IV.) 


Vertebrate Zoology, 4 or 5 


(Zoology, II.) 


Live Stock Management, 2 


(Animal Husbandry, XI.) 


Histology, 2 


(Veterinary Science, XXXII.) 


Physiology, 1 


(Veterinary Science, XXI.) 


Shop Work, 1 


(Mechanical Engineering, XXXVIII.) 


Analytical Geometry, 5 


(Mathematics, VILT.) 


Surveying, 4 


(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 


Photography, 2 


(Physics, IX.) 


Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 


(Physics, XIV.) 


Cryptogamic Botany, 4 


(Botany, IV.) 


Geology, 5 


(Geology, II.) 



132 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Political Economy, 5 

Drama, 3 » 

The Drama in Translation, 

Debating, 1 

Advanced Interpretation, 2 

German, 5, or 

French, 5 

History, The 16th, 17th and 

History, The Renaissance, 2 

Military Science, 1 



18th Centuries, 3 



(Economic Science, I.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Literature, VIII.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(Language, VII.) 

(Language, III.) 

(History, V.) 

(History, X.) 

(Military, VI.) 



SECOND SEMESTEE. 



Forestry, 3 
Bacteriology, 2 

Soils, 5 



(Horticulture, VI.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Agronomy, VI.) 



Elective. 



(Botany, X.) 
(Botany, XII.) 
(Zoology, III.) 
(Animal Husbandry, XII.) 
(Zoology, V.) 
(Horticulture, VII.) 
(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVI.) 
(Veterinary Science, XXII.) 
(Public Speaking, VIII.) 
(Civil Engineering, XIII.) 
(Mathematics, IX.) 
(Agronomy, IV.) 
(Botany, XV.) 
(Geology, VI.) 
(Economic Science, V.) 
(Economic Science, V.) 
(Literature, II.) 
(Public Speaking, IV.) 
(Language, IV.) 
(Language, VEIL) 
(English, VIII.) 
History, The French Revolution and to XlXth Century, 3 

(History, VI.) 
History, The Constitutional History of England, 2 (History, XI.) 



Economic Botany, 2 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 to 5 

Invertebrate Zoology, 4 or 5 

Live Stock Management, 2 

Embryology, 3 to 5 

Greenhouse Management, 4 

Chemistry, 4 

Physiology, 1 

Advanced Public Speech, 1 

Roads and Pavements, 2 

Calculus, 5 

Farm Mechanics, 5 

Systematic Botany, 3 to 5 

Mineralogy, 4 

Finance, 3 

Money and Banking, 2 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Debating, 1 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



133 



Military Science, 1 
Agricultural Economics, 5 



Senior Year. 



(Military, VI.) 
(Economics, VIII.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Landscape Gardening, 2 
Vegetable Pathology, 3 to 5 



(Horticulture, VIII.) 
(Botany, V.) 



Elective. 



Advanced Entomology, 3 or 5 

Research Work, 2 

Chemistry, 4 

Dairy Bacteriology, 3 

Butter Making, 3 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Farm Management, 5 

Agrostology, 2 

Geology, 5 

Political Economy, 3 

History of Poltical Economy, 2 

Psychology, 5 

American Literature, 3 

The Short Story, 2 

Dramatic Art, 2, or 

Extempore Speech, 2 

Oration, 1 

Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 

History, National Expansion 

History, Diplomatic History 



Evolution of Plants, 
Military Science, 1 



(Zoology, IX.) 

(Horticulture, IX.) 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XXVII.) 

(Dairying, XVII.) 

(Dairying, XIV.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXIII.) 

(Agronomy, VIII.) 

(Botany, XVII.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Psychology, III.) 

(Literature, D7.) 

(Literature, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, V.) 

(Public Speaking, X.) 

(Public Speaking, IX.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

1783-1845, 3 (History, III.) 

of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 
(Botany, XIX.) 
(Military, VII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 2 
Vegetable Physiology, 2 
Thesis, 2. 

Elective. 



(Horticulture, XII.) 
(Botany, XI.) 



Chemistry, 4 
Evolution of Animals, 1 



(Agricultural Chemistry, XXXIV.) 
(Zoology, VI.) 



134 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Animal Nutrition, 5 (Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

Dairying, 3 (Dairying, I.) 

Cheese Making, 3 (Dairying, XV.) 

Comparative Physiology, 2 (Veterinary, XXIV.) 

Technology of Milk, 1 (Dairying, XVI.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Ethics, 3 Psychology, II.) 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX.) 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 (Botany, VIII.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Novel and Romance, 3 (Literature, VII.) 

The Short Story, 2 (Literature, VI.) 

The Essay, 2 (Literature, VII.) 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 (Public Speaking, VI.) 

Advanced Extempore Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, XI.) 

History, The Far Eastern Question 2 (History, IV.) 
History, The Welding of the Nation, 1845-1900, 3 (History, IX.) 

Astronomy, 5 (Physics, VIII.) 
Industrial Development of the United States. 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VIII.) 

Rural Law, 1 (Civics, V.) 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

A. A. BENNETT, PROFESSOR. 
W. F. COOVER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

The aim of the work in Agricultural Chemistry is twofold; 
namely, to give the student a fundamental knowledge of chem- 
istry, and then to apply this knowledge to the chemical problems 
of agriculture. 

A sufficient amount of time during the first year and a half of 
study is applied to the acquiring of chemical principles and 
relations, yet at the same time the application of these facts is 
considered and constitutes a portion of the work. In other words 
the study of the science of chemistry accompanies its application 
to agricultural questions. The later work of the courses is 
principally devoted to applied chemistry. 

The courses of study open to the undergraduate student are 
briefly described as follows: 

Course XXI. — Elementary Experimental Chemistry. — This is 
the introductory work for the students in the agricultural courses 



DIVISION OF AGEICULTUKE 135 

and is intended to give knowledge of matter by actual handling 
and experience with it. The recitations are upon the labortary 
work for the purpose of obtaining a first-hand knowledge of 
chemical changes. The student learns how, and the necessity 
for taking notes of useful data, how to interpret these facts and 
apply them to common chemical changes that are going on in 
nature. The course includes a study of the so-called non-metallic 
elements that are present in the air and soils, etc. There are 
three recitations and two afternoons of laboratory practice per 
week. First Semester, Sophomore year. 

Course XXIII. — This course is a continuation of Course XXI, 
dealing with the metallic elements and their relation to those 
studied in the preceding Semester. In this course the student 
becomes acquainted with the basic elements in the soil and their 
relation to non-metallic compounds, i. e., the acids and their 
place in the formation of salts. He learns how to separate and 
recognize these elements, their compounds, preparatory to deter- 
mining them quantitatively. Three recitations and two after- 
noons of laboratory work are required each week. Second Sem- 
ester, Sophomore year. 

Course XXV. — Organic Chemistry. — This course follows 
regularly Courses XXI. and XXni. and deals with substances 
produced by animal and plant life. The laboratory study brings 
the student in touch with the properties and methods of prepar- 
ing organic food material. The sugars, starches and proteids, 
the simpler food material will be studied and at the same time 
the fundamentals of organic chemistry will be required. The 
work is divided into two recitations and two laboratory periods 
per week, during the First Semester, Junior year. 

Course XXVI.— Chemistry Applied to Agriculture.— This 
work will be introduced in the laboratory study by quantitative 
analysis of inorganic substances followed by analyses of soils, 
fertilizers and other inorganic substances related to agricultural 
processes. The recitation work, two hours per week, will follow 
the laboratory practice and be accompanied by text book and 
lecture study. 

Course XXVII.— Chemistry Applied to Agriculture.— This 
course will consider in an elementary manner the organic phase 
of Agricultural Chemistry and will deal with the chemical 
changes in foods during digestion and assimilation, and the 
changes that occur in the plant and animal body. Some time 



136 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

will be devoted to dairy products and especially to the methods 
of analyzing such substances for adulteration. Laboratory prac- 
tice will occupy two afternoons per week. 

Course XXVIII. — Dairy Chemistry. — Lectures and labora- 
tory practice. This course is for students in the one year course 
in dairying, and will be arranged to fit the needs and the prep- 
aration of such students, but it will be an elementary character 
throughout. First Semester. 

Course XXIX. — Continuation of Course XXVIII. Second 
Semester. 

Course XXXIV. — This is a continuation of Course XXVII. 
It is expected that the student electing this work will take up 
some special line of investigation as a result of the work done 
in the courses that have preceded it. The requisite courses are 
XXI, XXIII, XXV, XXVI, XXVII. For example, the student may 
desire to investigate somewhat fully the kind and character of 
organic matter in fertile soils; the effect of the composition of 
food on the composition of milk, as a whole or as to any of its 
constituents; changes in the composition of cheese during ripen- 
ing, etc. This course is intended to take the student into the 
subject as far as can be profitably done by the undergraduate. 

The time devoted to the subject is not less than three hours 
nor more than five hours per week in the second semester of the 
senior year. The work is largely done in the laboratory but is 
supplemented by consulting authorities and conferences with 
the instructor. 

Graduate Work in Agricultural Chemistry. 

Advanced work in agricultural chemistry leading to the 
master's degree in scientific agriculture may be selected either 
as a major or minor study. This work may be taken in the 
chemical department as a continuation of the work begun as an 
undergraduate of this college or any other college of equal rank. 
Or the student may elect to do this work with the chemical 
section of the experiment station thus coming in touch with the 
research work and investigations being carried on there. The 
following courses of graduate work are offered: 

Course I. — Chemistry of Soils. — -This course embraces a study 
in soil chemistry and its relation to plant life, including the 
chemical composition, its relation to fertility, the determination 
of available plant food, fertilizers and other substances which 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 137 

are effective in the production of crops, also the study of rain 
and drainage waters, the loss of plant food due to improper 
drainage and other conditions. 

Course II. — Chemistry of Dairying. — This work will cover a 
general survey of the field of chemistry applied to dairy problems 
such as the composition and chemical changes of butter, milk 
and cheese, and also other oils and fats used as food products 
and for adulteration. 

Course III. — Chemistry of Feeds. — This course includes a 
careful study of the chemistry of plants and field crops, such as 
the chemical composition of corn, wheat and oats, methods of 
modifying and improving the chemical composition by selection 
and plant breeding, chemical study of growing plants during the 
various stages of development, etc., the effects of various ele- 
ments in the soil on the composition and quality and the yield 
or productiveness of the grain and forage crops. The study of 
the chemical composition and nutriments of the various refuse 
and by-products used for stock feeding. 

Course IV. — Chemistry of Horticulture. — This course includes 
a careful study of the chemical composition of fruits including 
the influence of various elements present in the soil on the 
composition, quality and productiveness of the orchard, vineyard 
or garden; also the influence of climatic conditions upon the 
composition and quality of fruits, and the influence of selection 

and breeding. 

Courses in Botany. 

L. H. PAMMEL, PROFESSOR; R. E. BUCHANAN AND E. D. VOGEL, ASSIST- 
ANTS. 

Many of the contagious diseases of animals depend upon a 
knowledge of bacteriology. A knowledge of the products of the 
farm, such as grasses, clovers, and potato, from a botanical 
standpoint is important. It is not necessary here to enumerate 
the various lines of botany and its relation to agriculture, suffice 
it to say that the subject is so important that botany occupies a 
very prominent place. The department is well equipped to carry 
on the various phases of the work. The courses in botany are 
grouped under the following heads: 

Course I. — Elementary Botany. — This embraces a study of the 
morphology of flowering plants. The work covered is essentially 
found in Leavitt's Lessons or Bergen's Botany. Credit will not 



138 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

be given in this work in the college unless there is evidence of 
having pursued laboratory work in the high school. 

Course II. — Ecology. — In this course special attention is 
given to the relation of plants and their environment, much time 
being devoted to the pollination of flowers, especially of our 
economic plants, and the dissemination of the plants, especially 
how our weeds are scattered. Two hours. First Semester. Soph- 
omore year. 

Course III. — Histology. — In this course the student studies 
the minute structure of plants. In the lectures a discussion of 
the cell, its parts and constituents, how cells multiply, tissue and 
tissue systems. These subjects are studied in the light of modern 
investigations. Three lectures and oen laboratory. Four hours. 
Second semester. Sophomore year. 

Course IV. — Cryptogam ic Botany. — The first semester of the 
Junior year is devoted to the study of cryptogams from a sys- 
tematic standpoint. Special attention is given to "rusts," "smuts/" 
and "mildews." The morphology and life history of the different 
groups of cryptograms are considered. Lectures and laboratory, 
with frequent excursions. Four hours. First semester. Junior 

Course V. — Vegetable Pathology. — In this course plant dis- 
eases of the farm, garden and horticultural crops are taken up. 
In this course, lectures on the more injurious of the fungus dis- 
eases of cultivated plants are considered in a more extended way 
than is possible in Course IV. 

The theory of immunity and prevention of diseases, rotation 
of crops and fungicides are considered. In this course the dis- 
eases are treated from the standpoint of the host plant. First 
semester. Senior year. Two or five hours. 

classification of bacteria. Second semester. Junior year. Two 
hours. 

Course VI. — Advanced Course in Cryptogamic Botany. — An 
advanced course in crytogamic botany is given, especially with 
reference to the injurious fungi such as rusts, smuts, molds and 
mildews. Three hours. 

Course VII. — Bacteriology. — Bacteriology bears an important 
relation to many different agricultural problems. In Course VII 
special attention is given to the technique of the subject, the 
making of media and the growing of ordinary saprophytic bac- 
teria with special lectures on the diseases of animals and the 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 139 

classification of bacteria. Second Semester, Junior year. Two 
hours. 

Course VIII. — Advanced Bacteriology. — This is an elective 
study, special attention being given to the study of the more 
intimate relations of bacteria to agriculture, such as bacteria 
of the soil and water. Second Semester, Senior year. Three 
hours. 

Course X. — Economic Botany. — In this course special atten- 
tion is given to our cultivated plants, and especially to those used 
as food, such as cereals, clovers, etc. Lectures and laboratory 
work. Two hours. 

Course XI. — Vegetable Physiology. — A course of lectures with 
demonstrations on the functions of plants, nutrition, growth, 
movements and reproduction of higher plants. Lectures and 
laboratory. Second Semester, Senior year. Two hours. 

Course XII. — Vegetable Cytology, and Micro-technique. — A 
study of the cell, and its division in lower and higher plants. 
The use of reagents and staining, methods of sectioning and 
mounting. Recitation and laboratory work. Second Semester, 
Senior year. Three hours. 

Course XIII. — Agrostology. — This course is an elective one. 
It is intended to give the student a general idea of some of the 
more important grasses, not only with reference to their botani- 
cal position, but also with reference to their economic uses, 
especially meadow and pasture grasses; the cereal food products, 
grasses in medicine, grasses as soil binders, and grasses for 
lawn and lawn making. Lecture and laboratory work. First 
Semester, Senior year. Two hours per week. 

Course XIV.— Seeds and Seed Testing.— A short course em- 
bodying the principles of seed testing is given. The principal 
agricultural weed seeds and their detection in commercial seeds, 
as well as the structural characters of the more important 
commercial seeds are studied. The germinative energy of var- 
ious seed and such other features as are important in connection 
with seed testing are considered. First Semester, Senior year. 
Two hours. 

Course XV. — General Systematic Phanerogams. — This course 
takes up a systematic study of Phanerogams. In the lectures, 
the sequence given in Engler's Syllabus is used, special attention 
being given to the horticultural, dendrological and agricultural 
plants. In the laboratory the student becomes familiar with the 



140 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

more important of the plants taken up. Each plant is written 
up from the following view points: History, description, ecology, 
and economic value. Second semester. Junior year. Three or five 
hours. 

Course XIX. — Evolution of Plants. — A course of lectures 
dealing with evolution as applied to plants, theories of evolution, 
heredity, mutation, Mendel's laws, present and past distribution. 
Senior year, First Semester. One hour.. 

Agricultural Economics. 

Course VIII. — Within the whole range of economics there is 
no richer field of opportunity than this; it is almost entirely un- 
worked, and the materials for study are abundant. There is 
hardly a more complex industry than farming and none in which 
economic principles can be better illustrated. On the other hand 
there is no industry where the economic student can more easily 
find an occasion for the application of economic principles to 
concrete problems. In view of these facts the course will begin 
with a study of the principles of economics, which will, of neces- 
sity, occupy a considerable part of the time for a semester. But 
illustrations and examples from agriculture will be used through- 
out. Following this a study of the history of agriculture will be 
made, giving particular attention to the United States. This in 
turn is to be followed by a study of the problems of agriculture, 
such as: Rent, Leasing, Land Ownership, Farm Credit, Farm 
Labor, Tariffs in Relation to Agriculture, Taxation of Land, Rela- 
tion of the State to Agriculture, State Aid and Control in Irriga- 
tion and in Forestry. 

It will not be possible to do more than make a good begin- 
ning in so extended a field in one semester, but it is hoped that 
the way will be open to offer something further in the near future. 

Courses of this kind are being introduced in many of our 
leading colleges and universities and an earnest student will find 
abundant opportunity to turn his efforts to use in this field. Five 
hours. Second semester. Elective for juniors in agricultural 
courses. Dr. Hibbard. 

Comparative Anatomy. 

Prepared for students in Animal Husbandry (Veterinary 
Science, 55), and comprises lectures from models and prepared 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 



141 



specimens, recitations and practical work in dissection. This 
course is given during the First Semester, Senior year. Dr. 
McNeall. 

The Agricultural Club. 

A Students' Agricultural Club holds weekly meetings in 
Agricultural Hall for the consideration of current topics in 
agriculture. A students' reading room is also maintained there, 
and all the leading agricultural journals are kept on file for the 
use of agricultural students. The College Library contains an 
extensive list of agricultural and scientific publications to which 
students are referred for original research and study. 

There are seven societies that hold their weekly meetings 
on Saturday evenings and serve to supplement the literary work 
of the College. All students are urged to join in the work of 
the Agricultural Club and advised to join one of the literary 
societies and to avail themselves of these other adjunct means 
of instruction. The faculty of clear and concise thinking and 
speaking is of incalculable value to the agricultural student. 

Remunerative and Instructive Labor. 

The Agricultural courses afford opportunity to do consider- 
able work in the fields and about the barns and grounds. The 
compensation for services of this kind ranges from 8 to 15 cents 
per hour, according to the merit of the work. Students are 
thus able to earn from one-fourth to one-half their expenses and 
at the same time materially strengthen the practical side of 
their education. A number of the strongest and most capable 
students have been aided in finding employment during vacations 
with successful stockmen on good farms and in various other 
positions in line with their chosen lines of work. Some young 
men have preferred to take a year of practical work in this way 
during their course, and it has invariably proved of marked 
benefit and enabled them to command more desirable and remun- 
erative positions at the completion of their college work. Too 
much emphasis cannot be placed on a thorough understanding of 
the practical application of correct principles in agriculture. 

Special Courses. 

Students desiring shorter courses of study will be permitted 
to take up special courses in accordance with the general 



142 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

regulations governing such work and subject to the approval of 
the Dean of the Division of Agriculture and the President of the 
College. 

Such courses may cover a period of one term, one year or 
two years, but special students are advised to take not less than 
one year's work in any chosen branch and in all cases where 
practicable or possible to do so, students are urged to complete 
the four years' course. The results will fully justify the time 
and expense required and modern agriculture demands thorough 
training, special fitness, and a high order of ability. No degrees 
are granted for less than four years' work. 
Graduate Courses. 

Special facilities are offered for Graduate work in the fol- 
lowing lines as described under the head of graduate work in 
the several departments: 

1. Agronomy, major or minor in 
(a) Farm Crops. 



(b) 


Farm Mechanics. 


(c) 


Soils. 


(d) 


Farm Management. 


2. Dairying. 




(a) 


Dairy Bacteriology. 


(b) 


Dairy Research. 


(c) 


Factory Management. 


(d) 


Cheese Making. 


(e) 


Milk Production. 


3. Animal Husbandry. 


(a) 


Animal Nutrition. 


(b) 


Animal Breeding. 


(c) 


Study of Breeds. 


(d) 


Stock Judging. 


(e) 


Practical Management of Stock. 


4. Horticulture, major or minor in 


(a) 


Pomology. 


(b) 


Plant Breeding. 


(c) 


Greenhouse Work. 


(d) 


Forestry. 


5. Agricultural Chemistry, major or minor in 


(a) 


Chemistry of Soils. 


(b) 


Chemistry of Dairying. 


(c) 


Chemistry of Fields. 


(d) 


Chemistry of Horticulture. 



DIVISION OF AGRICULTURE 143 

The four years' course leads to the defree of B. S. A., 
Bachelor of Scientific Agriculture. Graduate Students are eligi- 
ble for the degree of M. S. A.. Master of Scientific Agriculture. 
This degree is granted only to students who have completed 
a four year course in this or some similar college and completed 
a two year graduate course in scientific and practical agriculture, 
one year of which must be resident work at this College. The 
work required for a post graduate degree is largely in the nature 
of personal research and investigation under the direction of 
professors in charge of the studies chosen. 

Credits For Practical Work. 

Agricultural students who, by previous agreement with the 
head of the department, do practical work on farms, horticultural 
or feeding or breeding establishments, beet sugar factories or 
forestry reservations, of recognized standing, during their course 
of study will be allowed credits on the following basis : Students 
who take practical work of the kind described under the direc- 
tion of the proprietor and render competent and faithful service, 
will, on their return to College and the presentation of a concise 
written report or resume of their observations and experience, 
be entitled to the following credits in the four year courses in 
Agriculture : 

For three months, five hours of elective work in the Junior 
or Senior year; for six months, eight hours; and for one year, 
ten hours; no more than five hours of which shall be credited in 
any one term of the College course. 

Positions. 

The demand for competent young men thoroughly trained 
in practical and scientific agriculture and dairying exceeds the 
supply. We are in constant receipt of inquiries for men combin- 
ing college training with practical experience, good sense and na- 
tive ability. There appears to be no limit to the demand for the 
right kind of men and the compensation for such service is not ex- 
ceeded in any other calling. In view of this demand for well train- 
ed men in the field of agriculture, students are urged to take a full 
four years' course, supplemented with extensive practical work and 
observation. To this end, a number of our best students have 
taken a term or a year out during their course on some of the 



144 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

best farms of this and other states; and many have secured 
employment during vacations in large dairy and horticultural 
establishments where the most valuable practical experience 
can be acquired. The importance of this feature of preparation 
cannot be overestimated and it is urged and recommended even 
where young men are entirely familiar with ordinary agricul- 
tural work. It enables the student to derive more benefit from 
his course in college and fits him for a better and more lucrative 
position after graduation. 

Department of Agriculture Scholarship. 

The State Department of Agriculture offers a scholarship 
prize of $200.00, open to young men of the state not enrolled as 
a regular or special student in any agricultural college, without 
barring students of the special short courses in January. This 
scholarship is to be awarded for the best work in judging live 
stock and corn annually at the state fair in accordance with the 
rules and conditions prescribed by the state department of agri* 
culture governing this contest. 



EXPERIMENT STATION 



10 



146 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



A. B. STORMS, M. A., D. D., 

President. 

C. F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Director. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Animal Husbandry and Vice Director. 

SPENCER A. BEACH, B. S. A., 

Horticulturist. 

L. G. MICHAEL, B. Sc, 

Chemist. 

L. H. PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Botanist. 

H. E. SUMMERS, B. S., 

Entomologist. 

G. L. McKAY, 

Dairying, 

P. G. HOLDEN, M. Sc, B. Pd., 

Agronom ist. 

W. H. STEVENSON, A. B., 

Soils. 

C. J. ZINTHEO, B. Sc, 

Farm Mechanics. 
W. J. RUTHERFORD, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

A. T. ERWIN, M. Sc, 

Assitant Horticulturist, 

E. E. LITTLE, B. S. A., M. S. A., 

Assistant in Horticulture 



Assistant in Agronomy. 

F. W. BOUSKA, B. S. A., 

Dairy Bacteriology. 

C. LARSEN, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Dairying. 

I. O. SCHAUB, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Soils. 

WILL H. OGILVTE, 

Bulletin Editor. 



EXPERIMENT STATION 147 

J. W. JONES, B. S. A., 

Assistant in Agronomy. 

R. E. BUCHANAN, 

Assistant in Botany. 

E. ELLIS, B. S. A., M. S. A., 

Assistant Chemist. 

CHARLOTTE M. KING, 

Artist. 



Assistant Entomologist. 

E. S. GARDNER, 

Photographer 

Experiment Station. 

The investigations of the Experiment Station have an inti- 
mate relation to the college work of instruction, as the problems 
occupying the attention of the Station are those that have a 
material bearing on the profit of the farm, and they are also 
those that are timely, and in need of accurate investigation. 
Whether relating to the field, the feed lot, or the laboratory, the 
aim is to investigate those questions which will have a practical 
relation to successful agriculture. Originality is made a feature of 
the work so far as it is consistent with useful results, and in all 
instances the sole object is to throw light on the truth relating 
to the various principles and practices of the farm. The field 
work strongly supports the instruction of the College in regard 
to the varieties of grains and the method of cultivation, thus 
enabling the student to become acquainted with the latest ideas 
relating to these. Thorough tests are made of the different 
varieties of fodders, grasses and grains. In addition to this, 
complete trials, embodying various crops and systems of culture, 
are carried on extensively each year, with the hope of giving 
direction to the farm management that is best for Iowa. 

The investigations with animals embrace a study of the 
value of different feeds for different features of animal produc- 
tion. The system of feeding, the preparation of different feeds 
are also made the subjects of investigation as far as it is thought 
they may be made a part of the methods of the Iowa farmer. 
Included with these, there have been a large number of trials 



148 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

with the different types of animals suitable for the requirements 
of the market. The object sought in this department of the 
Station work has been to indicate the manner in which the Iowa 
farmer through the employment of animals can realize the most 
from his farm products and add to the fertility of the farm. 
The Experiment Station has reached out in this way to a 
remarkable degree, bringing sheep from Mexico, Colorado and 
Scotland, cattle from Texas and Great Britain, horses from 
Wyoming, Montana and Europe, in its endeavor to thoroughly 
study this very important feature of the farmer's work. The 
data from these experiments is always accessible to the student 
and he has the opportunity of daily observing the development 
of it at every stage. 

The dairy industry is already indebted to the Experiment 
Station for doing much towards establishing it on a surer found- 
ation of accurate knowledge. The Station has always kept in 
closest touch with those engaged in the various lines of the dairy 
industry. Some of the problems which practical men are con- 
stantly meeting and asking aid in solving, are at all times 
objects of experiment by the Dairy Section. The students have 
the advantage of seeing these experiments carried out, and in 
some cases assist in the work themselves. In this way they 
learn not only what are the chief problems to be solved but 
become informed on the methods employed in different lines of 
investigation. The experimental work that has been so far 
conducted, relates mainly to the various problems of butter- 
making while lately features of cheesemaking have been made 
subjects of special study. The records of these are abundantly 
used in class work, together with the results from the later 
investigations in the newer field of bacteriology. 

The Horticultural Department in its connection with the 
Experiment Station affords the student admirable opportunities 
for checking the theory of the class room against the practice of 
the field. The connection of the Department of Horticulture 
with the State Horticultural Society is such that problems 
touching the commercial side of fruit growing receive the closest 
attention. The field equipment of the Department is excellent, 
so that experiments in spraying for the prevention of fungous 
pests and injurious insects may be carried on under the eye of 
the student; this is true also of other phases of orchard routine, 
such as fertilizing, pruning and thinning. The experimental 



EXPERIMENT STATION 149 

nursery work carried on is of decided educational value. In 
plant breeding, extensive experiments have been inaugurated 
and are still in progress. The Station work thus equips the 
student with the practice and technique necessary to a thorough 
horticultural training. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 



152 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



ALBERT BOYNTON STORMS, A. M., D. D., 

President. 

JOHN H. McNEIL, v. m. d., 

Dean of the Faculty and Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine and the 
Principles and Practice of Surgery. 

WALTER A. STUHR, D. V. M., 

Associate Professor of Histology, Pathology and Therapeutics. 

FRED R. AHLERS, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Obstetrics. 

LESLIE M. HURT, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Physiology andgSanitary Science. 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc., M. D., 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer. 

CHARLES F. CURTISS, B. Sc, M. S. A., 

Dean of Division of Agriculture. 

W. J. KENNEDY, B. S. A., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

WILLIAM JOHN RUTHERFORD, B. S. A., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

CARL W. GAY, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, B. Ac, M. Sc, Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology. 

HENRY ELIJAH SUMMERS, B. S., 

Professor of Zoology and Animal Parasites. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

GENERAL JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Hippology, Military Science and Tactics. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 153 

MISS LOLA ANN PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

FRANK WILLIAM BOUSKA, M. Sc. A., 

Assistant Professor of Dairy Bacteriology, 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

GEORGE JUDISCH, 

Lecturer on Pharmacy. 

C. G. LEE, B. S., LL. B. 

Lecturer on Veterinary Jurisprudence. 

WAYNE DINSMORE, B. S. A., 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry, 

R. E. BUCHANAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant Instructor of Botany and Poisonous Plants. 

ESTELLE DENNIS FOGEL, B. A., B. Sc, 

Assistant in Bacteriology. 

ANNOUNCEMENT. 

The Division of Veterinary Science, as before announced, has 
recently extended its prescribed course of study to four years, 
of nine months each, instead of three years of eight months, as it 
has been heretofore. This change, at first, was looked upon by 
some with reserve, inasmuch as it represented the initiative in 
veterinary education in this country. 

Doubt no longer exists concerning the wisdom of this step 
in the advance, and the benefits to be derived from an extended 
course of study are already being appreciated. 

That the new course has met with general approval can be 
seen from the increased attendance in face of advanced entrance 
requirements and increased length of the course of study. The 
former curriculum has been entirely revised and enlarged, and 
in addition has been enriched by a well graded course in stock 
judging and animal nutrition from the department of animal 
husbandry. This latter department is endowed with unexcelled 
facilities for the teaching of this branch of the science of agri- 
culture. 

Specially equipped laboratories afford excellent opportunity 
for the study of anatomy, pharmacy, bacteriology, histology, 
pathology, and the related sciences. 



154 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Students may avail themselves of the advantages offered by 
a very extensive library where access may be had at all times 
to such journals, magazines, experiment station bulletins, and 
other literature as they may desire for reference in their study. 
The Veterinary Department occupies the third floor of Agricul- 
tural Hall where offices, lecture rooms and museum are located. 
The Veterinary Hospital is a three story brick building, conven- 
iently located, and well equipped for conducting clinical as well 
as general hospital work. The College being located in a rich 
stock growing section of the country, is supplied with an abun- 
dance of clinical material for daily demonstration at the hospital. 

Field Open to Qualified Veterinarians. 

The student having completed the course of instruction out- 
lined in this curriculum becomes a veterinarian in the broadest 
sense and competent to enter a wide field of usefulness by any 
of the avenues enumerated. 

A. — General Practice. — In view of the fact that the National 
live stock valuation is estimated at $3,200,000,000, it becomes 
obvious that the graduate possessing fitness and aptitude for this 
kind of work will meet with a ready demand and substantial 
compensation for his services. 

B. — Bureau of Animal Industry. — Veterinarians are in demand 
for inspection work in the Bureau of Animal Industry, United 
States Department of Agriculture, at salaries ranging from 
$1,200.00 to $2,500.00. 

C. — Army. — The Veterinarians in the United States Army 
now have a position similar to that of a commissioned officer. 
The salary is $1,500.00 per year with a ten per cent increase for 
each five years' service up to twenty years with the same 
allowances as a second lieutenant of cavalry. 

These positions are most desirable and with our insular 
possessions give opportunities for wide experience in professional 
work. 

D. — Animal Husbandry. — Qualified veterinarians are called 
upon to act as counsel to the breeder and as guardians to the 
vast live stock industry of the nation. 

E. — Municipal and State Veterinarians. 

F. — Veterinarians to stock farms and corporation stables. 

G. — Veterinarians to Experiment Stations and Instructors in 
Veterinary Colleges. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 155 

Requirements For Admission. 

Candidates having a college degree, a teachers' first grade 
certificate, diploma from an accredited high school or those who 
have passed successfully the matriculate examination of a 
recognied college will be admitted without examination. 

Other candidates for admission will be required, 1: To 
write legibly and correctly an essay of not less than two 
hundred words; 2: To pass a satisfactory examination in Arith- 
metic and in United States History, and to present other evidence 
of sufficient ability to follow with profit the instruction offered 
in the Veterinary course. 

Graduates from recognized schools of Veterinary Science, 
Agriculture, Medicine, Dentistry or Pharmacy will be given credit 
for work pertaining to the course, upon the presentation to the 
faculty of satisfactory standing or upon passing an entrance 
examination. 

Registration and Classification. 

Students are registered and classified by the Dean of the 
Veterinary Faculty. 

A student's relation with the College may be 'discontinued at 
any time during his course, at the discretion of the Faculty. 

All students must enter in September of each year, except 
for advanced standings. 

Length of Semesters and Year. 

The year is divided into two Semesters, one of 16 weeks and 
one of 20 weeks; making a school year of nine months. 

The hospital and dissecting room are open during vacation, 
thus affording the student an opportunity to devote additional 
time to this work. 

Examinations and Degree. 

Examinations are held at the close of each term upon the 
work passed over during that Semester. At the end of each 
year the final examinations are held. Students must have passed 
examinations in all pre-requisite work of a given Semester or 
year before they can proceed with the work of the succeeding 
Semester or year. These examinations are controlled by the 
faculty rules. At the close of the course after passing a satis- 



156 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

factory examination, the student receives the degree of Doctor 
of Veterinary Medicine (D. V. M.). 

Candidates for graduation must be twenty-one years of age, 
of good character and must have passed examinations in all the 
required subjects in the course. 

Membership in the American Veterinary Medical Association. 

Graduates of this school are eligible to membership in the 
American Veterinary Medical Association. 

Veterinary Medical Society. 

The Veterinary Medical Society of the Iowa State College 
was organized by the students for the purpose of investigating 
and discussing subjects relating to Veterinary Science. All 
matriculate students of the four classes are members and the 
diploma of the society is conferred upon graduates. 

Equipment. 

The Veterinary Hospital and the daily free clinics furnish 
an abundance of material for practical work. Situated in an 
extensive stock growing district, the College is especially favored 
in this respect, not only horses, but all species of animals, being 
brought to the hospital for treatment. Senior students are 
assigned cases for diagnosis and treatment under the supervision 
of the clinical professor, thus having an opportunity to apply the 
theoretical knowledge obtained in the class room. During the 
course opportunity is offered to witness all the different opera- 
tions performed in veterinary surgery, together with the methods 
of treating the different internal diseases. Junior students are 
detailed in alphabetical order to assist the pharmacist in the 
compounding of prescriptions, in this way becoming familiar 
with the various forms in which medicines are administered. A 
detailed description of the various branches taught in the course 
is given on the succeeding pages. 

The department occupies quarters in Agricultural Hall. In 
this building are offices for the veterinary members of the 
Faculty, two large lecture rooms for the use of the department, 
a laboratory and a museum. 

The Veterinary Hospital is a substantial brick building three 
stories high, fitted with commodious, well lighted single and box 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 157 

stalls, operating room, office and pharmacy, resident surgeon's 
room, dissecting room, an elevator for the accommodation of the 
patients unable to use the runway to second floor, and is furn- 
ished with all the surgical instruments of modern construction, 
operating table and other important conveniences for hospital 
work. A number of fine grass paddocks directly adjacent to the 
hospital are used for such patients as are likely to be benefitted 
by out door exercise and a grass diet in the season. 

A laboratory constituting part of the Experiment Station has 
recently been equipped. Tnis laboratory is intended for the 
purpose of bacteriological and pathological investigation of the 
diseases of domestic animals. It is supplied with the most 
modern biological apparatus, such as high power microscopes, 
incubators, hot air and steam sterilizers, microtomes, stains, gas, 
water and electric light, and in fact all first class facilities for 
scientific investigation. Specimens are received frequently for 
examination. Students of the Veterinary Division may avail 
themselves of these facilities under the direction of the veterin- 
arian in charge. 

Aside from the facilities which belong especially to the 
Veterinary Division the equipment for instruction in Animal 
Husbandry is very complete. 

The work in botany, chemistry, zoology and other related 
studies is adequately provided for in the special buildings for the 
accommodation of these several departments of college work. 

Library. 

The entire College library of about 15,000 volumes contain- 
ing a good variety of veterinary and medical books and journals 
is open to the veterinary students. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Comparative Anatomy of the Domestic Animals. 

DE. AHLERS. 

This subject is studied through the entire Freshman and 
Sophomore years and embraces Descriptive and Practical Anat- 
omy. 

Descriptive Anatomy is taught by a series of lectures, in- 
cluding the study of the bones, articulations, muscles, circula- 



158 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tory apparatus, the nervous system, the respiratory system, the 
organs of digestion, the urino-genital apparatus and the organs 
of special sense. The lectures are supplemented by demonstra- 
tions from mounted skeletons, prepared specimens, charts and 
an Auzoux clastic model. 

Practical Anatomy comprises a comprehensive and thorough 
course in dissection, which extends through the Freshman and 
Sophomore years. During each year the student is required to 
make two complete dissections of the horse and such parts of 
other animals as may be deemed necessary. Freshman students 
devote their time in the dissecting room to the study of the 
bones, articulations and muscles. Sophomore students make 
special dissection of the nervous system, circulatory apparatus, 
lymphatic glands, organs of special sense and the organs con- 
tained in the abdominal and thoracic cavities. The dissection is 
carried out in a systematic manner under the personal supervi- 
sion and direction of the Professor of Anatomy. Each student is 
required to properly dissect and pass an examination on the part 
assigned before passing to the dissection and study of another 
part. 

The subject is taught in four courses, as follows: 

Course I. — First Semester, Freshman year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course II. — Second Semester, Freshman year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course III. — First Semester, Sophomore year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course IV. — Second Semester, Sophomore year, three lectures 
each week. 

Histology. 



DR. STUHR. 

Histology proper is preceded by a short course in Microscopy. 
This is designed to give the student a working knowledge of the 
microscope and microscopical methods, thus fitting him to study, 
to best advantage, the minute structure of tissues and organs. 

Instruction in Histology is conducted by recitations from a 
standard text, supplemented by a laboratory course. 

Course XXXIII. — Treats of the cell as a unit of structure, 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 159 

and function, and the tissues, their classification and character- 
istics. First Semester, Freshman year, one recitation and one 
laboratory per week. 

Course XXXIV. — Treats of the above tissues in their rela- 
tion to the structure of organs. Second Semester, Freshman 
year, one recitation and one laboratory per week. 

Physiology. 

DR. HURT. 

Physiology is taught by the comparative method, the vital 
phenomena of the domesticated animals being compared with 
those of the human being and the common features pointed out. 
Special attention is given to the variations occurring in the 
functions and extends throughout the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. 

Course XXI. — Higher forms of animal life are nothing more 
than mere association of the simpler organism, the modification 
of whose protoplasm leads to such specialization of function as 
characterizes the different tissues of the body. 

It becomes necessary therefore to acquire some knowledge 
of the simplest expressions of these complex functions as mani- 
fested in the simpler organization. Thus general physiology 
deals with the animal cell, the unit of organization, its origin, 
modification of; form and structure, chemical constitution and 
the various physical and chemical laws which influence its 
nutrition, growth, reproduction and development. 

General physiology is taught throughout the Freshman year 
by a course of lectures one hour per week. 

Course XXII. — This is a continuation of Course XXI through- 
out the Second Semester of the Freshman year. 

Course XXIII. — The study of special physiology is begun in 
the First Semester of the Sophomore year and continued through- 
out the year. It deals more particularly with the special func- 
tions of the various organs and tissues of the body. 

It is taught by two recitations per week. 

Course XXIV. — The subject of physiology is continued in the 
Second Semester of the Sophomore year. 

F. Smith's Manual of Veterinary Physiology is used as a 
text in these courses. 



160 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Pharmacy. 

MR. JUDISCH. 

This subject is taken up in the First Semester of the Fresh- 
man year and continued throughout the year. It consists of 
lectures and laboratory work. . 

Course XXV. — All the official drugs and preparations are 
considered. Special attention is paid to practical pharmaceutical 
problems and manipulations. Each student is required to pre- 
pare at least one of each class of the official preparations. This 
course is given in the First Semester of the Freshman year and 
consists of one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week. 

Course XXVI. — In the Second Semester of the Freshman 
year one lecture and one laboratory exercise each week are de- 
voted to the principles and practical work of the compounding 
of prescriptions. 

Materia Medsca. 

This subject is taught throughout the Freshman year and 
is divided into two courses: 

Course XXVII. — As an introduction to the study of Materia 
Medica the student is first taught to familiarize himself with 
the definition and uses of such terms as he will encounter in 
his subsequent study of the subject. 

The classification of drugs presented is that in accordance 
with their most dominant action and includes all such agents 
as are .employed in the practice of Veterinary Therapeutics. 
Each drug is studied in detail, attention being called to the 
following characters: Official name, common name, origin, mode 
of preparation, description of properties, adulterations, incom- 
patibles, names of therapeutic action and preparations in the 
official U. S. Pharmacopeia. 

Samples of the various drugs and their preparations are 
exhibited as they are discussed in order that the student may 
become more firmly impressed with their leading characters. 
This course is taught by lectures one hour per week throughout 
the First Semester of the Freshman year. 

Course XXVIII.— This is a continuation of Course XXVII 
and is carried throughout the Second Semester of the Freshman 
year. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 161 

Therapeutics. 

DE. STUHR. 

This subject is presented by a course of lectures of one hour 
per week extending throughout the Sophomore and Junior years. 

Course XXIX. — This is begun in the First Semester of the 
Sophomore year. The same classification of drugs is followed 
throughout these courses as was presented in Materia Medica. 
This work is simply carried on from that point where the study 
of Materia Medica ceases. 

The work of this Semester is largely composed of such 
preliminary considerations as lead up to the subsequent study 
of therapeutics proper; thus the work is confined to the study of 
the modes of action of drugs, the physiological laws which 
govern the same, the absorption, elimination and methods of 
administration, dosage, idiosyncrasy, etc. 

This work is supplemented by a course of lectures on 
prescription writing. 

Course XXX. — The study of Therapeutics proper begins in 
the Second Semester of the Sophomore year. 

Each therapeutic agent is considered in detail and the fol- 
lowing features brought out: The physiological and therapeutic 
actions, indications and contra-indications, toxicology and treat- 
ment, modes of administration and dose. 

Course XXXI. — This is a continuation of Course XXX 
throughout the First Semester of the Junior year. 

Course XXXII. — The subject is completed in the Second 
Semester of the Junior year. Lectures dealing with general 
therapeutic measures are presented during the latter part of 
this Semester. 

The entire course is supplemented by reading from standard 
works on the subject. 

Winslow's "Veterinary Materia Medica and Therapeutics," 
is used as a reference. 

Structural Botany. 

PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course IX. — This course begins in the First Semester of the 
Freshman year. The work consists of recitations and lectures. 
The student is expected to become familiar with the morphology 



162 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of flowering plants and the terms used in descriptive botany. In 
studying the identification and selection of drugs it is necessary 
to have a thorough botanical knowledge of general structural 
botany as well as vegetable histology. Vegetable drugs do not 
always consist of the entire plant, but frequently of parts only. 
In this course the general structure of the plant, from the root 
to reproductive organs, is taken up and considered. In the 
laboratory the student takes up the histology of plants, especially 
from the standpoint of pharmacognosy, with a brief survey of 
the more important plants from a systematic standpoint. 

There are two recitations and one laboratory of 54 hours. 
First semester. Freshman year. 

Chemistry. 

PROFESSOR BENNETT. 

Laboratory study is the basis of the work done during the 
first year of the Veterinary Course to become acquainted with 
Inorganic Chemistry and the general principles of Qualitative 
Analysis. Special attention is given to those compounds that 
are important in Veterinary Medicine. Attention is also given to 
inorganic poisons and the general effects of these poisons on 
the animal body. 

During the First Semester of the Sophomore year the stu- 
dents in Veterinary Medicine are given a course in Organic 
Chemistry in which they become acquainted with the various 
hydro-carbons, carbo-hydrates, and nitrogenous compounds, spec- 
ial attention being directed to those substances used in pharma- 
ceutical preparations. 

During the Second Semester of the Sophomore year the 
student studies elementary Physiological Chemistry and a suffi- 
cient amount of the general principles of Quantitative Analysis 
to enable him to make complete analyses of urine. 

The laboratory provides each student with a separate table 
which is furnished with water, gas, and all the needed apparatus 
and re-agents. The cost of this work to the student is the cost 
of the material and apparatus consumed or destroyed in the 
prosecution of the study. 

Poisonous Plants. 

PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course XVI. — The veterinarian is frequently called upon to 
investigate cases of poisoning caused by wild plants. He should 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 163 

therefore be familiar with the plants responsible for poisoning 
live stock. In this course the subject is treated from the histor- 
ical standpoint, with a brief reference to the history of toxicology; 
autointoxication; poisoning from ptomaines, toxins and the 
agents responsible for such poisoning; poisoning by fungi, like 
toadstools, ergot, etc. The life history of these fungi and the 
poisons they produce are considered in detail. The rusts and 
smuts, as possible causes of disease are also considered. The 
higher plants are then taken up in a systematic order, calling 
attention to the poisonous plants in the various orders and means 
for recognizing these plants. 

One lecture and one laboratory, of 48 hours. Second Semes- 
ter, Freshman year. 

Entomology. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

This course (Zoology I), given during the Second Semester 
of the Freshman year, is designed as an introduction to Zoologi- 
cal methods, especially to those of Systematic Zoology. The 
student also gets practice in the determination of insects, which 
is of special use later in his study of the parasites of domestic 
animals. Some training is had in the use of the microscope. 
The lectures deal chiefly with the physiology and life history 
of the different orders of insects. Incidentally the general prin- 
ciples involved in dealing with injurious insects, including para- 
sites, are discussed. 

Pathology. 

DR. STUHR. 

The course in Pathology extends through the Sophomore 
and Junior years, and must be preceded by Normal Histology. 
The work is divided into General Pathology, which treats of the 
causes of disease, its spread and generalization, the protecting 
and healing forces, the disturbances of circulation, retrograde 
disturbances of nutrition, and infiltration, hypertrophy and regen- 
eration, inflammation and tumors; and Special Pathology, which 
treats of the etiology and morbid anatomy of diseases caused by 
streptococci, baccili, higher fungi, protozoa, animal parasites, and 
those infectious diseases, the specific cause of which is not yet 
determined. 



164 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

In the laboratory the student in General Pathology is taught 
the methods of preparation and preservation of gross specimens, 
the preparation of sections for Microscopic study, and the 
general technique of laboratory diagnosis. He is then given 
preparations for the study of the various pathological phenomena 
as they are considered in the class room. 

Course XXXV. — General Pathology. — First Semester, Sopho- 
more year. Two recitations and one laboratory per week. 

Course XXXVI. — General Pathology. — Second Semester, 
Sophomore year. Two recitations and one laboratory per week. 

Course XXXVII. — Special Pathology. — First Semester, Junior 
year. Two recitations per week. 

Course XXXVIII. — Special Pathology. — Second Semester, 
Junior year. Two recitations per week. 

Bacteriology. 

PROFESSOR PAMMEL. 

Course VII. — This subject is taken up in the first semester 
of the Sophomore year and is conducted by laboratory work and 
lectures covering approximately the following ground. 

History. Consideration of the subject from Lewenhoek's dis- 
covery in 1659, followed by the work of Plenciz who assumed a 
causal relation between micro-organisms and contagious diseases. 
The works of Pollender, Davaine, Henle and Pasteur. Theory 
of fermentation. Caginard, Latour and Schmann, Bastian's 
theory of spontaneous generation; Pasteur's refutation; DeBary's 
work in higher fungi. The extravagant claims of Hallier and 
others. Lister's antiseptic treatment of wounds. The work of 
Cohn, Naegeli, Klebs, Pasteur, Buchner, Brefeld and Koch in 
cultivating germs. Rapid progress in recent times. Anthrax, 
tuberculosis and germs in pus. Literature on the subject. 

What are bacteria? Structure, growth, nutrition and repro- 
duction. 

Morphology and systematic position of bacteria. Their 
relation to other plants. Classifications of Ehrenberg, Cohn, De- 
Bary, Van Tiegham, Pasteur, Flugge, Zopf, Migula and Fisher. 
Difficulties in classifying bacteria. Physiological and morpholo- 
gical characters. Methods of sterilization, mounting, staining 
and inoculation. 

History of anthrax, symptomatic anthrax, malignant oedema, 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 165 

tetanus, glanders, tuberculosis, swine plague, hog cholera, typhoid 
fever, diphtheria. The germs of pus, erysipelas, yellow fever, 
cholera nostras, caries of teeth, etc., are discussed. The char- 
acteristic growth and the morphological characters of the germs 
are given. The formation of ptomaines, toxins, and enzymes and 
their relation to disease. 

Muir and Ritchie's "Manual of Bacteriology" is used as a 
text book. 

Recitations once per week. One laboratory 48 hours. First 
Semester, Sophomore year. 

Physical Diagnosis. 

Course LIV. — This course is designed to be introductory to 
the study of Veterinary Medicine. Since a correct diagnosis is 
the basis of all medicine, it is essential that the student be taught 
to recognize the various disturbances of function and the patho- 
logical conditions they indicate. 

The arts and methods of diagnosis are first considered, then 
general examination, special examination of the different appara- 
tuses of the animal body and finally specific examinations, in- 
cluding experimental inoculations as a means of diagnosis, are 
studied. 

One lecture per week. First Semester, Sophomore year. 

Vertebrate Zoology. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

This course (Zoology II), given during the First Semester 
of the Sophomore year, consists mainly of a laboratory study of 
the anatomy, including histology, of a typical vertebrate. This 
serves as an introduction to the methods of gross dissection, 
and gives practice in the use of the microscope. The study of a 
series of other forms of vertebrates follows, leading to a knowl- 
edge of general vertebrate structure. The laboratory work is 
supplemented by lectures on the general morphology and classi- 
fication of vertebrates. 

Animal Parasites. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

In the Second Semester of the Sophomore year is given a 
course (Zoology, VIII), or lectures upon the zoo-parasites of 
domestic animals. Detailed descriptions are given of the life 



168 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

histories of the most important species attacking animals in the 
United States, special emphasis being laid upon such portions 
of their economy as may render them open to treatment by pre- 
ventive or remedial measures. 

Animal Husbandry. 

The following courses of study are given in Animal Hus- 
bandry : 

Course I.— Market Types — Cattle and Sheep — First Semester, 
Sophomore year. This course covers the judging of the different 
market classes of cattle (beef and dual purpose), and sheep 
(mutton and wool). Judging two 2-hour periods per week. Dr. 
Gay, Mr. Dinsmore, Mr. Smith, and Mr. Rubel. 

Course II. — Market Types — Dairy Cattle — Horses and Swine. 
— Second Semester, Sophomore year. This course covers the 
judging of the different market classes of dairy cattle; of horses 
(light and heavy) ; and swine (bacon and fat). Judging two 
2-hour periods per week. Dr. Gay, Mr. Dinsmore, Mr. Smith, 
and Mr. Rubel. 

Course III. — Breed Types — Cattle and Sheep. — First Semes- 
ter, Junior year. This course covers the judging of representa- 
tives of the different breeds according to their official standards; 
also a study of their origin, history and characteristics and 
adaptability to different conditions of climate and soil. Lec- 
tures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 2-hour periods 
per week. Professor Rutherford, Dr. Gay, and Mr. Dinsmore. 

Course IV. — Breed Types — Dairy Cattle — Horses and Swine. 
— Second Semester, Junior year. This course covers the judg- 
ing of representatives of the different breeds according to their 
official standards; also a study of their origin, history and 
characteristics, and adaptability to different conditions of climate 
and soil. Lectures two 1-hour periods per week. Judging two 
2-hour periods per week. Only students who have credits in 
Courses I and II, or credits showing that they have covered the 
same work in some other agricultural college, are eligible to 
Courses III and IV respectively. Professor Rutherford, Dr. Gay, 
and Mr. Dinsmore. 

Course VIII. — Principles of Breeding. — First Semester, Junior 
year. This course embraces a study of the principles of breed- 
ing, including selection, heredity, atavism, variation, fecundity, 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 167 

with the presentation of the methods of breeding, in-and-in 
breeding of pure bred stock are made the subject of study and 
investigation. Two 1-hour periods per week. Professor Ken- 
nedy. 

Course IX. — Animal Nutrition. — Second Semester, Senior 
year. This course includes anatomy and physiology of the 
digestive system, the purpose of nutrition, the theory and prac- 
tical economy of rations for growth, fattening, milk or mainten- 
ance; sanitation of feeds, and hygiene of the farm. Five 1-hour 
periods per week. Professor Kennedy and Mr. Smith. 

Course XI. — Live Stock Management. — First Semester, Junior 
year. The housing, feeding, care and management of beef and 
dairy cattle. 1-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory per week. 
Professor Rutherford and Mr. Dinsmore. 

Course XII. — Livestock Management. — Second Semester, 
Junior year. The housing, feeding, care and management of 
horses, hogs, and sheep. Professor Rutherford and Mr. Dins- 
more. 

Theory and Practice of Veterinary Medicine. 

DR. MCNEIL. 

The study of medicine is begun the First Semester of the 
Junior year and is continued throughout the course. 

Course XL. — First Semester, Junior year, three lectures 
per week. 

Course XLI. — Second Semester, Junior year, three lectures 
per week. 

Course XLI I. — First Semester, Senior year, three lectures 
per week. 

Course XLI 1 1. — Second Semester, Senior year, three lectures 
per week. 

Instruction consists chiefly of lectures supplemented by 
practice in the daily clinics. Courses XL, XLI, XLII cover the 
work on congestion, inflammation and fever, diseases of the 
respiratory system, ciculatory system, blood and lymph; diges- 
tive apparatus, nervous system, genito-urinary system, diseases 
of the eye, skin, and the non-infectious constitutional diseases. 

Course XVIII. is devoted to the study of the history, etiology, 
symptoms, lesions, differential diagnosis and treatment of the 
infectious animal diseases and diseases caused by animal para- 
sites. Assuming the student to have had the prescribed work in 



168 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

bacteriology it is deemed advisable to review the morphology 
and the cultural characteristics of the specific organisms in 
connection with the symptoms and lesions which they produce. 
Thus the importance of a bacteriological examination as a 
means of positive diagnosis is emphasized. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

DR. BARRIMAN. 

Course XLIX. — The Course in Ophthalmology is given in the 
Second Semster of the Senior Year. It consists of one lecture 
per week supplemented by demonstrations upon models and 
cases. 

It is the aim of this course to familiarize the student with 
methods of examination and diagnosis in particular, as well as 
general principles and special forms of treatment. 

PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF SURGERY. 

DR. MCNEIL. 

This subject is taught to Junior and Senior students in four 
courses, as follows: 

Course X. — First Semester, Junior year, three lectures each 
week. 

Course XI. — Second Semester, Junior year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course XII. — First Semester, Senior year, three lectures 
each week. 

Course XIII. — Second Semester, Senior year, three lectures 
each week. 

General Surgery embraces the following subjects: Surgical 
bacteriology, the pathology and treatment of inflammation, dis- 
eases of the bones, nerves, articulations, muscles, tendons, ten- 
don sheaths and bursae; methods of amputation and exarticula- 
tion; suturing and the general treatment of wounds; methods 
of anaesthesia; intra-venous and sub-cutaneous injections; cas- 
tration; methods of restraint in securing animals, and the 
methods of actual cautery. 

Special Surgery includes the surgical diseases of the head, 
neck, thorax, abdomen, urino-genital organs, fore-limb, hind-limb, 
vertebrae, pelvis, and the surgical diseases of the stomach and 
bowels. 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 169 

EMBRYOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR SUMMERS. 

The foundation of this course (Zoology V.), consists of labor- 
atory work on the chick and to a small extent on the frog. The 
lectures deal with the general principles of development, in- 
cluding the structure of the germ cells, maturation and fertiliza- 
tion, and the modifications of cleavage and gastrulation found in 
the different classes of vertebrates. The peculiarities of the 
development of mammals are also discussed. 

HORSESHOEING. 

Course XVI. — This course is devoted to the study of the 
anatomy and physiology of the foot; the relation between the 
form of the foot and direction of the limb; variation in the flight 
of the foot; style of going; the shoeing of normal and irregular 
feet; winter shoeing; hoof nature; correction of defects in gait 
and the methods of shoeing hoofs defective in form or diseased. 
Instruction is by two lectures per week the Second Semester, 
Junior year. 

MILK INSPECTION. 

Dairying XVIII. — This course embraces a thorough study of 
the composition of milk and its products and their variations. 
The Babcock test for finding the amount of butter-fat; the use of 
the lactometer for finding the specific gravity and calculating the 
milk solids are made leading features of the course. The detec- 
tion of the most common adulterations and preservatives in milk 
is also taken up. 

The course consists of one laboratory period and one recita- 
tion per week. It is given in the Second Semester of the Junior 
year. Mr. Bouska. 

SURGICAL ANATOMY. 

Course V. — This work is discussed during the first semester 
of the Senior year, being a continuation of the Course in Anat- 
omy, but studied with special reference to its relation to surgery 
and not as an abstract science. 

The student is taught to apply the systematic anatomy 
studied during the first two years. 

The course embraces surface anatomy, the outline of organs, 



170 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

location of joints, significance of bony projections and muscular 
swells, position, relations and means of recognizing various 
arteries and nerves, relation of tissues in organs to each other, 
including a general review of all practical anatomy. 

PRACTICAL OPERATIVE SURGERY. 

In the Course in Operative Surgery the student is required to 
perform all the operations that are found necessary in veterinary 
practice. Five hours each week are devoted to this work. The 
subject is covered in two courses, as follows: 

Course XIV. — First Semester, Senior year. 

Course XV. — Second Semester, Senior year. 

SANITARY SCIENCE. 

DR. HURT. 

These courses are designed to train the student in all that 
pertains to preventive medicine. 

Course XLIV. — Consists of the consideration of health and 
disease; the etiology of disease, predisposing and exciting; 
means and manner of propagation and transmission of infectious 
diseases; general hygiene and stable sanitation, incuding ventila- 
tion, drainage, selection of site and materials for construction. 
Two lectures per week, First Semester, Senior year. 

Course XLV. — A consideration of practical methods of disin- 
fection with a discussion of disinfecting agents, physical and 
chemical; methods of dipping and dips; principles of serum 
therapy, vaccination and quarantine. During the latter part of 
this course the sanitary police of the individual infectious and 
parasitic animal diseases are discussed. Two lectures per week. 
Second Semester, Senior year. 

MEAT INSPECTION. 

This comparatively new branch of veterinary work is given 
the attention which its present importance deserves. The sub- 
ject is approached from the American point of view, and the 
students are taught how to perform the work with that rapidity 
and thoroughness required by the United States Bureau of 
Animal Industry. The instruction which the student receives 
in the courses in anatomy, physiology, pathology, bacteriology, 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 171 

animal parasites and veterinary medicine makes it possible to 
cover this subject in the one course described below: 

Course XXXIX. — Two lectures are given each week in the 
First Semester of the Senior year, embracing the following 
topics: The physical characters of normal flesh and organs; 
the methods of slaughter; the principles of refrigeration and 
preservation; the effect of accidental and pathological conditions 
on the preservation and edibility of meats. 

The putrefaction of meats and the consequences of the 
ingestion of such meats by man; the effects upon the meat of 
various constitutional and infectious diseases; the transmissibil- 
ity of disease to man the effects of cooking on transmissibility; 
the meat inspection laws of the United States. 

CONFORMATION AND SOUNDNESS. 

Course XVIII. — This course is taught by lectures and prac- 
tical demonstrations upon the living animal. The student studies 
the conformation of the horse with special reference to the 
defects which exist and predispose to pathological changes caus- 
ing unsoundness. 

Comparisons are made between normal and diseased parts 
and a systematic classification arranged to conform to the regions 
and parts involved. 

OBSTETRICS. 

Course XIX. — This course is devoted to physiological ob- 
stetrics; ovulation, oestrum, fecundation, sterility, gestation, the 
hygiene of pregnant animals; and parturition. One hour per 
week, First Semester, Senior year. 

This work is preceded by Zoology V. 

Course XX. — This course is devoted to pathological ob- 
stetrics; the diseases and accidents of pregnancy; dystokia; 
obstetrical operations; the sequelae of parturition; and diseases 
of the young animal. One lecture per week, Second Semester, 
Senior year. 

HIPPOLOGY. 

GENERAL LINCOLN. 

Course XLVII. — It is as essential for the veterinarian to 
maintain the health and strength of the horse as to care for and 
treat the sick and disabled animal. 



172 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

This course studies the horse as a machine; and the bridle, 
saddle and harness as aids in the use of his powers, as well as 
the management of the horse in the stable and in the field so 
as to best maintain his usefulness. 

The following topics are studied : The framework of the 
horse from a mechanical standpoint; bits and bitting; saddling; 
draft and harness. The care of animals in garrison and in the 
field, including watering, feeding and grooming. 

This subject is taught by one lecture per week the Second 
Semester of the Senior year. 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

MR. LEE. 

Course XLVIII. — The work in this course consists of a study 
of the rights and duties of the veterinary practitioner; the rights 
and duties of the owner or value of domestic animals; contracts 
and sales as applied to dealings in live stock; the subject of 
expert testimony. One lecture is given each week in the Second 
Semester of the Senior year. 

CLINICS. 

DRS. MCNEIL, AHLERS AND HURT. 

The practical work afforded by the clinics is considered a 
highly essential part of the instruction given to the student. A 
student's didactic instruction will do him but little good if at the 
same time he is not required to put his knowledge into practice. 
Also, a student shows his fitness for membership in the profes- 
sion chiefly by the degree of aptness which he exhibits in his 
practical work. The clinical training which he gets here gives 
him an opportunity to acquire the aptitude which is requisite 
for his professional work. Free clinics are held at the hospital 
every day from 1 to 3 o'clock p. m. The cases brought to the 
hospital for treatment are assigned to the senior students in 
alphabetical order and the students are required to prepare a 
full report of their examination, diagnosis, and proposed treat- 
ment and hand it to the clinician when he comes to examine the 
case. These reports are then graded by the clinician according 
to their merits. The hospital cases are assigned to the senior 
students who are required to treat them and keep a careful 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 



173 



report of the case under the direction and supervision of the 
clinical instructors. The junior students are required to assist 
the seniors in their clinical and hospital work. The Semester 
grades of the students are made up from their attendance, and 
character of their clinical and hospital work. The clinical 
professor upon examination of a case or performance of an 
operation or administration of internal treatment gives to the 
students a clinical lecture upon the various aspects of the case 
before them. In this exhaustive way each case is made to yield 
the utmost good to the student. Animals of all species are 
brought in considerable numbers to the hospital from the sur- 
rounding excellent stock-growing territory and in this way the 
students come into intimate contact with a great variety of 
diseases, and acquire a familiarity with their treatment such as 
will enable them to give good service to their clients immediately 
upon their entrance into practice. 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



Comparative Anatomy, 3 
Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 1 
Histology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Materia Medica, 1 
Pharmacy, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Structural Botany, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Inorganic Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Military Drill, 2 



(Veterinary, I.) 

(Veterinary, VI.) 

(Veterinary, XXI.) 

(Veterinary, XXXIII.) 

(Veterinary, XXVII.) 
(Veterinary, XXV.) 

(Botany, IX.) 

(Chemistry, I.) 

(Military, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Comparative Anatomy, 3 
Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 1 
Histology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Materia Medica, 1 



(Veterinary, II.) 

(Veterinary, VII.) 

(Veterinary, XXII.) 

(Veterinary, XXXIV.) 

(Veterinary. XXVIII.) 



174 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Pharmacy, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Poisonous Plants and Fungi, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Entomology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Inorganic Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Military Drill, 2 

Sophomore Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Comparative Anatomy, 3 

Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Two 2-hour periods.) 
Therapeutics, 1 
General Pathology, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Bacteriology, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 
Zoology, 4 

(One laboratory period.) 
Physical Diagnosis, 1 
Organic Chemistry, 2 
Military Drill, 2 

SECOND SEMESTEE. 

Comparative Anatomy, 3 

Dissection, 6 

Comparative Physiology, 2 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 2 

(Two 2-hour periods.) 
Therapeutics, 1 
General Pathology, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Animal Parasites, 2 
Physiological Chemistry, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 



(Veterinary, XXVI.) 

(Botany, XVI.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Chemistry, IV.) 

(Miltiary, II.) 



(Veterinary, III.) 

(Veterinary, VIII.) 

(Veterinary, XXIII.) 

(Animal Husbandry, I.) 

(Veterinary, XXIX.) 
(Veterinary, XXXV.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Veterinary, LIV.) 

(Chemistry, X.) 

(Military, in.) 



(Veterinary, IV.) 

(Veterinary, IX.) 

Veterinary, XXIV.) 

(Animal Husbandry, II.) 

(Veterinary, XXX.) 
(Veterinary, XXXVI.) 

(Zoology, VHI.) 
(Chemistry, XIII.) 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 



175 



Military Drill, 2 



Junior Year. 



(Military, IV.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 (Veterinary, XL.) 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 (Veterinary, X.) 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, III.) 
(Two lectures and two judging periods.) 



Principles of Breeding, 2 
Live Stock Management, 1 

(One laboratory period.) 
Therapeutics, 1 
Special Pathology, 2 
Embryology, 3 

(One laboratory period.) 
Clinics, 6 



(Animal Husbandry, VIII.) 
(Animal Husbandry, XI.) 

(Veterinary, XXXI.) 

(Veterinary, XXXVII.) 

(Zoology, V.) 

(Veterinary, L.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 (Veterinary, XLI.) 

Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 (Veterinary, XI.) 

Live Stock and Score Card Practice, 4 (Animal Husbandry, IV.) 
(Two lectures and two judging periods.) 



Live Stock Management, 1 

(One laboratory period.) 

Therapeutics, 1 

Special Pathology, 2 

Milk Inspection, 2 

(One laboratory period.) 

Horse Shoeing, 2 

Clinics, 6 



(Animal Husbandry, XII.) 

(Veterinary, XXXII.) 

(Veterinary, XXXVIII.) 

(Dairying, XVIII.) 

(Veterinary, XVI.) 
(Veterinary, LI.) 



Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 
Principles and Practice of Surgery, 3 
Operative Surgery, 5 
Surgical Anatomy, 1 
Ophthalmology, 1 
Sanitary Science, 2 



(Veterinary, XLH.) 

(Veterinary, XII.) 

(Veterinary, XIV.) 

(Veterinary, V.) 

(Veterinary, XLIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLIV.) 



176 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Obstetrics, 1 
Hippology, 1 
Meat Inspection, 2 
Jurisprudence, 1 
Clinics, 6 



(Veterinary, XIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVI.) 

(Veterinary, XXXIX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVIII.) 

(Veterinary, LII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Theory and Practice of Medicine, 3 

Principles and practice of Surgery, 

Operative Surgery, 5 

Sanitary Science, 2 

Animal Nutrition, 5 

Obstetrics, 1 

Hippology, 1 

Conformation and Soundness, 2 

Clinics, 6 



(Veterinary, XLIII.) 

(Veterinary, XIII.) 

(Veterinary, XV.) 

(Veterinary, XLV.) 

(Animal Husbandry, IX.) 

(Veterinary, XX.) 

(Veterinary, XLVTI.) 

(Veterinary, XVIII.) 

(Veterinary, LIII.) 



TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Dictionary. — Dorland and Gould. 

Anatomy. — Chauveau's "Anatomy of the Domesticated Animals," 
McFadyean's "Comparative Anatomy," McFadyean's "Dis- 
section Guide," Schmaltz's "Atlas der Anatomie des Pferdes." 

Physiology. — F. Smith's "A Manual of Veterinary Physiology," 
"American Text Book of Physiology." 

Histology. — Szymonowicz-MacCallum. 

Materia Medica. — "United States Dispensatory." 

Pharmacy. — "Remington's Practice of Pharmacy." 

Chemistry. — Bennett's "General Chemistry and Qualitative 
Analysis," Remsen's "Organic Chemistry," Bunge's "Physio- 
logical Chemistry." 

Botany. — Atkinson's "Elementary Botany." 

Therapeutics. — Winslow's "Veterinary Materia Medica and Ther- 
apeutics," "Arzneimittellehre fur Tierarzte" by Frohner. 

General Pathology. — Zeigler, Stengel. "Allgemeine Pathologie fur 
Tierarzte" by Kitt. 

Special Pathology. — Moore. Hayes' Translation of "Infective Dis- 
eases of Animals," by Friedberger and Frohner. 

Zoology. — Comstock and Kellogg's "Elements of Insect Anatomy," 
for beginners; none for advanced work. 

Bacteriology. — Muir and Ritchie's "Manual of Bacteriology." 



DIVISION OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 177 

Animal Husbandry. — Craig's "Judging Live Stock." 
Surgery. — Dollar's. Volume I., Operative Technique. 
Surgery. — Dollar's. Volume IL, General Surgery. 
Surgery. — Dollar's. Volume III., Regional Surgery. 

Williams' Surgical Operations. 
Medicine. — Law's "Veterinary Medicine," Hayes* Translation of 

"Infective Diseases of Animals" by Friedberger and Frohner. 
Animal Husbandry. — Shaw's "Animal Breeding." 
Embryology. — Foster and Balfour's "The Elements 01 Embry- 
ology." "An Introduction to Vertebrate Zoology," A. M. Reese. 
Horseshoeing. — "A Text Book of Horseshoeing," by Lungwitz, 

translated by Adams. "Handbook of Horseshoeing," by 

Dollar. 
Milk Inspection. — Farrington and Woll. 
Obstetrics. — Fleming's "Veterinary Obstetrics," Bourney, "Ob- 

stetrique Veterinaire," Dalrymple's "Veterinary Obstetrics," 

De Bruin's "Bovine Obstetrics," translated by Wyman. 
Animal Husbandry. — Jordan's "The Feeding of Animals," Henry's 

"Feeds and Feeding." 
Conformation and Soundness. — Goubaux and Barrier's "Exterior 

of the Horse," translated by Harger; "Hayes' "Points of 

the Horse." 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



180 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



ALBERT BOYNTON STORMS, A. M., D. D., 

President. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 

Dean and Professor of Civil Engineering. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 

Vice-Dean and Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, B. M. E„ M. Sc, 

Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D„ 

Professor of Mining Engineering. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. E., 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

L. E. ASHBAUGH, B. S. in E., Ph. B., 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

FREDERICK ALLEN FISH, M. E. in E. E., 
Acting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

HERBERT W. DOW, B. Sc, M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

EDWARD EVERETT BUGBEE, E. M., 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, M. M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

FRANK C. FRENCH, B. C. E., 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

ADOLPH SHANE, B. S. in E. E. 

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

IRA A. WILLIAMS, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Mining Engineering. 

M. P. CLEGHORN, B. Sc. in E. E. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

EZRA C. POTTER, 
Instructor in Pattern Shop. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 181 

thos. h. Mcdonald, b. c. e., 

Assistant in Civil Engineering in charge of Road Investigations. 

J. E. STEWART, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

JESSE GREENVILLE HUMMEL, B. M. E., 

Instructor in Machine Work. 

P. G. ALLEN, B. S. m M. E. 
Instructor in Mechanical Drawing. 

E. M. SPANGLER, 

Instructor in Pattern Shop. 

J. A. KNESCHE, A. B. 

Instructor in Forge and Foundry. 

CORTES JOHNSON, B. S. in C. E. 

Instructor in Civil Engineering. 

JOHN HENRY LAWTON, 

Assistant in Drawing. 

DAILY M. CURL, 

Assistant in Forge and Foundry. 

FRANK HASKIN RICKER, 
WALTER E. REULING, 

Student Assistants in Machine Shop. 

HORACE LYMAN BLACKMAN, 

Student Assistant in Drawing. 

M. J. REINHART, L. L. HIDINGER, 

Student Assistants in Drawing. 

W. H. GROVER, B. Sc. in E. E. 

Superintendent of Heat, Light and Power. 



EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc. 

Professor of Mathematics and Economic Science. 

GENERAL JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor cf Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc. 

Professor of Chemistry. 

MISS LIZZIE M. ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 

Professor of French and German. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric. 



182 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 

Professor of Public Sneaking. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History. 

RICHARD C. BARRETT, M. A., 

Professor of Civics. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

MISS LOLA PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, M. Di., 

Assistant Professor of English. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ag., Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor in Economic Science. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

E. B. TUTTLE, B. S. in E. E., 

Instructor in Physios. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN G. REED, 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE I. NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

F. WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMMING, B. Sc., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sc, 

Instructor in History. 

WARD MURRAY JONES, B. C. E., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS FLORENCE ANN LUCAS, 

Instructor in French. 

MISS EFFIE ALENE WHITE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ROSE ABEL, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 183 

JOHN F. TRAVIS, A. M., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS BLANCHE ISABEL THOBURN, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MOORE, Ph. M., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS LISLE M'CULLOM, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

MISS DORA GILBERT TOMPKINS, A. M., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS MARGARET B. STANTON, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS ETHEL CESSNA, B. Sc, 
Instructor in History. 

MISS EFFIE MAE McKIM, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM ALFRED BEVAN, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

MISS OLIVE STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian 



NON-RESIDENT LECTURERS. 

JUDGE J. C. DAVIS. 

'Relations of the Railways as Common Carriers to the State and 

Federal Governments." 

J. L. BURGESS, 

General Travelling Auditor, C. & N. W. R'y. 
"Railway Accounting." 

L. R. CLAUSEN, 

Signal Engineer, C. M. & St. P. R'y. 
"Signal Engineering." 

ROBERT QUAYLE, 

Superintendent of Motive Power, C. & N. W. R'y. 
"Motive Power." 

W. H. WHALEN, 

Division Superintendent, C. & N. W. R'y. 
"Relations of the Railways to the Producers." 



184 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

F. P. CR^NDON, 

Tax Commissioner, C. & N. W. R'y. 
"Railway Taxation." 

T. E. CALVERT, 

Chief Engineer, C. B. & Q. R'y. 
"Maintenance of Way." 

GEO. M. DAVIDSON, 

Chemist and Engineer of Tests, C. & N. W. R'y. 
"Outline of Work Carried on in a Railway Testing Laboratory." 

W. F. M. GOSS, M. S., 

Dean of Schools of Engineering, Purdue University. 

"The Engineer and His Work." 

DIVISION OF ENGINEERING. 

A. MARSTON, DEAN, 

Professor of Civil Engineering. 

G. W. BISSELL, VICE DEAN. 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

L. H. SPINNEY, 

Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics. 

S. W. BEYER, 

Professor of Mining Engineering and Geology. 

The work of the Division of Engineering of the College is 
apportioned among four departments, viz.: 

The Department of Mechanical Engineering. 

The Department of Civil Engineering. 

The Department of Electrical Engineering. 

The Department of Mining Engineering. 

Through these departments the College offers systematic 
courses in Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electrical 
Engineering and Mining Engineering, each leading to its appro- 
priate degree. 

These several courses are planned with a view to fitting those 
pursuing them to enter professional engineering work and to 
advance therein more rapidly than would he possible without the 
preparation furnished by a College course. Experience shows 
that the graduates from technical schools generally excel in their 
chosen lines and it is worthy of note in this connection that rail- 
roads, manufacturers and other corporations, as well as munici- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 185 

palities and government departments, are demanding that those 
who seek promotion in their technical departments shall have 
secured a technical training such as can now be obtained in the 
engineering schools of the country. 

It is very manifest, because of the lack of time in the course, 
the multiplicity of general subjects which must be emphasized 
and the lack of uniformity of details in the profession due to the 
local and personal differences which exist in the conduct of engin- 
eering work of all kinds, that no college course in engineering 
can give to a student the training and experience in all the details 
of his profession. Moreover it seldom happens that a student in 
college knows definitely what specific branch of his chosen pro- 
fession he will follow and it would be folly for him to spend his 
time on details which he may never use. A thorough education 
in the branches of pure and applied science which are related to 
professional work is essential. Having this the engineer readily 
acquires familiarity with the details of his work. Without it no 
amount of experience with details alone can give an engineer 
high rank in his profession. 

Therefore it is believed that a college course in engineering 
should be in the first place a training of the mind of the student 
toward ability to think logically, to observe accurately and by the 
application of the former acquirement to the latter to reach cor- 
rect inferences ; in the second place such a course should acquaint 
the student with approved methods of draughting and computing 
with the use and limits of the instruments employed in the every 
day work of his profession and should give him an opportunity 
for experimental work bearing upon engineering problems; in the 
third place such a course should provide that the student acquire 
the art of expressing himself, publicly and privately, in good Eng- 
lish and should furnish him with some knowledge of the history 
of his own and preceding times, thus equipping him to be an orna- 
ment to his profession, and an enlightened member of society. 

In accordance with the views above expressed the engineer- 
ing courses of this college include a variety of studies. These may 
be conveniently grouped as culture studies, training or disciplin- 
ary studies, professional studies, and practical work. 

CULTURE STUDIES. 

Two years' work in modern languages, (French or German) 
three years' work in English, culminating in seminar work, two 



186 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

years' work in history required and one year elective, economic 
science and civics are found in all courses. 

The French or German serves the double purpose of giving 
access to foreign technical literature and of aiding the work in 
English. History, economic science and civics cultivate interest 
in mankind at large and are thus broadening to the student. 

If possible the amount of time devoted to culture studies 
would be increased, because it is believed that the engineering 
graduate profits by the time spent in general study almost as 
much as by that devoted to the professional studies. 

TRAINING STUDIES. 

Mathematics and physics constitute the backbone of engin- 
eering and of the engineer because by their study are secured 
habits of logical thinking and a knowledge of the fundamental 
principles of matter — the laws of nature. 

Mathematics. — The study of Mathematics begins in the Aca- 
demic course and extends through the Sophomore year. 

Advanced Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, Plane Trigo- 
nometry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus are included in this 
course. 

Applied Mathematics, e. g., analytical mechanics and hy- 
draulics, are studied in the Junior and Senior years. 

Physics. — The course in Physics is begun in the Sophomore 
Year. The ground of mechanics, heat, light, and sound is very 
thoroughly covered. In the Junior Year the subject of electricity 
and magnetism is introduced and the engineering student begins 
elementary laboratory work in physical measurements. 

Students in mechanical engineering and electrical engineer- 
ing continue work in physics in the Senior Year. 

Chemistry. — Chemistry is also a training study, especially 
in laboratory work, where habits of observing and recording facts 
are thoroughly instilled. The study also serves as a preparation 
for the study of the materials of engineering and other profes- 
sional studies. With the increase in the application of both chem- 
istry and engineering to the arts, as in electrolytic treatment of 
ores, the refining of metals, the manufacture of cement and in 
many other industrial operations, the subject of chemistry has 
an important place in the training of engineers. 

The study of chemistry is pursued in the first and second 
semesters of the Sophomore year of this course. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 187 

The text book work extends through the year and parallel 
thereto is a course in laboratory work, wherein the student be- 
comes familiar with the general laboratory methods for a qualita- 
tive analysis. 

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES AND PRACTICAL WORK. 

Considerable time in the Junior and Senior Years is given by 
all engineering students to work having practical bearing on their 
profession; the object being to correlate, in some measure, theory 
and practice. 

Draughting, shop work and field work are begun upon en- 
trance and continued in proper proportions throughout the Sev- 
eral courses. By their means students are frequently able to ob- 
tain valuable practical experience during their vacations and are 
thereby, in turn, benefited by being able to see the usefulness of 
their college work more clearly than before. 

By such vacation work the student is placed in a measure, in 
the position of the so called practical engineer, who, if he be hon- 
est with himself, wishes for the advantages of a technical educa- 
tion. 

In the professional studies the student, through his teachers, 
text books, and actual practice gets into touch with the problems 
which the engineers of the day are trying to solve, and thus 
learns to appreciate the difl&culties which confront them. 

The professional and practical studies culminate in the grad- 
uation thesis in which the student is expected to show energy, 
determination, resourcefulness and discrimination in the solving 
of a problem whose solution will add something to the store of 
engineering knowledge. 

A certain amount of undergraduate work and a large amount 
of graduate work as well as the research work carried on by the 
individual members of the engineering faculty is devoted to the 
various industrial interests of the state. 

Advanced students are given an opportunity to assist in all 
research or commercial work which is being conducted by the 
engineering departments. 

BUILDINGS AND EQUIPMENT. 

The buildings occupied exclusively by the Division of Engin- 
eering are the Engineering Hall, the Engineering Laboratory, the 
Power Station, the Forge Shop and Foundry, the Pattern Shop 



188 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the Locomotive Laboratory, and the Ceramic Laboratory. 

Engineering Hall. — This building, completed for occupancy 
at the opening of the spring term, 1903, is a fire proof building, 
four stories in height, having a frontage of 208 feet, a depth of 
70 feet, with a semicircular wing at back, three stories in height. 
The architecture is classic in treatment. The exterior is Bed- 
ford stone with plate glass windows. The interior is finished in 
pressed brick, with enameled brick in corridors and lavatories. 

The building is heated and ventilated by the hot blast system 
with automatic regulation, is electric lighted and equipped with 
modern plumbing. 

On the first floor are located the dynamo laboratory, work- 
shop and special laboratories of the department of electrical en- 
gineering, the cement laboratories of the department of civil en- 
gineering, the metallurgical laboratory of the department of min- 
ing engineering, and research rooms of the department of mechan- 
ical engineering. Also public lavatories for men and women. The 
corridor of this floor is furnished with 400 lockers for students. 

On the second and third floors are respectively the offices of 
the departments of Mechanical Engineering and Electrical Engin- 
eering, and of the departments of Civil Engineering and Mining 
Engineering. On the second floor is the general assembly room, 
seating 400, two lecture rooms of the department of Mechanical 
Engineering, two laboratories for electrical engineering and in- 
strument and cabinet rooms of the department of Electrical En- 
gineering. 

On the third floor are class, draughting and seminar rooms of 
the department of Civil Engineering, class and seminar rooms and 
museum of the department of Mining Engineering, a general 
engineering museum and a faculty room. 

On the fourth floor are two draughting rooms and office of the 
department of Mechanical Engineering, draughting and instru- 
ment rooms of the department of Civil Engineering and photo- 
graphic and blue-print rooms for the joint use of all departments. 

The heating and ventilating apparatus is located in the base- 
ment, steam therefor being supplied through a tunnel communi- 
cating with the Power House. 

The interior finish is light antique oak and the furniture is 
golden oak. Ample blackboards, convenient and comfortable fur- 
niture and furnishings are provided for the needs of the several 
departments. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 189 

Engineering Laboratory.— This building, formerly the prin- 
cipal engineering building and headquarters of the several de- 
partments, is now used for machine shop and engineering labor- 
atory purposes. The arrangement and equipment of this building 
are described at length in connection with the mechanical and 
civil engineering departments. 

Power Station. — This is a one story brick building, 36x120, 
devoted to the lighting and pumping plants of the College, and 
to the heating plant for the engineering buildings. All of the 
equipment is used for purposes of instruction, as far as this 
does not interfere with its other uses. The building contains an 
engine and dynamo room, a boiler room and a pump room. 

Forge Shop and Foundry. — This is a one story brick building 
38x78 feet, containing the equipment for instruction in forge shop 
and foundry practice. The roof trusses are of steel and calculated 
to carry traveling cranes for transferring heavy castings and 
forgings. 

Pattern Shop. — This is a one story brick building, 38x120 feet, 
devoted to the work of instruction in bench work, wood turning 
and pattern work. A fire proof room is provided for the storage of 
patterns. 

Locomotive Laboratory. — For the temporary protection of the 
locomotives donated to the Department of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing by the Chicago & Northwestern railway and by the estate of 
S. H. Mallory, a corrugated iron structure has been provided. 

Ceramic Laboratory. — A small brick building is being fitted 
up with brick and tile making machinery, and a small kiln is 
being built, to enable the brick and pottery clays of the state to 
be tested, to determine their values for manufacturing purposes, 
and the methods of manufacture to which they are adapted. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

The following general courses are given by the Dean and the 
Vice Dean and are included in tne course of study of each of the 
four engineering departments: 

Engineering I. — History of Engineering. — This is a course of 
lectures in the second semester of the Senior Year of all engin- 
eering courses. The early development of engineering, as traced 
from history and from the remains of ancient works, will be 
discussed and the development of engineering in later periods 



190 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and its growth into a separate profession followed. Especial 
study will be given to the effect on civilization and general his- 
tory and economic problems of the several inventions and other 
improvements which have marked the development of engineer- 
ing. The lives of the more famous engineers will be discussed, 
and also the development of the general technical principles of 
engineering. Dean Marston. 

Engineering II.— Specifications and Contracts. — One lecture 
or recitation per week, first semester, Senior Year in all engin- 
eering courses. Text-book, Engineering Contracts and Specifica- 
tions, Johnson. Vice Dean Bissell. 

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

G. W. BISSELL, PROFESSOR. 

W. H. MEEKER, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

H. W. DOW AND W. M. WILSON, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

M. P. CLEGHORN, E. C POTTER, J. G. HUMMEL, J. A. KNESCHE, F. G. 

ALLEN, JOHN LAWTON, D. M. CURL AND E. M. SPANGLER, INSTRUCTORS. 

F. H. RICKER, W. E. REULING, F. H. BLACKMAN, AND A. H. HOFFMAN, 

STUDENT ASSISTANTS. 

The headquarters of this department are in Engineering Hall. 
The principal offices are on the second floor. On the same floor 
lire a lecture room and a combination class and drawing room. 
On the first floor are two rooms devoted to research work in me- 
chanical engineering. On the fourth floor are two draughting 
rooms accommodating 200 students at one time, fitted with com- 
bination drawing tables, instrument cabinets and boards, whereby 
600 students can be assigned to mechanical drawing and design- 
ing in the department. In conjunction with these rooms is a com- 
modious office for the instructing staff in drawing. In addition 
the department has a common interest in and use of a photo- 
graphic room, a blue print room on the fourth floor, the engin- 
eering museum, and faculty room on the third floor and the as- 
sembly room on the second floor. 

The draughting and class and lecture rooms are equipped 
with ample blackboard space and the oflices are fitted with the 
most convenient furniture for efficient and comfortable adminis- 
tration of the interests of the department. 

In addition to the above space in the new Engineering Hall, 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 191 

the department occupies the Engineering Laboratory, the Power 
House, the Forge and Foundry, the Pattern Shop and the Locomo- 
tive Laboratory. 

In the Engineering Laboratory the basement is used as a hy- 
draulic laboratory conjointly with the Department of Civil Engin- 
eering, the first floor is used as a machine shop, the second and 
third floors as an engineering laboratory. 

SHOP WORK. 

Students in mechanical engineering pursue the full course in 
shop work, which consists of eight hours per week for three and 
one-half years. Partial courses are given to the students in the 
mining and electrical engineering courses. 

The system of instruction in the several shops begins with 
graded exercises calculated to familiarize the student with tools 
and with the materials used. The exercises are supplanted as 
soon as possible by work on machines or parts thereof which are 
to be put into actual use. By this arrangement greater interest 
is maintained in the work than would be possible with a stricft 
adherence to the exercise system. The object of the shop work 
is not to teach trades, but to acquaint the student with the tools, 
materials and difficulties of shop practice and to establish in Ihe 
mind principles which will aid him in designing and construction 
work in the other studies of his course and in his professional 
career. 

The machine shops are equipped with a twenty-four by twen- 
ty-four inch planer, a milling machine, a universal grinding ma- 
chine, a shaper, a drill press, two emery grinders, a polishing 
wheel, a power hack saw, a cutting off machine, eight engine 
lathes of capacities from ten to twenty inch swing and three to 
ten feet between centers, and three speed and drilling lathes to- 
gether with the usual assortment of small tools in the tool room. 
Power is furnished to this shop by an electric motor. 

The pattern shop is a brick building, one story high with 
spacious attic for storage of lumber. The building is one hundred 
and twenty feet long by forty feet wide. A tool room twelve 
by twenty feet is screened off in the center. A fire proof room 
is provided for patterns. The equipment of the pattern shop 
consists of a universal buzz saw, a mortising machine, planer, 
buzz planer, band saw, jig saw, grindstone, fifteen turning lathes, 
benches for thirty students, twenty-four complete sets of small 



192 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tools and a number of special tools. Power for this building is 
furnished by a twenty horse power electric motor. 

The forge and foundry equipment are housed under one roof 
in a brick building eighty by forty feet. A steel truss roof struct- 
ure of substantial construction provides support for an overhead 
traveling crane, which serves the whole floor for handling heavy 
ladles, castings and forgings. Twelve forges, an oil burning an- 
nealing and tempering furnace, donated by the Rockwell Engin- 
eering Co., with blower and exhaust fan, drill press, vises, anvils, 
grindstone and small tools, such as sledges, fullers and swages, 
constitute the equipment for forge work. 

A cupola and blower for melting cast iron, a brass furnace, a 
core oven, core benches, twelve sets of moulder's tools, crucibles 
and a large assortment of flasks are used for foundry work. An 
electric motor supplies power for the forge and foundry. 

Students are advised to work in outside shops during their 
vacations. Experience obtained in this way may be credited in 
the shop work required in the regular course. 

DRAWING. 

The drawing room work begins with free hand drawing and 
drawing, and linear perspective, and is followed successively by 
machine sketching, mechanical, kinematic drawing and design- 
ing. The latter division occupies the last two years of the course. 

The object sought by the drawing room course is to enable 
the student to make, as quickly as possible, neat and accurate 
working drawings, to design, in general and in detail, machines or 
parts thereof, and to apply throughout his knowledge of shop 
methods and his theoretical information acquired in the labora- 
tory and class room. 

The two large drawing rooms on the fourth floor of Engin- 
eering Hall and a part of the combination drawing and class room 
on the second floor of the same building are equipped with fifty 
combination drawing tables, each accommodating four students 
at once. The drawing boards are placed in frames adjustable as 
to height and angle and equipped with parallel rulers. Each unit 
has twelve drawers which are assigned to students for their 
drawing instruments and supplies. 

Extra drawing boards are supplied so that each place can be 
used by more than one student at different periods. 

An extensive collection of blue-prints, photographs, drawings 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 193 

and trade catalogues, as well as machines and parts thereof, con- 
stitute an important part of the working equipment in this branch 
of the work. 

EXPERIMENTAL ENGINEERING. 

Experimental work begins with the Junior Year and extends 
to the end of the course. The instruction in this work is thor- 
ough, its scope being indicated by the following list of experi- 
ments: 

Tensile, tranverse and compression tests of materials, prop- 
erties and lubricants, measurements of power by absorption and 
transmission dynamometers,steam guage and indicator spring cali- 
bration, flue gas analysis, indicator practice, variation of engine 
speed, fan-blower tests, calorimetry, including throttling and sep- 
arating calorimeters, weir and water meter calibration, efficiency 
tests of steam engines, boilers, injectors, and steam heating, elec- 
tric lighting, refrigerating, power and pumping plants, and ther- 
mal analysis of the steam engine, coal calorimetry, besides a num- 
ber of special experiments in the line of investigation. Tests on 
power plants outside of the College are made as frequently as 
possible. The engineering laboratory work usually culminates in 
the thesis, which is an exhaustive investigation of a limited sub- 
ject. From four to five hundred hours of actual time are spent on 
thesis by students in the engineering courses. 

The power house contains the complete electric light and 
power and pumping plants of the College, all of which is avail- 
able for experimental work, and constitutes a part of the engin- 
eering laboratory equipment of the engineering departments of 
the College. In the power house are a 100-H. P. Scotch boiler, a 
51-H. P. Babcock & Wilcox boiler, and a 264-H. P. Cahall horizon- 
tal water tube boiler, a 75-H. P. Straight Line engine, a 50-H. P. 
Ball engine, a 40-H. P. Buckeye engine, and a 35-H. P. Ideal 
engine, with five dynamos alternating and direct current from 15 
to 60 kilowatt capacity. In addition to the above the engineering 
laboratory equipment of the department consists of a 25-H. P. 
Harris Corliss engine with Alden absorption brake, a twelve 
horse power Otto gasoline engine, a five horse power Lennox gas- 
oline engine, a Wheeler condenser, three Worthington and three 
other water meters, two Venturi meters, a Pelton water motor, a 
Holly duplex pump, a Morris Machine Works centrifugal pump, 
injectors, weir and weighing tanks, gas meters, a Crosby steam 
guage tester, fan blowers for experimental work, Westinghouse 



194 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and New York air pumps, a 100,000 pound Riehle testing machine 
with Gray autographic device, a 50,000 pound Olsen testing ma- 
chine, an Olsen torsion testing machine, a Thurston oil tester, a 
complete De La Vergne refrigerating machine, gas and air analy- 
sis apparatus, anemometer, two Thompson, two Crosby and one 
Richards indicators, dynamometers, a Prony brake, Parr coal 
calorimeter, platform scales and other apparatus essential and 
accessory to experimental engineering. 

A Hydraulic Laboratory has been fitted up in the basement 
of Old Engineering Hall. Water is supplied by about 700 feet of 
8 inch and 10 inch cast iron pipe from the College elevated tank, 
of 163,000 gallons capacity. The available head is about 150 feet. 
Arrangements are made for measuring the loss of head from 
friction in the supply pipe and in its special castings. In the 
laboratory a tank in provided oO feet long by 6 feet wide and 4 
feet deep ,which is used as a measuring and discharging tank for 
various pieces of apparatus, and which can also be used for ex- 
periments on the resistance of models to propulsion. The water 
is removed from this tank by two sewers; one 6 inches and the 
other 15 inches in diameter. These are arranged to be used for 
experiments on the laws of flow in sewer pipes. The laboratory is 
also provided with pipes of different sizes so arranged that 
measurements of the friction losses in these pipes and in their 
fittings can be made. Additional apparatus in the nature of hy- 
draulic motors, pumps of various types, and apparatus for experi- 
ments with orifices is being provided. 

Locomotive. The Chicago and Northwestern railway has pre- 
sented to the department an eight-wheel passenger locomotive 
and tender complete with attachments. The locomotive will be 
mounted for experimental work and will be a valuable addition 
to the laboratory equipment. 

The principal dimensions of the locomotive are as follows : 

Cylinder, 16x24 inches. 

Drivers, diameter, 63 inches. 

Driving wheel base, 7 feet, 3 inches. 

Total engine wheel base, 21 feet, 3 inches. 

Total engine and tender wheel base, 42 feet, 3 inches. 

Total weight of engine, 70,000 pounds. 

Weight on drivers 40,000 pounds. 

The estate of S. H. Mallory of Chariton, Iowa, has presented 
a narrow gauge locomotive, of the first in service on the moun- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 195 

tain roads of Colorado. The valve mechanism is of the Wael- 
schert type and the drivers and leading wheels are on a truck 
with the cylinders entirely separate from the boilers. 

The engine is a very interesting machine and will be a nu- 
cleus for a museum of railway mechanical engineering. 

CLASS ROOM WORK. 

In the class room the work is carried on by means of recita- 
tion and lectures, a text book and recitations being used wherever 
practicable; it is necessary, however, to present much material 
not found in text books, and in such cases recourse is had to the 
lecture system. Free use is made of the projection lantern and 
models. 

INSPECTION TRIPS. 

Once each year or oftener visits of inspection are made by 
the Senior class to power and manufacturing plants in Chicago 
and other large centers. These prove of great value to all. 

NON-RESIDENT LECTURES. 

Lectures by men in active engineering work are introduced 
from time to time and serve to add interest to the College work 
by bringing students and teachers in contact with the outside 
fields of engineering application. 

THESIS. 

So far as possible the graduating thesis is directed along 
lines which will produce results directly useful to the industrial 
interests of the State of Iowa, but this object is not furthered to 
the detriment of the student's interest to whom the thesis mrlst 
be first of all an opportunity to think for himself and to apply 
principles previously inculcated in the regular course of his 
studies. 

FEES. 

All students taking shop work or engineering laboratory are 
required to pay a fee to defray the cost of materials, power, and 
breakage. The amount is specified in the description of the 
courses of study. 



196 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AT AMES AND THROUGHOUT 
THE STATE. 

It is the desire of the department to be of all possible service 
to owners and operators of power stations for heat, light and 
power, of machine shops and of manufacturing plants in any line. 

To this end correspondence is invited relating to problems on 
mechanical engineering lines and whenever inquiries by letter or 
in person indicate a need for investigation demanding the tech- 
nical skill and equipment of the department the same will be 
undertaken if possible and the results furnished to all interested. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

The following courses of study are given by the Department 
of Mechanical Engineering: 

Course I. — Analytical Mechanics.— Four recitations per week, 
first semester, Junior Year. Dynamics and Graphical statics. Pro- 
fessors Meeker, Wilson and Mr. Cleghorn. Text-book, Mechanics 
of Engineering, Church. Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX 
are prerequisites. 

Course II. — Analytical Mechanics. — Four recitations per 
week, second semester, Junior Year. Strength of Materials. Pro- 
fessors Meeker, Wilson and Mr. Cleghorn. Text-book same as for 
Course I. Course I is a prerequisite. 

Course III. — Materials of Construction. — Three recitations 
per week, second semester, Junior Year. Professors Meeker and 
Wilson. Text-book, Materials of Construction, Johnson. Course 
XII and Chemistry III and VI are prerequisites. 

Course IV. — Steam Engine. — Three lectures or recitations 
per week, second semester, Junior Year. Theory and practical 
application thereof to the steam engine and other heat engines. 
Professor Dow. Text-book, Thermodynamics of Heat Engines, 
Reeve. Course XII., Physics III. and IV. and Mathematics are pre- 
requisites. 

Course V. — Machine Design. — Three lectures per week, first 
semester, Junior Year. Elements of machine design. Professor 
Bissell. Simultaneous work in Courses I, XII and XXIV required. 

See also Course XXVIII. 

Course VI. — Hydraulics. — Four recitations per week, first 
semester, Senior Year. Professors Meeker and Wilson. Text-book, 
same as for Course I. Courses I and II are prerequisites. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 197 

Course VII. — Steam Engine Design. — Three lectures per week 
first semester, Senior year. A study of the principles involved 
in proportioning the cylinder dimensions of simple, compound 
and triple expansion engines and in the designing of fly-wheels, 
governors, valve-gears, engine shafts, etc. Professor Dow. 
Courses I, II, III and IV are prerequisites. 

Course VII!. — Railway Mechanical Engineering. — Two lec- 
tures or recitations per week, first semester, Senior Year. Pro- 
fessor Bissell. Courses I, II, III, IV, XIII, and XXV are prere- 
quisites. 

Course IX. — Constructive Engineering. — Three lectures per 
week, second semester, Senior Year. Principles of design and 
construction of heating, refrigerating, power, lighting and pump- 
ing plants in general and detail. Professor Bissell. Courses I, II, 
IV and XII are prerequisites. 

Course X. — Thesis. — The equivalent of one hour per week, 
first semester, Senior Year, and 

Course XI. — Thesis. — The equivalent of five hours per week, 
second semester, Senior Year, devoted to special work on an 
assigned topic. Professor Bissell. The thesis can he undertaken 
only by those students in the Department of Mechanical Engin- 
eering who have completed the prescribed course in Mechanical 
Engineering to the end of the Junior Year. The expenses of the 
thesis are adjusted by special arrangement in each case. 

Course XII. — Engineering Laboratory. — One half day, first 
semester, Junior Year, and 

Course XIII. — Engineering Laboratory. — One half day per 
week, second semester, Junior Year. Properties of materials, 
calibration of instruments, valve setting, indicator practice and 
efficiency tests of simple machines. Professor Meeker and Mr. 
Cleghorn. Text-book, Experimental Engineering. Carpenter 
Physics II and IV and Chemistry III and VI are prerequisites. 
Fee, $3.00 for each course, XII and XIII. 

Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days per 
week, first semester, Senior Year, and 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Two half days per 
week, second semester, Senior Year. Efficiency test of stationary, 
and locomotive steam engines, gasoline and hot-air engines, 
boilers, refrigerating machinery and complete plants. Professor 
Bissell. Courses IV, XII and XIII are prerequisites. Fee, $5.00 
for each course, XIV and XV. 



198 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XVI. — Seminar. — One hour per week, first semester, 

and 

Course XVII. — Seminar. — One hour per week, second se- 
mester, Junior and Senior Years for students in Mechanical En- 
gineering. Written papers on assigned topics with discussions 
thereof. Professors Bissell, Meeker and Dow. 

Course XVIII. — Steam Engineering. — One lecture per week, 
with examinations at intervals, on the elementary principles of 
construction and operation of steam engines, boilers and ac- 
cessory apparatus. Professor Bissell. Required of Freshmen in 
Mechanical Engineering, second semester. Elective to Academic 
students in engineering. 

Course XIX (A) — Free-Hand Drawing. — Four hours per 
week, second semester, Academic Year for students in Science 
Course. Use of pencil and pen in sketching from flat copies and 
from objects. Mr. Lawton. 

Course XIX. — Four hours per week, second semester, Acade- 
mic year. Use of pencil and pen in sketching linear perspective, 
for engineering students. 

Course XX. — Machine Sketching. — Three hours per week, sec- 
ond semester, Freshman Year. Machine sketching and me- 
chanical drawing of and from machine parts. Mr. Allen and Mr. 
Lawton. Course XIX or its equivalent is a prerequisite. 

Course XXI. — Mechanical Drawing. — Six hours per week, 
first semester, Freshman Year. The use of drawing instruments 
and practice in lettering. Mr. Allen and Mr. Lawton. 

Course XXII. — Mechanical Drawing. — Six hours per week, 
first semester, Sophomore Year. Working drawings, tracings and 
blue prints of complete machines and their details. Mr. Allen. 
Courses XX and XXI are prerequisites. 

Course XXIII. — Kinematic Drawing. — One lecture and five 
hours drafting per week, second semester, Sophomore Year. The 
relative motion of machine parts, including belting, gearing, 
cams and linkages. Mr. Allen. Course XXII is a prerequisite. 

Course XXIV. — Designing. — Six hours per week, first semes- 
ter, Junior Year, and 

Course XXV. — Designing. — Three hours per week, second 
semester, Junior Year. Design of Steam Boilers. Text-book, 
Steam Boilers, Peabody and Miller. Also a study of the form, 
strength and proportions of the frames and moving parts of 
cranes and other machines, with detail drawings of same. Pro- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 199 

fessor Dow. Text-book, Hand-book of Information, Cambria 
Steel Co. Courses XXII and XXIII are prerequisites and concur- 
rent work in Courses I and II is required. 

Course XXVI. — Designing. — Six hours per week, first semes- 
ter, Senior Year. Each student works out the design of a stand- 
ard type of steam engine with especial attention to the design of 
the fly-wheel and governor for efficient speed regulation and ob« 
tains practice in laying out heating and ventilating plants. Pro- 
fessor Dow. Text-book, Mechanical Engineers' Pocket Book, 
Kent. Courses I, II, III, IV, XXIV and XXV are prerequisites and 
simultaneous work in Course VII is required. 

Course XXVII. — Designing. — Six hours per week, second se- 
mester, Senior Year. The design of complete machines of dif- 
ferent types, including punching machinery, machine tools, spe- 
cial and automatic machinery. Attention is given to methods of 
construction as influenced by cost and other conditions. Practice 
in laying out power plants is given in connection with Course IX. 
Professor Dow. Courses I, II, III, IV and XXIV are prerequisites. 

Course XXVIII. — Mechanical Engineering. — Two lectures per 
week, seeond semester, Junior Year. Mechanical Engineering 
practice, shop construction, management and cost keeping. Pro- 
fessor Bissell. Courses V, XXIV and XXIX to XXXIII are prere- 
quisites. 

Course XXIX. — Shop Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
semester. Bench work and wood turning. Mr. Potter and Mr. 
Spangler. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXX. — Shop Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
semester. Forge work, forging and welding iron and steel dress- 
ing and tempering tools. Mr. Knesche and Mr. Curl. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXI. — Shop Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
semester. Pattern work, making patterns and core boxes for iron 
and brass castings, with allowances for draft, shrinkage and 
finish. Mr. Potter and Mr. Spangler. Courses XXIX and XXXII 
are prerequisites. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXII. — Shop Work. — Eight hours per week, one 
semester. Foundry work, moulding and casting in iron and brass, 
green and dry sand, cores, mixtures and alloys. Mr. Knesche 
and Mr. Curl. Fee, $5.00. 

Course XXXIII. — Shop Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
semester, 



200 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XXXIV. — Shop Work. — Bight hours per week for one 
semester, 

Course XXXV. — Shop-Work. — Eight hours per week for one 
semester. Machine shop. Use of hand and machine tools for 
working iron, steel and brass, finishing and assembling of ma- 
chines and parts thereof. Mr. Hummel. Courses XXIX, XXX, 
XXXI, and XXXII are prerequisites. Pee, $5.00 for each course, 
XXXIII, XXXIV and XXXV. 

COURSE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

* ACADEMIC COUKSE. 
FIRST SEMESTER. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5 (English, I.) 

History, 4 (History, XV.) 

Civics, 2 (Civics, I.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, II or III.) 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 (English, II.) 

French, 5, or (Languages, I.) 

German, $ (Languages, V.) 

History, 2 (History, XVI.) 

THIRD SEMESTER. 

Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, V and Via.) 

English Literature, 5 (Literature, IX.) 

French, 5, or (Languages, II.) 

German, 5 (Languages, VI.) 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 

** Steam Engineering, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIH.) 

Freshman Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Advanced Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, IV.) 

*&tudents who at entrance present satisfactory credits for part of 
the Academic work, or who by examinations pass part of it satisfac- 
torily, will be classified in the remaining studies to the best advantage. 
Frequently such students can take 10 hours of mathematics in pre- 
paring for the Freshman work. Opportunity will be offered during 
the four weeks winter vacations whereby students somewhat deficient 
in mathematics, English or modern language can make up some work 
in those lines under private tutors. 

**Elective upon consultation with Professor of Mechanical Engin- 
eering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



201 



French, 5, or (Languages, III.) 

German, 5 (Languages, VII.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 (English; III.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX., XXX. or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

History, English History, 1 (History, XVII.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, I.) 

Library Work, 4 hours (Library, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Solid Geometry and Plane 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 
Composition, 1 
Descriptive Geometry, 4 
Machine Sketching, 1 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical 
Steam Engineering, 1 
History, Formation of the 
Military Drill, 2 



Trigonometry, 5 (Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VEIL) 

(English, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Engineering, XXIX., XXX. or XXXII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

Union, 1 (History, XVIII.) 

(Military, II.) 



Sophomore Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Analytical Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, VIII.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, in.) 



Calculus, 5 
Physics, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Shop-Work, 2 
Mechanical Drawing, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 2 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIII.) 

(English, VI.) 



(Military, IV.) 



!02 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 

Political Economy, 5 

Electricity and Magnetism, 

Machine Design, 3 

Physical Laboratory, 1 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 

Designing, 2 

Shop-Work, 2 

Seminar, 1 

**Debating, 1 

** History, XlXth Century, 2 



(Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

3 (Physics, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, V.) 

(Physics, XIVA.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVI.) 

(English, VII.) 

(History, VII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Materials of Construction, 3 
Dynamo Electric Machinery, 
Mechanical Engineering, 2 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Designing, 1 
Steam Engine, 3 
Shop-Work, 2 
Seminar, 1 
**Debating, 1 
**History, XlXth Century, 1 



(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

2 (Physics, XA.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXVIII.) 

(Physics XlVb. and XV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XVII.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(History, VIII.) 



Senior Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Steam Engine Design, 3 (Mechanical Engineering, VII.) 

Hydraulics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

♦Railway Mechanical Engineering, 2 (Mechanical Eng., VIII.) 
Designing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXVI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XIV.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXXV.) 

Physical Laboratory 2 (Physics, XX.) 

Specifications and Contracts, 1 (Engineering, II.) 

Seminar, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVI.) 

Thesis, 1 < Mechanical Engineering, X.) 

**History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

^Elective for year 1906. Interchange with M. E. XXVIII for callendar year 

1905. 
**Elective on consultation with the Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 203 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



History of Engineering, 1 (Engineering, I.) 

Constructive Engineering, 3 (Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

Hydraulic Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

Electrical Engineering, 2 (Electrical Engineering, XXXII.) 

Designing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXVII.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XV.) 

Seminar, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVII.) 

Thesis, 5 (Mechanical Engineering, XL) 

*Wood Technology, 3 (Forestry, IV.) 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

A. MARSTON, PROFESSOR, 

L. E. ASHBAUGH, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

F. C FRENCH, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

T. H. MCDONALD, ASSISTANT IN CHARGE OF ROAD INVESTIGATIONS. 

J. E. STEWART, INSTRUCTOR. 

C. JOHNSON, ASSISTANT. 

M. J. REINHART, L. L. HIDINGER, STUDENT ASSISTANTS. 

The Department of Civil Engineering has its headquarters 
in new Engineering Hall. The offices of the Department occupy 
rooms 311, 315, and 316 in the third story of the building. In 
addition, the Department has two large class-rooms and a com- 
bination drawing-room and class-room in the third story of the 
building, a large drawing-room 40 feet by 70 feet in the fourth 
story and an ample sized instrument room in the fourth story, 
besides a cement laboratory and a masonry laboratory in the first 
story. The Department also has the use, in common with the 
other Engineering Departments, of the photographic and blue 
print rooms in the fourth story, the large Engineering Museum in 
the third story, and the large Assembly Room in the second story. 
All of these rooms are finely furnished and equipped throughout. 



•Elective on consultation with the Professor of Mechanical Engin- 
eering. 



204 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

In connection with the offices provision is made for the 
systematizing of all the work of the Department, and card indexes 
for correspondence, equipment, and for general engineering lit- 
erature are provided. 

In addition to the space occupied in the new Engineering Hall 
part of the equipment of the Department is placed in the old 
Engineering Building. Here are located one drawing room, the 
hydraulic laboratory, and most of the apparatus for testing the 
materials of construction. In these lines of work the Depart- 
ments of Civil Engineering and Mechanical Engineering co- 
operate. . 

The Instrumental Surveying Equipment is nearly all kept in 
room 409 on the fourth floor, where suitable cases and racks are 
provided for storing it in a systematic way. The instrumental 
equipment includes eleven complete engineer's transits, one plain 
transit, one astronomical transit, one plane table, one surveyor's 
compass, one railroad compass, one solar compass, six traverse 
tables, eleven engineer's levels, and numerous chains, tapes, 
rods, etc. The Department is also well supplied with minor 
instruments, such as drawing instruments, clinometers, comput- 
ing machines, planimeter, hand levels, etc. This equipment is 
being constantly added to from yearly appropriations. 

In giving out the instruments for the field work in the Civil 
Engineering course the captain of each field party signs a receipt 
for all apparatus taken out, and upon return of the same these 
receipts are cancelled and kept on file. Students are required to 
return all apparatus in as good condition as when taken out. 

Although the instrument room is located on the fourth floor 
of the building an electric elevator is provided, landing within a 
few steps of the door of the room, which makes access to the 
apparatus convenient. 

The Cement Laboratory is located in the first story, occupy- 
ing room 105. Stone topped tables are provided on three sides 
of this room on which the mixing and breaking of briquettes and 
similar work is done. On two sides of the room are provided 
tanks underneath these tables for the storage of briquettes. In- 
vestigations are constantly under way with cements and similar 
substances, so that ample storage room is required. Under the 
stone topped table on the other side of the room are provided 
cement bins for storing cement and standard sand. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 205 

A Fairbanks testing machine is used for breaking the bri- 
quettes. There is an ample supply of molds for making the 
briquettes and the usual apparatus is provided for testing sound- 
ness, fineness, and rate of setting. 

The Masonry Laboratory occupies room 106 of the first floor. 
This room is intended for the testing of building materials, es- 
pecially brick and stone. Laboratory tables are provided for 
microscopic work and other work in this line. Grinding appar- 
atus is arranged for preparing specimens for crushing and other 
tests and is separated from the rest of the room by a glass in- 
closure, the dust from within which is removed to the outside of 
the building through a flue. It is intended to place a large test- 
ing machine in this laboratory. 

The apparatus for freezing and thawing tests of brick and 
stone is also located here. 

The Hydraulic Laboratory is located in the basement of the 
old Engineering Building. The quarters here are not very suit- 
able but it is intended to improve them as soon as possible. Water 
is supplied by about 700 feet of 8 inch and 10 inch cast iron pipe 
from the college elevated tank of 163,000 gallons capacity. The 
available head is about 150 feet. Arrangements are made for 
measuring the loss of head from friction in the supply pipe and 
in its special castings. In the laboratory a tank is provided 50 
feet long by 6 feet wide and 4 feet deep, which is used as a 
measuring and discharging tank for the various pieces of appara- 
tus. The water is removed from this tank by two sewers, one 
6 inches and the other 15 inches in diameter. These are arranged 
to be used in experiments on the laws of flow in sewer pipes. 
The laboratory is also provided with wrought iron pipes of dif- 
ferent sizes, so arranged that measurements of friction losses in 
these pipes and in their fittings can be made. Additional appara- 
tus in the nature of weirs, hydraulic motors and pumps of various 
types is provided. 

Laboratory Facilities for other tests of the materials of con- 
struction are provided for in connection with the Mechanical 
Engineering Department in the old Engineering Building. The 
Civil Engineering Department owns an abrasion testing machine 
and, jointly with the Mechanical Engineering Department, a 
100,000 pound Riehle testing machine. The Civil Engineering 
students also have the use of other testing machines belonging to 
the Mechanical Engineering Department. 



206 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Standard Engineering Plans. — The Department has a large 
collection of blue print plans of bridges, roof trusses, buildings 
and similar structures, which have been kindly donated by the 
principal corporations engaged in structural engineering through- 
out the country. In a similar way, the principal railway com- 
panies of the country have donated standard plans of railway 
structures; and many plans and specifications of water works, 
sewer systems, and other engineering work are also to be found 
in the Department's collection of standard plans. This collec- 
tion is constantly being added to. It is arranged systematically 
in large drawers, in filing cases provided in connection with the 
office equipment. In the general arrangement, plans relating to 
the same subject are kept in the same drawer. In addition, a 
card index is provided whereby any drawing in the collection can 
readily be found. 

The Engineering IViuseum on the third floor of the new En- 
gineering Hall, 60 feet in diameter, is intended for the joint use 
of all the Departments of Engineering. This room is completely 
supplied with museum cases, and space is provided in which will 
be placed large models of engineering structures. The collection 
of specimens for this Museum is just beginning, but the Civil 
Engineering Department has already a set of the full sized sec- 
tions of wrought iron and steel commonly used in engineering 
structures and a collection of specimens of Iowa building brick, 
paving brick, building stone, and other building materials. The 
Museum collection will be extended as rapidly as possible. 

Water Works and Sewage Disposal Plant. — The Civil Engin- 
eering Department designed and supervised the construction of 
the college water-works. The College water tower is the largest 
in the west. It was designed with special reference to its archi- 
tectural appearance and cuts of it have been published in four of 
the books treating of the design of such structures. The pumping 
machinery is so arranged that college students can readily make 
tests of the efficiency of the apparatus as part of the class work. 

The Civil Engineering Department has also designed and 
supervised the construction of the college sewage disposal sys- 
tem. This is the first purification plant installed in the state and 
has been very successful. 

The water works system and sewage disposal plant are 
utilized, so far as possible, to furnish practical object lessons to 
the students in Hydraulic and Sanitary Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 207 

For many years the Civil Engineering Department has been 
engaged in conducting various investigations helpful to the in- 
dustrial interests of Iowa, and the results have been made avail- 
able in numerous publications. This work is now merged in that 
of the Engineering Experiment Station, described later in this 
catalogue. 

The Alumni of the Department. — The Civil Engineering De- 
partment of the Iowa State College is proud of the record made 
by its Alumni, in all branches of Civil Engineering, as shown by 
their eminence as engineers. They are to be found located in 
responsible positions throughout this country and abroad. The 
Department maintains an Alumni Directory and endeavors to 
keep in touch, so far as possible, with its graduates. It is often 
the case that the Department is able to be helpful to the Alumni 
by recommending them for positions. The Department receives 
more and more calls for men to fill good positions. Many of 
these calls come from the older Alumni themselves. 

The nature of the positions open to new graduates may be 
seen from those occupied by last year's class. Of this class, 
which graduated in June, 1904, two are engaged in railway en- 
gineering in Florida, two are employed by the largest dredging 
company in the country (of which an earlier alumnus is presi- 
dent), and are stationed respectively at Savannah, Ga., and 
Washington, D. C, several are engaged in bridge engineering, 
being employed by the American Bridge Co., several are em- 
ployed by Iowa engineering and contracting firms, in lines of 
railway, bridge, water supply, sewerage and drainage engin- 
eering. One is on the engineering corps of the Philippine govern- 
ment, and one is engaged in engineering work in Siam. The 
salaries of these men range up to $100 per month. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

One of the most eminent of American engineers has said, 
"The civil engineer of the new epoch must be an educated man. 
In no profession will this be more necessary." The work of the 
course of study in Civil Engineering has been arranged to give 
as thorough a training as practicable in those fundamental sub- 
jects, a knowledge of which must form the foundation of the 
equipment of the competent civil engineer. The work may be 
classified under the heads, Culture Studies, Mathematical Studies, 
Science Studies, and Professional Studies. 



208 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Culture Studies include History, English, French or German, 
and Political Economy. Thorough work in English is especially 
necessary in the training of the engineer to enable him to express 
himself with the utmost clearness and conciseness, in his reports 
and in papers on technical subjects. No one can attain great 
success as an engineer who fails in these particulars. His suc- 
cess in carying out projects upon which he is engaged will often 
depend upon his ability to convince his superiors or public offi- 
cials of the correctness of his views. The really successful en- 
gineer also must come in close contact with other members of 
his profession, and must exchange information of value with 
them through the medium of papers on technical subjects. For 
the attainment of these ends the engineer should give especial 
attention to the thoroughness of his training in English. The 
work in English begins in the Academic year and continues to 
the end of the Sophomore year. Much training in the writing of 
essays is given, and the last three terms are devoted wholly to 
this kind of work, which is of especial importance to the en- 
gineer. A course in debating is offered throughout the Junior 
year which all students who can do so are advised to elect. 
It is of importance to the engineer to be able to express himself 
creditably orally as well as in writing. The drill in English is 
continued to some extent throughout the Junior and Senior years 
by the work in the Engineering Seminar, which requires careful 
preparation of papers on professional subjects. 

The work in pure mathematics continues throughout the 
Academic course and the Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
includes instruction in Algebra, Plane and Solid Geometry, Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry, Analytical Geometry and Calculus. 
Thorough preparation in mathematics is one of the most essen- 
tial things in an engineer's education, and without it he can 
never pass beyond the mere workman stage in his profession. 
It is especially necessary that he should be able to apply his 
knowledge of mathematics with facility to the actual problems 
he encounters in his professional work. Hence the instruction 
in mathematics is specially directed to giving facility in the solu- 
tion of problems. The work in pure mathematics is supple- 
mented in the Freshman year by a course in Descriptive Geom- 
etry, which gives the application of mathematics to draughting, 
and in the Junior and Senior years by thorough courses in 
Analytical Mechanics, Strength of Materials, and Hydraulics, 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 209 

which give the mathematical applications of physical laws to 
the designing of engineering structures and to the study of the 
laws of liquids. Practical Astronomy is studied in the second 
term of the Senior year. 

The successful engineer must also be thoroughly familiar 
with the scientific principles relating to the laws and forces of 
nature which he must use in his professional work. Instruction 
in the physical sciences begins with Chemistry and Physics in 
the Sophomore year. Geology is taught in the Senior year. 
The College laboratories are especially well fitted for giving 
training in scientific work. It is by a study of scientific subjects 
supplemented by laboratory work that the engineer becomes 
familiar with those sources of power in nature which it is his 
life work to direct for the use and convenience of man. 

For detailed information as to the nature of the professional 
work given in the course in Civil Engineering the reader is re- 
ferred to the statements regarding each specific subject under 
the head of "Courses" below. It may be said here in a general 
way that the instruction in Free-Hand Drawing begins in the 
Academic course. Mechanical Drawing, Lettering, the use of 
Water Colors and Pen Topography are studied in the Sophomore 
year. In the course of instruction in Drawing it is attempted 
to give the student such facility in drawing that he can do 
creditable work in an engineering draughting office. Especial 
attention is paid to the lettering of all drawings, both in the direct 
class work in Lettering, and in the finishing up of all other 
drawings made in connection with his other professional work. 
The student is required to letter them plainly and neatly and 
to make finished plates. Throughout the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior years the student has practice in the preparation of maps 
and of drawings and plans of various engineering structures. 

The work in Field Surveying practice begins in the Fresh- 
man year and continues for three years, seven hours per week. 
The student serves in a subordinate position until he becomes 
familiar with the instruments and the work, and finally he has 
charge of a small party. He becomes familiar with land sur- 
veying, leveling, topographical surveying and railway surveying 
by actual work in the field. It is the aim of the course to give 
the student the facility in the handling of instruments and in 
the carrying out of operations in field surveying which can only 



210 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

be acquired by considerable practice. It is also attempted to 
give him as much experience as possible in the handling of small 
parties of men. Besides the above work students actually camp 
in the field for two weeks in each of three summer vacations, 
and so become familiar with topographical work on a more ex- 
tended scale. In lieu of this summer surveying many students 
obtain renumerative work with engineers throughout the sum- 
mer vacation. Such work, when properly certified to by the 
engineer under whom it is taken, is accepted in lieu of the sum- 
mer camp surveying. Students are encouraged and urged to 
secure positions of this kind, as it not only assists them finan- 
cially, but also is of great benefit to them in connection with 
their professional training. 

A course of instruction in Land and Topographical Surveying 
runs throughout the Sophomore year and one in Railway Engin- 
eering runs throughout the Junior year. 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission are also studied 
in the Junior year. 

Instruction in Roads and Pavements is given in the second 
semester of the Senior year. Sanitary Engineering, Water Works 
Engineering, Bridge Engineering, and Masonry Structures and 
Foundations are taught in the Senior year. For the details of 
each of these courses reference should be made to the informa- 
tion given below under the specific course named. The designing 
of engineering structures by the student begins in t.he second 
semester of the Junior year and continues throughout the Senior 
year. In this work the student actually designs roof trusses and 
stone and steel truss bridges, preparing the working drawings. 
A course of actual practice in testing the various materials of 
construction in the Engineering Laboratory is given in the Junior 
and Senior years, and is of great value in familiarizing the stu- 
dent with methods of testing and with the properties of the 
materials of construction. 

A valuable part of the work of the course is not laid out on 
paper, but is gained by inspection of engineering work on the 
inspection tours arranged for the upper classmen. It is planned 
at least once a year to have the Junior and Senior students go 
on an inspection trip to some point where various engineering 
works can be inspected and their instructive features noted. 
Trips are made to Chicago, St. Paul, St. Louis, and other places. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 211 

Valuable instruction is also obtained by listening to lectures 
given by non-resident lecturers. Practicing engineers are invited 
to the College to give lectures to the engineering students upon 
the subjects in which they are experts. During the present year 
a course of ten railway lectures is being given by prominent 
railway engineers and officials, and is proving of great interest 
and value. Other lines of engineering work are presented in a 
similar manner. 

The work of the course finally culminates in the thesis, an 
original investigation carried on by the student to demonstrate 
his ability to do such work before he graduates. In the past 
large amounts of time have been devoted by students as a rule 
to this work, and it has often been the case that the results have 
been found worthy of publication. Each student should attempt 
to make his thesis one of the things of which he can justly be 
proud throughout the remainder of his professional career. 

The following courses of study are given by the Civil Engin- 
eering Department: 

Course I. — Lettering. — Three hours per week throughout the 
first semester, Freshman year. Text-books, Reinhart's "Lettering" 
and "Technic of Mechanical Drafting." Practice work on plain 
and ornamental alphabets, both free hand and mechanical, with 
special attention to the simple, free hand lettering. Preparation 
of plates illustrating the various types of letters and heir uses 
in working drawings, maps, titltes, etc. Also practice work and 
preparation of plates of conventional symbols used in engineering 
drawings. 

This work is introductory to all other courses in Civil En- 
gineering drawing and designing, and thus continues through- 
out the course. Mr. Stewart. 

Course II. — Rield Work. — Seven hours per week during the 
first semester, Freshman year. Fee, $2.00. See Course III. Prof. 
Ashbaugh, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Johnson. 

Course III. — Field Work. — Seven hours per week during the 
second semester, Freshman year. In Courses II and III the men 
are assigned to do duty as chainmen, axemen and rodmen in the 
squads in Sophomore Surveying and Junior Railway Surveying, 
of which Sophomores and Juniors have charge, besides serving 
as instrument men. Frequent lectures are given on methods of 
field work, note books, mapping, etc. A fee of $2.00 is charged 



212 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

to pay for stakes, ordinary wear of instruments, etc. Professor 

Ashbaugh, Mr. Stewart, and Mr. Johnson. 

Note. The work in Courses II and III is preparatory to the Field 
Work of the Sophomore and Junior years, which takes the same num- 
ber of hours per week each year. Thus the student has the training- 
to be obtained by three years' actual experience in the field. He be- 
gins in a subordinate position, but for a part of the time he is in 
responsible charge of a small party. 

Course IV. — Descriptive Geometry. — Two recitations and six 
hours drawing per week throughout the second semester, Fresh- 
man year. Text-book, MacCord's "Descriptive Geometry." Many 
original problems are also solved in class and in the draughting 
room. Descriptive Geometry is the connecting link between pure 
mathematics and technical drawing, and is taught partly as a 
theoretical and partly as an applied subject. Many of the prob- 
lems have direct application to engineering work. This course 
is open to students who have completed Mechanical Drawing, 
Plane Geometry, and second semester Academic Algebra. Pro- 
fessor French, Mr. Stewart, and Mr. McDonald. 

Course V. — Drawing. Tinting and Shading and Pen Topo- 
graphy. — Six hours per week throughout the second semester, 
Freshman year. 

This work continues Course I, and consists in practice with 
water colors, as used in tinting and in shading, the formation and 
use of topographical symbols, contours and hatchings, and the 
preparation of topographical maps. Course I required. Mr. 
Stewart and Mr. Johnson. 

Course VI. — Drawing, Shades, Shadows and Perspective. — 
Three hours per week throughout the first semester, Sophomore 
year. The drawing is based on the principles of Descriptive 
Geometry, including the solution of a number of problems with 
various sources of light and points of view, and including the 
preparation and architectural rendering of a perspective drawing 
of a building or engineering structure, from the detailed plans. 
This course is open to students who have completed Course IV. 
Mr. Stewart. 

Course VII. — Drawing, Plans of Structures. — Three hours per 
week throughout the second semester, Sophomore year. This 
work continues Course V, and consists in the preparation of 
working drawings for culverts, trestles, cattle guards, switches, 
small bridges and other standard structures, especially railway 
structures. This course is open to students who have completed 
Course V. Prof. French and Mr. Stewart. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 213 

Course VIM. — Surveying. — Two recitations and seven hours 
field work per week throughout the first semester, Sophomore 
year, in the Civil Engineering and Mining Engineering courses, 
and elective throughout the first semester, Junior year, in the 
Animal Husbandry and Dairying courses. 

This course is open to students who have completed Geom- 
etry and Plane Trigonometry. A fee of $3.00 is charged to pay 
for stakes, ordinary wear of instruments, etc. Professor Ash- 
baugh and Mr. Johnson. 

Course IX. — Surveying. — Two recitations and seven hours 
field work per week throughout the second semester, Sophomore 
year, of the Civil Engineering and Mining and Engineering 
courses, continuing Course VIII. Fee $3.00. Professor Ashbaugh 
and Mr. Johnson. 

Courses VIII and IX. — The text-books used are Johnson's 
"Theory and Practice of Surveying" and Elliott's "Engineering 
for Land Drainage." The topics treated in the class-room are the 
use and care of surveying instruments, problems in surveying, 
including methods of calculating areas of tracts of land, the study 
of the United States public land surveys with special reference 
to the restoration of lost or obliterated corners, and sub-division 
of sections, the best methods of doing field work and keeping 
notes for the same, and the making of maps and profiles. 

The study of Drainage Engineering demands special atten- 
tion in this state and the course is adapted to such needs. The 
principles of the subject receive careful attention in the class 
room and are put into immediate practice in the investigation of 
various tracts of land in the vicinity of the College where devel- 
opment by drainage is advisable. The thorough drainage of 
individual farms is considered, and also the engineering and 
legal methods employed on large districts under county control. 
The usual reports of the engineer are required from each stu- 
dent, including complete maps and profiles, estimates of cost, and 
the report of the Commission on the assessment of the various 
properties. During the past few years it has frequently been 
found practicable for students to find renumerative work at drain- 
age engineering at various places in the state in addition to their 
regular class work. 

The field work, which occupies seven hours each week, gives 
practice in the use and adjustment of surveying instruments, 
various methods of careful measurements with tapes, and with 



214 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

transit and level, exact methods of triangulation, and the making 
of surveys for maps and profiles. The data used in the land 
survey practice are obtained from official records at the County 
Recorder's office. The usual office work of making maps and 
profiles for surveys is carried out by each student. Frequent 
reference is made to the best engineering periodicals and the 
students prepare abstracts of articles of interest as the topics 
are studied in the class room. While the aim of this course is 
to hold rigidly to exact methods consistent with results required 
and to' give the student a broad knowledge of principles of sur- 
veying, at the same time he is taught to use the methods em- 
ployed in the best engineering offices that he may be ready to 
fall in line with his associates on entering his actual practice. 

Special attention is given to the various methods of Topo- 
graphical Surveying. During the past year each party has made 
a complete stadia survey of a half section of farm land, each 
student making a map thereof. Other subjects treated in this 
course are Hydrographic Surveying, Mining Surveying, City Sur- 
veying, and Geodetic Surveying. 

Course X. — Railway Engineering. — Three recitations and 
seven hours field work per week throughout the first semester, 
Junior year. See Course XI. For one of the recitations three 
hours office work are substituted part of the term. A fee of 
$3.00 is charged for stakes, ordinary wear of instruments, etc. 
Professor French. 

Course X!. — Railway Engineering. — Three recitations and 

seven hours field work per week, throughout the second semester, 
Junior Year. For one of the recitations three hours' office work 
are substituted during part of the term. Fee $3.00. Professor 
French. 

For Courses X. and XI. the text-books are Searle's "Field 
Engineering/'Crandall's "Transition Curves," Tratman's "Railway 
Track and Track Work," and Professor Marston's and Professor 
French's Notes. In the Notes, practical details of railroad loca- 
tion and construction are given, standard plans for railway struc- 
tures are given and discussed, and the economic theory of railway 
location is treated at some length. In the text-books some of the 
topics are simple, compound and transition curves, the location 
and construction of railways, track standards and maintenance, 
etc. In the field work a preliminary survey of about four miles 
of railway is made, from which a contour map is prepared. On 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 215 

this a "paper location" is laid down, after a careful study to deter- 
mine the best route. This located line is then run in the field 
and cross sectioned. The grading is calculated, bills of material 
for culverts and bridges are made, bridges are staked out, and 
the cost of the line is estimated. 

During the past year complete location surveys for private 
companies, including complete estimates of cost and all the maps, 
profiles and other data needed to inaugurate construction were 
made of two interurban railways in Iowa by parties made up of 
students selected from the regular class, under direction of the 
professor in charge. One of these lines was thirty miles in length. 
It is the general policy to continue such work from time to time 
as opportunity occurs, selecting the students to do the work from 
those showing greatest proficiency in this and related studies. 

Courses X. and XI. are open to students who have completed 
Geometry, Plane Trigonometry, and Courses VIII. and IX. 

Course XII. — Roads and Pavements. — Two recitations per 
week throughout the second semester, Senior Year, in the course 
in Civil Engineering. Text-book, Baker's "Roads and Pavements." 
Among the topics studied are the good roads problem, traffic 
over country roads, tractive resistance, the best method of con- 
structing and maintaining earth roads, gravel roads, and broken 
stone roads, and the costs of various kinds of roads. In the 
study of country roads, especially as relating to Iowa conditions, 
great assistance is given by the fact that the college is by law 
the State Highway Commission of Iowa. All its data, plans, 
maps and publications are available and are largely made use of. 

In connection with pavements among the topics studied are 
city streets and grades, classes and methods of construction of 
pavements, and the costs of various kinds of paving. Professor 
Marston and Mr. McDonald. 

Course XIII. — Roads and Pavements. — Two recitations 
throughout the second semester, Junior year in the courses in 
Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Horticulture. Text-book, 
Baker's "Roads and Pavements." The work is similar to that in 
Course XII. except that during the latter part of the semester less 
attention is paid to city pavements and in place of this the class 
will undertake field and office work in connection with road im- 
provement, such as making survey of road, preparing map and 
profile of improvement, staking out the work, and estimating the 
cost. Professor Marston and Mr. McDonald. 



216 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XIV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Six hours per week 
throughout the second semester, Junior year. Fee $5.00. The 
work is done in the testing laboratories, and consists in making 
the various standard tests of the materials of construction, in- 
cluding cement, building stones, paving brick, wood, cast iron, 
wrought iron, and steel. This course is open to Juniors. Pro- 
fessor French. 

Course XV. — Engineering Laboratory. — Three hours per week 
throughout the first semester, Senior year. Fee, $3.00. The work 
consists of experiments in the Hydraulic laboratory, such as gaug- 
ing the flow of water over weirs, through orifices and in sewer 
pipes, measuring the friction in pipes, and testing the efficiency 
of pumps and hydraulic motors. This course is open to Seniors 
who are at the same time studying hydraulics. Professor French. 
Course XVSL— Designing, Structural. — Two lecture hours and 
four hours designing per week throughout the second semester, 
Junior year. Text-book, Ketchum's "Steel Mill Buildings." A 
study of stresses in roof trusses and mill buildings, followed by 
the design of the building and complete shop details of the roof 
truss and parts of the columns, crane girders, etc. In stress 
calculations graphic analysis is largely used and checked by the 
algebraic methods. Several leading types of trusses, monitors, 
roof and wall coverings, etc., are considered, thus furnishing 
many different subjects for the designs. It is the aim of this 
course to give the student such practice in the use of the stand- 
ard hand-books, methods of design, and the making of shop draw- 
ings, that he may be of some service in the drawing room of a 
bridge company during the summer vacation. Students are urged 
to secure such practice, when possible, during the vacation pre- 
ceding the work of the Senior year. This course is open to stu- 
dents who have completed the first semester Junior work in 
Analytical Mechanics, and are pursuing simultaneously the sec- 
ond semester Junior work in the same subject. Professor Ash- 
baugh. 

Course XIII. — Framed Structures. — Four recitations, one lec- 
ture and eight hours designing per week during the first semester, 
Senior year, continuing Course XVII. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XIX. — Framed Structures. — Three recitations, one lec- 
ture and three hours designing per week during the second semes- 
ter, Senior year, continuing Course XVIII. 

For Courses XVIII. and XIX., the text-books are Merriman 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 217 

and Jacoby's "Roofs and Bridges," and Greene's "Arches," with 
special notes in mimeograph and blue-print form. The class 
room work consists of the study of methods for computing the 
stresses, proportioning members, designing joints, etc., for bridge 
and roof trusses and other framed structures. Many problems in 
stresses are worked out, including various types of simple bridge 
and roof spans, cantilevers, two and three hinged arches, draw 
bridges, towers, etc. A complete design of a bridge is also given 
in class preparatory to the drawing room work. Construction in 
reinforced concrete is also given special attention. 

An outline of the work in designing is as follows, each student 
working independently and usually on a design different from all 
others : Complete design and shop details of a short plate girder, 
a pin connected through highway bridge, a riveted lattice girder, 
and a long plate girder of special type, also design and show 
drawing of a steel water tank and tower. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XX. — Stereotomy. — Six hours per week throughout 
the second semester, Senior year. Reference texts, Greene's 
"Arches," and other works on arches and reinforced concrete by 
Marsh, Cain, Buell and Hill, and others. The works consists of 
the design of stone brick and reinforced concrete arches. This 
course is open to students who have completed Course XVIII. 

Course XXI.— Sanitary Engineering. — Three recitations per 
week throughout the first term, Senior year. Text-book, Folwell's 
"Sewerage," and Professor Marston's Notes. The work consists 
in the study of the principles and methods involved in the design, 
construction and maintenance of sewerage systems. House 
plumbing and sewage disposal are studied in the Notes. Pro- 
fessor Marston. 

Course XXII. — Hydraulic Engineering. — Three recitations per 
week throughout the second semester, Senior year, on the prin- 
ciples and methods involved in the design, construction and main- 
tenance of water works systems. Text-book, Turneaure and 
Russell's "Water Supply Engineering." Professor Marston. 

Course XXIII. — Masonry Structures. — Three recitations per 
week throughout the first semester, Senior year. Text-book 
Baker's "Masonry Structures." The work consists in the study of 
principles involved in the design and construction of foundations, 
and in the design, construction and maintenance of all classes of 
masonry structures. Professor Marston. 

Course XXIV. — Practical Astronomy. — Four recitations and 



218 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

three hours field work per week for the last ten weeks of the first 
semester, Junior year. Required, Mathematics VII. and IX. The 
work covers the ordinary methods of determining latitude, long- 
itude, and time, with their applications to Geodetic Surveying. 
Text-book, Hayford's "Geodetic Astronomy." Professor French. 

Course XXV. — Thesis. — Credit equivalent to one recitation 
per week throughout the first semester, Senior year, is given for 
the thesis work required during that semester. See Course XXVI. 
Professor Marston. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis. — Credit equivalent to three recita- 
tions per week throughout the second semester, Senior year, is 
given for the thesis work required that semester. The credits for 
thesis, Courses XXV. and XXVI. require at least three hours per 
week thesis work throughout the first semester, Senior year, and 
nine hours per week throughout the second semester, Senior year. 
Students are required to put in as much additional time as may 
be necessary to thoroughly work up the subject chosen, and to 
prepare a well-digested and complete writeup of the results. Most 
students devote much extra time to the work. The subject chosen 
must be one requiring original work. It may be the study and 
design of some engineering project (including the surveys), the 
investigation of some engineering question, or an experimental 
investigation. Professor Marston. 

Course XXV EL — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given equiv- 
alent to one recitation per week, first semester, Junior year. See 
Course XXX. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XXVI I!.— -Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given 
equivalent to one recitation per week, second semester, Junior 
year. See Course XXX. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XXtX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given equiv- 
alent to one recitation per week, first semester, Senior year. 
See Course XXX. Professor Ashbaugh. 

Course XXX. — Engineering Seminar. — Credit is given equiva- 
lent to one recitation per week, first semester, Senior year. 
Professor Ashbaugh. 

The Civil Engineering Seminar, Courses XXVII. to XXX., in- 
clusive, meets once each week, while College is in session, and 
has for its members the professors and the instructors in Civil 
Engineering, and all students in the Junior and Senior classes in 
the course in Civil Engineering. At each meeting five students 
give "journal reviews" of the most timely articles and topics 



DIVISION OF ENGINEEEING 219 

found in the current numbers of the technical journals, a large 
number of which are regularly taken by the College Library. 
Another student then reads a paper on some engineering subject. 
Both the journal review and the paper are discussed by the other 
members of the Seminar. The subjects for the papers follow a 
regular, connected program, arranged in advance for each semes- 
ter. 

Course XXXI. — Summer Surveying. — Thirteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Freshman 
year. See Course XXXIII. Professors Ashbaugh and French, 
and Mr. Stewart and Mr. Johnson. 

Course XXXII. — Summer Surveying. — Thirteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Sopho- 
more year. See Course XXXIII. Professors Ashbaugh and French, 
and Mr. Stewart and Mr. Johnson. 

Course XXXIII. — Summer Surveying. — Thirteen entire days' 
work in the field in the summer vacation following the Junior 
year. Professors Ashbaugh and French, and Mr. Stewart and Mr. 
Johnson. 

In the work of Courses XXXI. to XXXIII., inclusive, the 
professors of Civil Engineering and the students in the course 
in Civil Engineering go into camp for fifteen days each summer 
vacation, beginning the Saturday before Commencement, and con- 
duct an organized topographical survey of some region in the 
state. Each year's work continues that of the preceding year, 
until a large area is mapped. At present a strip about three 
miles wide, half on each side of the Des Moines river, south of 
Boone, is being mapped. Lower classmen will serve in subordin- 
ate positions. Upper classmen will have responsible charge of 
parties, and will do the triangulating and final mapping. All 
camp equipage, including tents and cooking utensils, will be fur- 
nished by the College. Students must pay their own traveling 
and living expenses. A corps of student officers has direct charge 
of the work, part of these officers being elected by the students 
and part appointed by the department. It is one of the greatest 
honors in the course of Civil Engineering to be chosen on this 
corps of officers. The list of student officers for the summer 
camp of 1904 was as follows: 

Chief Engineer — N. B. Garver. 

Assistant Chief Engineer — L. L. Hidinger. 

Computer — W. D. Truman. 

Chief Draughtsman — J. W. Johnston. 

Junior Commissary — B. C. Jacobsen. 

Sophomore Commissary — W. D. Maxwell. 

Freshman Commissary — Carl Kupfer. 



220 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



COURSE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 
*Academic Course. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 5 
**Field Work, 2 
Civics, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Civil Engineering, II.) 

(Civics, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 

History, 2 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

**Field Work, 2, or Drawing, 1 



(Mathematics, II. or III.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, XVI.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(Civil Engineering, III. or I.) 



THIRD SEMESTER. 



Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 

English Literature, 5 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Drawing, 2 

**Field Work, 2, or Drawing, 



(Mathematics, V and Via.) 

(Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 

Civil Engineering, III. or V.) 



Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 
French, 5, or 



( Mathematics , IV. ) 
(Languages, III.) 



*Students who at entrance present satisfactory credits for part of 
the Academic work, or who by examination pass part of it satisfac- 
torily, will be classified in the remaining studies to the best advan^ 
tage. Frequently such students can take 10 hours of Mathematics in 
preparing for the Freshman work. 

Opportunity will be offered during the four weeks winter vacations 
whereby students somewhat deficient in Mathematics, English or 
Modern Language can make up some work in those lines under pri- 
vate tutors. 

**The field work and drawing marked thus in the Academic course 
are optional, but all students are urged to take them, with a view 
to preparing to secure remunerative engineering work during the 
summer vacations 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



221 



German, 5 

Civil Engineering Drawing, 1 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 

History, English History, 1 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 

*Field Work, 2 

Military Drill, 2 

*Shop Work, 2 

Library Work, 4 hours 



(Languages, VII.) 

(Civil Engineering, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXL) 

(Civil Engineering, H.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX.) 

(Library, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Composition, 1 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 

Descriptive Geometry, 4 

Civil Engineering Drawing, 2 

*Field Work, 2 

Military Drill, 2 

*Shop Work, 2 

**Summer Surveying, 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages ,VTII.) 

(English, P7.) 

(History, XVIH.) 

(Civil Engineering, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, V.) 

(Civil Engineering, III.) 

(Military, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXXI.) 



Sophomore Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Analytical Geometry, 
Physics, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Chemistry, 5 
Drawing, 1 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 2 



Calculus, 5 
Physics, 5 
Surveying, 4 



(Mechanics, VIII.) 

(Physics, III.) 

(Civil Engineering, VEIL) 

(Chemistry, IH.) 

(Civil Engineering, VI.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, IX.) 



♦Students who have completed Field Work can elect Shop Work. 
**A11 students in Civil Engineering go into camp thirteen days each 
summer vacation and conduct an organized topographical survey. 



222 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Chemistry, 5 

Drawing, 1 

Composition,- 1 

Military Drill, 2 

* Summer Surveying, 2 Weeks, 



(Chemistry, VI.) 

(Civil Engineering, VII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Military, IV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXXII.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Spherical Trigonometry, 2 (Mathematics, VII.) 

Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission, 3 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXI.) 



Practical Astronomy, 3 
Railway Engineering, 5 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Seminar, 1 

***History, XlXth Century 
**Debating, 1 



(Civil Engineering, XXIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, X.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXVII.) 

(History, VII.) 

(English, VII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Materials of Construction, 3 
Railway Engineering, 5 
Political Economy, 5 
Structural Designing, 2 
Engineering Laboratory, 2 
Seminar, 1 
**Debating, 1 

***History, XlXth Century, 2 
* Summer Surveying, 2 weeks 



(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Civil Engineering, XI.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Civil Engineering, XVII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XIV.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXVIH.) 

(English, VlII.) 

(History, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, XXXIII.) 



In place of the two weeks' summer vacation for any year 
there may be substituted not less than four weeks' actual engi- 
neering work done for some competent engineer, a reputable 
firm, or department engaged in engineering work, if certified by 
engineer under whom taken, on regular blank furnished by 
Department of Civil Engineering. 



*A11 students in Civil Engineering go into camp thirteen days each 
summer vacation and conduct an organized topographical survey. 

**Elective, subject to approval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 

***Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to ap- 
proval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 



DIVISION OP ENGINEERING 223 

Senior Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Framed Structures, 7 (Civil Engineering, XVIII.) 

Hydraulics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 

Masonry Structures and Foundations, 3 

(Civil Engineering, XXII.) 
Sanitary Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 (Civil Engineering, XV.) 

Specifications and Contracts, 1 (Engineering, II.) 

*History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

Thesis, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXV.) 

Seminar, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXIX.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Framed Structures, 4 (Civil Engineering, XIX.) 

Geology, 4 (Geology, III.) 

Stereotomy, 2 (Civil Engineering, XX.) 

Roads and Pavements, 2 (Civil Engineering, XII.) 

Hydraulic Engineering, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXII.) 

History of Engineering, 1 (Engineering, I.) 

*History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VIII.) 

Thesis, 3 (Civil Engineering, XXVI.) 

Seminar, 1 (Civil Engineering, XXX.) 

*Wood Technology, 3 (Forestry, IV.) 

DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

LOUIS BEVIER SPINNEY, PROFESSOR. 

FRED A. FISH, ACTING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

ADOLPH SHANE, ACTING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

This department aims to meet the needs of young men who 
have in mind the practice of electrical engineering in any of its 
various applications. In outlining the courses the object in view 
has been to secure for the student a thorough drill in those 
sciences, the principles of which underlie all electrical engi- 
neering practice, to secure for him a training in the application 



*Elective subject to approval of Professor of Civil Engineering. 



224 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of scientific principles to the solution of practical problems in 
engineering, and to familiarize him with such methods of the 
laboratory and testing room as are available for practical and 

commercial determinations. 

The sciences of Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry, are 
emphasized, as it is believed they are of first importance in such 
a course. The attention of the student is directed to the value 
of these subjects and he is urged to give them his most careful 
consideration. 

In recognition of the fact that a knowledge of Mechanical 
Engineering is essential to many electrical engineering operations 
a large part of the student's time is devoted to a training in this 
direction. The mechanical engineering work required of students 
in this course, includes mechanical drawing, shop-work, kine- 
matics, machine design, analytical mechanics, hydraulics, mate- 
rials of construction, engineering laboratory and the study of the 
steam engine. 

Mechanical drawing is taken up in the first term of the 
Freshman year and extends through the Sophomore year. 

Shop Work extends to the end of the Junior year and in- 
cludes work in the carpenter shop, in the forge shop and foundry, 
and in the machine shop. 

In the course in Engineering Laboratory the work consists in 
the tests of strength of materials, viscosity of oils, efficiency of 
belt transmission, measurement of power, etc. 

The study of the steam engine is made as practical as pos- 
sible by the taking and studying of indicator cards, the setting 
of valves, the measurements of clearance, etc. 

These several topics are fully discussed elsewhere under the 
head of Mechanical Engineering. 

Physics is the basis of the study of electricity and magnet- 
ism, the phenomena of which underlie electrical engineering 
theory and design, and is manifestly of sufficient importance to 
demand considerable time and attention in the training of the 
electrical engineer. In addition to the work in physics prescribed 
for all engineering students, the electrical engineering student 
spends six to twelve hours per week in the Junior and Senior 
years in the physical laboratory and class room. 

Specialization begins in the Junior year with the advanced 
course in Electricity and Magnetism. 

Laboratory work begins in the first semester of the Junior 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 225 

year with a two hours (i. e. two afternoons per week) course in 
general physics. Laboratory work in electricity and magnetism, 
including work in the dynamo room and testing laboratory ex- 
tends throughout the last two years of the course. 

The first work in the physical laboratory embodies the accur- 
ate measurements of length, mass and time, the adjustment and 
use of physical instruments and the determinations of physical 
constants. In the laboratory course in electricity and magnetism 
the student makes a study of primary and secondary batteries 
and the electrical instruments of the laboratory, the determina- 
tion of the constants of measuring instruments and the methods 
of measuring the several electrical quantities. 

The laboratory work in Light consists largely in photometric 
measurements of various forms of commercial lamps. 

In the laboratory work of the Senior year the more practical 
applications of the prniciples of electro-magnetism are studied, 
together with the principles of the magnetic circuit, of current 
flow, etc. 

The topics of electric wiring, power transmission, electro- 
chemistry, telegraphy, telephony and electric signalling receive 
attention in the latter part of the course. The laboratory work 
in these various topics is made to conform to the text-book and 
lecture work. 

The study of alternating currents is taken up in the Junior 
year. In the class-room work much stress is placed upon the 
theory of alternating currents and in the laboratory the student 
is afforded opportunity to study and familiarize himself with the 
phenomena peculiar to such currents. 

The department possesses seventeen experimental dynamos, 
including two arc machines, one 250 light Diamond alternator 
and one 10 light Pony alternator, also one 25-horse-power M. P. 
Ahlms-Edwards, direct current motor; also one 45 K. W. Edison 
generator, and other series and shunt wound continuous current 
machines. There are also transformers of various types and a 
storage battery of sixty cells. 

In addition to this equipment the student has access, for 
experimental and test purposes, to the electric machinery of the 
College power house and lighting plant. Among other machines 
in this plant are two 15 K. W. Edison dynamos; one 30 K. W. 
Edison dynamo; one 15 K. W. 500 volt generator; one four-pole 
18 K. W. compound- wound generator; one 15 K. W. alternator; 

15 



226 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

one 30 K. W. alternator, and one 60 K. W. alternator. There is 
also a series of motors for driving the machinery of the Mechan- 
ical Engineering Department which range in size from five to 
twelve horse-power, which are available for test purposes. 

An extended system of wiring connects all rooms of the 
department with the switchboards of the dynamo laboratory and 
the apparatus room. At these switchboards are the terminals 
of a line connecting with a 110 volt, 45 K. W. direct-current 
machine, which is available as a current source during the day. 
During the evening hours there are available 110 volt direct or 
alternating current circuits. 

The courses offered by the Department of Electrical Engi- 
neering are outlined specifically below. The course numbers 
are those given in the discussion of courses offered by the De- 
partment of Physics: 

Course III. — Mechanics and Heat. — First semester. 

Course IV. — Light and Sound, Electricity and Magnetism. — 
Second semester. Two lectures and three recitations per week. 
Mathematics IV., V. and VI. required. Course III. is a prerequisite 
of Course IV. 

In this course stress is placed upon the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the subject and a very thorough study is made of 
vector quantities and their graphical treatment in problem work. 

The various subjects are discussed from a mathematical 
standpoint, and the student is urged to familiarize himself with 
the theoretical side of the work, as it is believed such a founda- 
tion is very helpful, if not absolutely essential to the work which 
follows. Text-book, Hastings and Beach, "General Physics." Pro- 
fessor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism. — Three hours per 
week, first semester. Physics III. and D7., and Mathematics IX. 
required. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in the 
elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Discussion of 
the principles of electro-magnetism. Discussion of the principles 
of electro-magnetic action and their application in various forms 
of measuring instruments, and the development of laboratory 
methods of measuring the several electrical quantities. Text- 
book, Nichols and Franklin's "Elements of Physics," Vol. II. Pro- 
fessor Shane. 



DIVISIOK OP ENGINEEEINO 227 

Course VII. — Theory of Alternating Currents. — Two lectures 
per week, second semester. Physics VI. and Mathematics X. 
required. 

Discussion of the theory of alternating currents, study of 
circuits containing self-induction, mutual induction and capacity. 

Course VIII. — Theory of Electrical Measurements. — Two lec- 
tures per week, first semester. Physics VII. required. Professor 
Spinney. 

Course X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Lectures and reci- 
tations three hours per week, second semester. Physics VI. is a 
prerequisite of this course. 

General theory of the direct-current dynamo, the establish- 
ment of electro-motive forces by induction, the magnetic circuit, 
armature winding, etc. A study of "characteristic curves" and 
the adaption of the different types of direct-current machinery 
to various commercial purposes is included. 

As a text and reference book S. P. Thompson's "Dynamo 
Electric Machinery" is used. Professor Shane. 

Course Xa. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Two hours per 
week, second semester, Junior year. For students in Mechanical 
Engineering. Physics VI. is a prerequisite of this course, and 
this course is a prerequisite of Course XXXII. 

Sheldon's "Dynamo Electric Machinery" is used as a text- 
book. Professor Shane. 

Course XIII. — Telephony. — Lectures and recitations, two 
hours per week, second semester. A general study of the prin- 
ciples of telephony, the telephone, telephone lines, cables and 
commercial apparatus. Physics VIII. required. Professor Pish. 

Course XIV. — General Physical Laboratory. — Two afternoons 
per week. First semester, or 

Course XlVa. — One afternoon per week, first semester. 

Measurements of length, mass and time, determination of 
Physical constants, use of the barometer, thermometry, calori- 
metry, etc. Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XlVb. — One afternoon per week. Second semester. 
Continuation of Course XlVa. 

Course XV. — Physical Laboratory, Elementary Electrical 
Measurements. — One afternoon per week, second semester, or 

Course XVI. — Two afternoons per week, first semester, or 

Course XVII. — Two afternoons per week, second semester. 
The measurement of the electro-motive force and internal resist- 



228 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ance of primary and secondary batteries, the use of Wheatstone's 
bridge, measurement of current, determination of galvanometer 
constants, high resistance measurements, insulation tests, etc. 
Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XVI II. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Testing. — 
Two afternoons per week, first semester, or 

Course XIX. — Two afternoons per week, second semester. 
Calibration of instruments, absolute measurements, etc. Professor 
Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XX. — Physical Laboratory, Dynamo, Motor and Com- 
mercial Plant Testing. — Two afternoons per week, first semester. 

The efficiencies of dynamos and motors, experimental deter- 
mination of characteristic curves, magnetic leakage, etc. Critical 
study of commercial plants, determination of efficiencies, etc. 
Professor Shane. 

Course XXa. — Physical Laboratory. — Study of alternating 
currents. One afternoon per week, first semester. Laboratory 
methods for measuring inductance, capacity, etc., and 

Course XXI. — Physical Laboratory. — Study of alternating 
currents. Two afternoons per week, second semester, Senior 
year. 

Continuation of Course XXa. The study of alternating cur- 
rent dynamos and motors and commercial transformers. Pro- 
fessor Spinney and Professor Shane. 

Course XXII. — Electric Circuits. — Two hours per week, first 
semester. Physics VI. required. 

A study of the most economical size of conductors for the 
transmission and distribution of electrical energy, taking into 
account current prices of material, rates of interest and deprecia- 
tion, and cost of power. Abbott's "Electrical Transmission of 
Energy" is used as a text and numerous original problems will 
be given. Professor Fish. 

Course XXIV. — Electrical Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week, first semester, Senior year. The design of dynamos, mo- 
tors, transformers, etc. Professor Fish. 

Course XXV. — Electrical Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week, second semester, Senior year. Continuation of Course 
XXIV. Professor Fish. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis begun, and 

Course XXVII. — Thesis finished. Total equivalent of four 
hours per week of one semester. 



DIVISION" OF ENGINEERING 229 

Each student in the course of Electrical Engineering is re- 
quired to prepare a thesis in the Senior year representing, in 
the work done upon it, the equivalent of at least four hours 
per week of one semester. 

This thesis may be of the nature of the design and construc- 
tion of some electrical machine or measuring instrument, the 
efficiency test and critical study of some dynamo-electro machine 
or power plant, or of electrical research work of special direction. 
Professor Spinney. 

Course XXIX. — Electrical Seminar. — One hour per week, first 
semester, and 

Course XXX. — Electrical Seminar. — One hour per week, 
second semester. A continuation of Course XXIX. 

This course consists of the preparation, presentation and 
discussion of papers upon special assigned topics in electrical 
engineering. 

It is required that the papers presented shall be carefully 
written out and submitted for critical reading to the professor 
in charge. Journal reading is made part of this course. Pro- 
fessor Spinney. 

Course XXXI. — Electric Railways and Power Transmission. — 

An elementary study of the application of the principles of elec- 
tro-magnetism to the transmission and distribution of power for 
industrial purposes, including power plants, transmission lines 
and electric motors. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work, three hours per 
week, first semester. Physics III., TV., and Mathematics IX. re- 
quired. Professor Shane. 

Course XXXII. — Electrical Machinery. — A discussion of the 
construction and operation of electrical machinery and its ap- 
plication to electric lighting and power distribution. Two hours 
per week, second semester. Professor Shane. 

Course XXXIII. — Alternating Current Machinery. — Two hours 
per week, first semester. Physics VII. and X., and simultaneous 
work in Course VIII. required. Study of alternating current gen- 
erators, motors, transformers, etc. Professor Fish. 

Course XXXIV.— Alternating Current Machinery. — Two hours 
per week, second semester. Continuation of Course XXXIII. Pro- 
fessor Fish. 



230 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Course XXXV. — Electric Light and Power Installations. — Two 
hours per week, second semester. Course XXXIII required. Pro- 
fessor Fish. 

For laboratory courses of two afternoons per week a fee of 
$5.00 is charged. For courses of one afternoon per week the fee 
is $3.00. 

ELICTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

♦Academic Course. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 4 
Civics, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Civics, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 
History, 2 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 



(Mathematics, II. or III.) 

(English, II.) 

(History, XVI.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 



THIRD SEMESTER. 



Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 
English Literature, 5 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 
Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, V and Via.) 

(Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 
French,, 5, or 



(Mathematics, IV.) 
(Languages, III.) 



*S'tudents who at entrance present satisfactory credits for part of 
the Academic work, or who by examination pass part of it satisfac- 
torily, will be classified in the remaining work to the best advantage. 
Frequently such students can take 10 hours of Mathematics in prepar- 
ing for the Freshman work. 

Opportunity will be offered during the four weeks winter vaca- 
tions whereby students somewhat deficient in Mathematics, English 
or Modern Language can make up some work in these line© under 
private tutors. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 231 

German, 5 (Languages, VII.) 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 (English, in.) 

History, English History, 1 (History, XVII.) 
Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX., XXX. or XXXI.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, I.) 

Library Work, 4 hours (Library, I.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 5 (Mathematics, VI.) 
French, 5, or (Languages, IV.) 

German, 5 (Languages, VIII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, IV.) 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 (History, XVTII.) 

Descriptive Geometry, 4 (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

Machine Sketching, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop-Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX., XXX. or XXXII.) 
Military Drill, 2 (Military, II.) 

Sophomore Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Analytical Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, VEIL) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 
Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, V.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, III.) 

SECOND SEMESTEB. 

Calculus, 5 (Mathematics, IX.) 

Physics, 5 (Physics, IV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, VI.) 
Shop Work, (Mechanical Engineering, XXX, XXXI, or XXXII.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIII.) 

Composition, 1 (English, VI.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, IV.) 



232 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Junior Year. 



FIKST SEMESTEE. 



Differential Equations, 3 
Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Electricity and Magnetism, 3 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Political Economy, 5 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 



(Mathematics, X.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

(Physics, VI.) 

(Physics, XIV.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 



Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXXIII.) 

*Debating, 1 (English, VII.) 

**History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 



Dynamo Electric Machinery, 3 
Theory of Alternating Currents, 2 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Steam Engine, 3 
Materials of Construction, 3 
Physical Laboratory, 2 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Shop Work, 2 
♦Debating, 1 
**History, XlXth Century, 



(Electrical Engineering, X.) 
(Physics, VII.) 



(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Physics, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXXTV.) 

(English VEIL) 

(History, VTII.) 



Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Theory of Electrical Measurements, 2 Physics, VTII.) 

Alternating Current Machinery, 2 

(Electrical Engineering XXXIII.) 
(Mechanical Engineering, VI.) 
(Mechanical Engineering, VH.) 
(Physics, XX. and XXa.) 
(Electrical Engineering, XXTV.) 
(Electrical Engineering, XXII.) 
1 (Engineering, II.) 



Hydraulics, 4 
Steam Engine Design, 3 
Physical Laboratory, 3 
Electrical Design, 2 
Electric Circuits, 2 
Specifications and Contracts, 



♦Elective. 

♦♦Elective in either Semester of Junior or Senior year, subject to 
the approval of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 233 

History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VII.) 

Seminar, 1 (Electrical Engineering, XXIX.) 

Thesis, 1 (Electrical Engineering, XXVI.) 

SECOND 



History of Engineering, 1 (Engineering, I.) 

Alternating Current Machinery, 2 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXIV.) 
Electric Light and Power Installations, 2 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXV.) 
Constructive Engineering, 3 (Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

Physical Laboratory, 2 (Physics, XXI.) 

Electrical Design, 2 (Electrical Engineering, XXV.) 

Telephony, 2 (Electrical Engineering, XHI.) 

♦History, XlXth Century, 2 (History, VHI.) 

Seminar, 1 (Electrical Engineering, XXX.) 

Thesis, 3 (Electrical Engineering, XXVII.) 

DEPARTMENT OF MINING ENGINEERING. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, PROFESSOR. 
E. E. BUGBEE AND I. A. WILLIAMS, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

The courses in Mining Engineering are planned to give the 
student a ready familiarity with the branches which form the 
ground work of the science of Mining and Metallurgy. The 
Department of Mining Engineering aims to give him such a 
thorough training in the fundamentals as will enable him after 
graduation to acquire in a comparatively short time the practical 
experience absolutely necessary before he is fitted to assume 
positions of great responsibility in the mining industries. The 
department offers two courses: A four years'; and a two years,. 
The first is intended for those students who desire a "thorough 
course in Theoretical and Practical Mining," and underlying 
sciences, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Min- 
ing Engineering. The requirements for admission are the same 
as those for admission to other Engineering courses. Students 
who pursue this course to completion are expected to be able to 
undertake the "full management of mining in its various 
branches," at least as practiced in Iowa, and become familiar 



♦Elective in either Semester of Junior or Senior year, subject to the 
approval of Professor of Electrical Engineering. 



234 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

with the principles involved and the methods employed in good 
mining engineering practice in general. 

The latter course is designed for young men who have had 
some practical experience in mines, and wish to study mine 
surveying, drafting, the problems of ventilation, drainage, haul- 
age, mine operating, etc., and also to learn something of the 
sciences which bear upon their work but have neither the time 
nor the preparation for a full college course. Elementary mathe- 
matics, drawing and shop work receive considerable attention 
during the first year, while the professional studies are reserved 
for the second year. Candidates who are twenty-one years of 
age or over are admitted without examination. All others must 
give evidence of a thorough grounding in the common branches. 

Equipment. 

The Department of Mining Engineering occupies six rooms 
on the third floor and one on the first floor of Engineering Hall 
and shares in common with the other Engineering departments 
the blue print, photographic, Engineering Museum and Assembly 
rooms. Of the rooms used exclusively by the Department of 
Mining Engineering, one is used for laboratory purposes only, 
two for laboratory and lecture purposes, one as a museum, and 
three afford space for supplies, instruments, books and filing 
cases, in addition to their use for office purposes. 

Lecture Room and Laboratory in Mining Engineering. — This 
room is provided with seventy-five opera chairs with folding arm 
rests, a wall table cabinet occupying all of the outside wall space 
and so arranged as to provide excellent working space in front of 
the windows while the space between the windows is utilized for 
the filing of study material. Above the wall table, lockers with 
glass doors are provided, in which students may keep books and 
small pieces of apparatus free from dust. The windows are all 
provided with opaque shades and the room with a permanent 
lantern screen. The balance of the interior wall space is occu- 
pied by slate blackboards. A large cabinet lecture table com- 
pletes the equipment of the room. 

Seminar Room. — The seminar room is used for both lab- 
oratory and lecture purposes as in the case of the preceding, in 
addition to serving as a conference room and headquarters for 
the Junior and Senior students in Mining Engineering. It is 
equipped with two long tables standing at right angles to and 



DIVISION OP ENGINEERING 235 

directly connected with a large cabinet lecture table, the whole 
forming a continuous table in the form of a U. The room has a 
seating capacity of thirty-six and is equipped with movable re- 
volving chairs, and slate blackboards on the interior walls. In 
addition the room contains a twenty-two tray filing case for 
large drawings, plats and maps, and a supply case. 

Metallurgical Laboratory. — The laboratory for Metallurgy 
and Ceramics is located on the ground floor and is fitted with 
soapstone topped cabinet wall tables occupying all the outside 
walls and a large fume chamber, supply and display cases. It 
is supplied with water, gas, compressed air, exhaust and elec- 
trical connections. It already contains a Hoskin's No. 4 muffle 
furnace and a Bosworth assay furnace with the usual accessories 
for doing metallurgical and ceramic work. 

The Museum. — The museum for Geology and Mining Engi- 
neering is fitted with eight museum cases with sloping glass 
tops and cabinet bases. The bases supply room for one hundred 
and ninety-two trays in which the working collections and dupli- 
cate material in Geology and Mineralogy are filed. One large 
central case containing the larger casts of the "Ward Series," a 
series of cases, showcase tops and cabinet bases, occupy the 
space between the windows, and permanent cases occupy all of 
the partition wall space. 

The offices supply room for apparatus, supplies, books, and 
filing cases. 

The department is supplied with a Sullivan core drill with a 
complete set of tools and accessories for carrying on actual field 
operations, a "Queen" Light Mountain mining transit; two "Ber- 
ger" No. 4 Mining transits with interchangeable side and top 
telescopes; a Br,unton transit; a sensitive six-dial anemometer 
reading to ten millions of feet and adapted for the measurement 
of currents of .air through mines and tunnels — an instrument 
absolutely necessary in order to deal intelligently with the prob- 
lems of mine ventilation; rods and sighting poles; a set of 
miner's tools; a barometer, clinometer, a series of miner's lamps 
and various instruments used in ascertaining distances. 

During the past year the department has received through 
the generosity of the J. George Leyner Engineering Works of 
Denver, Colorado, one Water Leyner Rock Drill, with column 
condenser, and full complement of steel. 



236 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The laboratory in Metallurgy and Ceramics, aside from the 
list of utensils to be found in any well equipped laboratory for 
that branch of chemical work, is supplied with the following 
special pieces of apparatus: Weatherhead mortar and porcelain 
mortars for pulverizing; a set of brass brickette molds, chemical 
balance; torsion balance; one Hoskin's No. 4 muffle furnace; one 
Bosworth assay furnace; Le Chatelier thermo-electric pyrometer; 
and a Seger volumeter. 

The proximity of Ames to the Iowa coal fields affords easy 
access to the coal mines of Boone and Polk counties. The great 
centers of the clay industry, Des Moines. Boone, and Fort Dodge 
are equally accessible, while the quarries of Marshall county are 
scarcely more than an hour's ride from the College. These and 
numerous allied industries are, after all, the most important and 
indispensable laboratories for the practical mining engineer. 
The department undertakes to present the accepted theories con- 
cerning mineral aggregation, origin and occurrence but these 
theories can be put to test only by an intelligent use of the 
drill, the level and the plane table. The accredited methods of 
winning the ores and minerals receive full discussion in the class 
room, but only render obvious the necessity of becoming familiar 
with the practical workings of the sluice box, the tipple and the 
stamp mill. The chemical and physical properties of a clay may 
be ascertained in the laboratory, but a complete knowledge of 
its properties and its mode of treatment can be gained only by 
following it from the pit to the street. In short, the department 
aims to give as complete an exposition of the theories and laws 
which underlie the science of mining as time will permit, but the 
verification and application of these theories and laws must be 
made, in large measure, in the field and in the industries. 

It is the settled policy of the department to carry on such 
investigation work as may be of benefit to the mining and manu- 
facturing interests of the state. In cooperation with the other 
Engineering departments considerable work has been done and 
is being done on fuels, clays and structural materials. The 
department is also prepared to do a limited amount of assaying, 
test clays and fuels, do mine surveying, prepare mine maps and 
plats, examine and report on mine and clay properties for citizens 
of the state at reasonable cost. In fact the atmosphere produced 
by practical investigation work is believed to be necessary to 



DIVISION OP ENGINEERING 237 

the healthful growth of the engineer, and no opportunity is lost 
to encourage work along these lines. 

Courses in Mining. 

The work of the first two years in the four years' course in 
Mining Engineering is exactly the same as that required in the 
course in Mechanical Engineering, with the exception that Sur- 
veying takes the place of Mechanical Drawing, and the addition 
of Principles of Mining in the second semester (Freshman.) The 
professional studies are given due prominence during the last 
two years of the course and the student is required to take con- 
tinuous work in mining, chemistry and metallurgy, and geology, 
through the last three terms. He is expected to make one of 
these branches the subject of special investigation and to embody 
the results of such investigation in a thesis, which is required 
of every student who is a candidate for graduation. 

It is generally recognized that there is of necessity a con- 
siderable gap between the work included in the College curricu- 
lum and that of the professional engineer; and that the student 
in Engineering must gain the larger part of his professional 
training outside of college walls. The courses in summer field 
work are offered in the hope that his apprenticeship may be 
reduced to a minimum, and are required of all students in the 
four years' course in Mining Engineering. 

Course I. — Principles of Mining. — Two hours per week, sec- 
ond semester, Freshman year. The student receives instruction 
in the general and elementary principles of mining in order that 
he may appreciate something of what he sees and hears before 
he makes a detailed study of Prospecting, Exploitation, Mining 
Methods, and the various subjects included in Courses II., III. and 
IV. Special attention is given to mining terms and local mining 
methods. 

Course II. — The Principles of Mining. — Second semester, 
Junior year, and counts three hours per week. The first ten 
weeks of the term are devoted to a consideration of the methods 
employed in excavating, boring and shaft-sinking, and in mining 
and the support of mine excavations, while the remainder of the 
term is given up to a critical study of methods employed in 
exploration, development and mine working in general. 

Course III. — Continuation of Course II. — Three hours per 
week and runs through the first semester, Senior year. The work 



238 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

embraces a thorough discussion of the principles involved in coal 
mining in general and is followed by a careful consideration of 
those principles which are applicable to the Iowa coal fields in 
particular. Mine ventilation, drainage and lighting receive due 
attention. 

Course IV. — Mining Engineering. — Second semester, Senior 
year, and counts four hours per week. Mine plant, administra- 
tion and mine accounts receive special attention. The semester's 
work involves a critical study of mining machinery, with especial 
reference to the types best adapted to meet the requirements of 
the various conditions in actual practice. Also mine buildings 
and the general equipment and administration of a mine plant 
are considered. About one-half of the semester will be devoted to 
ore dressing. 

Course V. — Mining Law. — One hour per week, second semes- 
ter of Senior year. An outline of the most important laws affect- 
ing the mineral industry is presented to the men as they are 
completing their work in the department. While the laws on the 
statute books at the present time are for the greater part local 
and while an exhaustive study of them in the time available is out 
of the question, the necessity of some knowledge of the law is 
impressed upon the student and he is shown where he can obtain 
information on the simpler questions. 

Course VI. — Seminar. — Required of the students in Mining 
Engineering, first semester, Junior year, and counts one hour. 

Course VII. — Seminar. — Continues the work of Course VI 
Counts one hour, second semester, Junior year. 

Course VIM. — Seminar. — A continuation of Course VII. and 
counts one hour, first semester, Senior year. 

Course IX. — Seminar. — Continues the work of the three se- 
mesters preceding and counts one hour, second semester, Senior 
year. Courses VI. to IX., inclusive, are for the purpose of bring- 
ing together the students of the Junior and Senior years and 
members of the instructing corps for weekly conferences. Such 
conferences afford occasion for the discussion of timely topics 
in which the student members take part freely. 

Course X. — Mine Surveying. — Two hours per week first se- 
mester, Junior year. During the Sophomore year the mining 
student takes the regular course in Surveying offered by the 
Department of Civil Engineering. Mine Surveying supplements 
the work of the Sophomore year and presents various methods of 



DIVISION OP ENGINEEEING 239 

surveying especially adapted to mines and tunnels. Part of the 
time is given to practical work with top and side telescope and 
the various calculations which its use requires. 

Course XI. — Thesis. — Required of all candidates for gradua- 
tion in the course of Mining Engineering and counts one hour 
during the first semester, Senior year, and three hours during the 
second semester. 

Course XII. — Summer Field Work in Mine Surveying. — The 

work is carried on in one of the coal mining districts of the 
state and comprises the complete survey of a mine and a thor- 
ough examination of the equipment and mode of operation of 
a typical mine for the district, and leads in the first place to a 
mine map, and in the second to a careful report on mine property, 
accompanied by the necessary illustrations. The time required 
is two full weeks. Open to students who have completed the 
Freshman or Sophomore years. 

Course XIII. — Summer Field Work in the Study of Mine 
Operation and Equipment, and of Concentrating Plants. — This 
course necessitates a visit to one of the great metal producing 
centers outside of the state. A careful study of mine properties 
is made, and a detailed report, properly illustrated by sketches 
and drawings, is required. A portion of the time is devoted to 
a study of ore dressing and concentrating plants. The time 
required is four weeks, and the course is open to students who 
have completed the Junior or Senior years. 

Course XIV. — Metallurgy. — Three hours per week, second 
semester, Junior year. The semester's work comprises a study 
of refractory materials, fluxes, fuels and furnaces and the metal- 
lurgy of iron and steel. Especial attention is given to pyrometry, 
calorimetry, fire clays and coke. The various metallurgical fur- 
naces are studied from working drawings. At the close of the 
semester a few weeks are devoted to the science of metallo- 
graphy. 

Course XV. — Metallurgy Continued. — Five hours per week, 
first semester, Senior year. Instruction in this course is confined 
to the processes relating to copper, lead, silver, gold and zinc. In 
the time allotted to the work, a study of the metallurgy of all 
the metals could not be made satisfactorily, and it is deemed best 
to confine the work to the most important metals and the most 
important processes. The principles of ore dressing and prepara- 



240 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

tion for metallurgical treatment is given in the second semester, 
Senior year, in Course IV. 

Course XVI. — Ceramics. — The work of the semester is de- 
voted to a consideration of the origin, composition, properties and 
distribution of the crude materials used in the clay and cement 
industries. The physical properties of clays are studied and 
mechanical analyses are made in the laboratory, paralleling the 
class-room work. 

Course XVII. — Ceramics. — This course includes a discussion 
of the principles involved in the manufacture of clay goods. 
Methods of selecting and winning the raw materials, their pre- 
paration, standard processes of manufacture, burning and clay 
testing are treated as fully as the time will permit. 

Course XVIII. — Ventilation and Haulage. — Five hours per 
week, first semester, second year in the two years' course in 
Mining. The work of the semester is devoted to a careful con- 
sideration of the problems affecting the distribution of air in 
mines and mine drainage. Some attention is given to the discus- 
sion of standard methods of hoisting and haulage in mines. 

Course XIX. — Mine Exploration and Operation. — Five hours 
per week during the last semester in the two years' course in 
Mining. Exploration, shafting, timbering, and methods of mine 
operation, especially as adapted to the Iowa coal fields are the 
principal topics treated. Mine accounts and administration re- 
ceive such attention as their importance and the time will permit. 

Course XX. — Mining Arithmetic. — Five hours per week, first 
semester of first year in the two years' course in Mining. The 
fundamental operations in arithmetic are reviewed rapidly during 
the first half of the semester, while measurements, square and 
cube root and practical problems relating to mining are made 
duly prominent during the last half of the semester. 

Course XXI. — Field Work in Mine Surveying. — First semes- 
ter, first year in the two years' course in Mining Engineering. 
The first year men serve as apprentices in the work of mine 
surveying, acting in the capacity of rodmen and chainmen to the 
parties conducted by higher classmen. 

Course XXII. — A Continuation of Course XXI. — During the 
first half of the semester on account of the usual inclemency of 
the weather, one-half day per week is devoted to a study of mine 
plats and maps. 

Course XXIII. — Field Work in Mining. — First semester, sec- 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 241 

ond year, and required of students in the two years' course in 
Mining. 

Course XXIV. — Continues the Work of Course XXIII. — Spe- 
cial attention is directed to mine operation and equipment. 

Courses in Geology Required of Students in Various Engineering 

Courses. 

Course I. — Physiography. — First semester, Freshman year, 
three hours per week; serves as an introduction to the science of 
Geology. The first half of the semester is devoted to the study of 
the agents which have to do with modifying the earth's crust, 
while the resultant earth features receive careful consideration 
during the second half of the semester. Davis' or Tarr's "Ele- 
ments of Physical Geography" is the text-book used. Required in 
the Division of Science, in the courses of Agronomy and Horti- 
culture in the Division of Agriculture and the two years' courses 
in Mining Engineering and Clay Working. 

Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week first half 
of Junior year. This course embraces a discussion of the prin- 
ciples which form the ground work of the science. The first ten 
weeks are devoted to dynamic and structural geology and the last 
six weeks to stratigraphic and historical geology. The student 
is required to make several excursions to points of geological 
interest to verify the more salient facts discussed in the class 
room. Prerequisites: Physics III. and IV., and Chemistry m. 
and IV. 

Course III. — Engineering Geology. — The semester is devoted 
to a discussion of the fundamental principles of dynamical and 
structural geology, and study of the common minerals and 
rocks, especially those important in structural materials. The 
course is given in the second semester and counts four hours per 
week. Prerequisites the same as for Course II. 

Course IV. — Geology, Advanced. — Five hours per week second 
semester of Senior year. The nature, mode of occurrence and 
origin of the minerals and rocks which constitute the earth's 
crust, are considered in some detail in the first half of the semes- 
ter, while rock alteration as involved in metamorphism and 
weathering receives special attention during the second half. 
Excursions are continued as in Course II, and students are en- 
couraged to familiarize themselves with the methods employed 

16 



242 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



in doing research work and to make independent observations. 
Prerequisite: Geology II. or III. 

Course VI. — Mineralogy. — Two hours class room and one 
hour laboratory per week, second half of Junior year. This 
course is intended to give the student a clear idea of the mor- 
phological and physical properties of crystalline substances. Pre- 
requisites: Physics III. and IV., Chemistry III. and IV., and 
Mathematics VI. 

Course VII.— Mineralogy, Descriptive and Determinative. — 
Two hours class-room work and one hour laboratory per week, 
first semester, Senior year. This work is devoted to the study of 
the more important mineral species, their properties, uses, dis- 
tribution and methods of determination. Prerequisites: Geology 
VI. 

MINING ENGINEERING. 

*Academic Course. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 
English, 5 
History, 4 
**Civics, 2 



(Mathematics, I.) 

(English, I.) 

(History, XV.) 

(Civics, I.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 
History, 2 



(Mathematics, II. or III.) 

(English, n.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(History, XVI.) 



THIRD SEMESTER. 



Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 



(Mathematics, V. and Via.) 



*S!tudents who at entrance present satisfactory credits for part 
of the Academic work, or who by examination pass part of it satis- 
factorily, will be classified in the remaining studies to the best ad- 
vantage. Frequently such students can take 10 hours of Mathema- 
tics in preparing for the Freshman work. 

Opportunity will be offered during the four weeks winter vaca- 
tions whereby students somewhat deficient in Mathematics, English 
or Modern Language can make up some work in these lines under 
private tutors. 

**Elective, 'but students are urged to take this technical work. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



243 



English Literature, 5 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 
**Drawing, 2 



( Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



Freshman Year. 



Advanced Algebra, 
French, 5, or 
German, 5 

Advanced Rhetoric, I 
English History, 1 
Shop Work, 2 
Mechanical Drawing, 
Lettering, 1 
Military Drill, 2 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

i (Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(English, III.) 

(History, XVII.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIX. or XXX.) 

2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

(Civil Engineering, I.) 

(Military, I.) 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Languages, VIII.) 

(English, IV.) 

(History, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry, 

French, 5, or 

German, 5 

Composition, 1 

History, Formation of the Union, 1 

Descriptive Geometry, 4 (Civil Engineering, IV.) 

Machine Sketching, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX. or XXX.) 

Military Drill, 2 (Military, II.) 

Principles of Mining, 2 (Mining Engineering, I.) 

*Summer Field Work, Two Weeks (Mining Engineering, XII.) 

Sophomore Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Analytical Geometry, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Physics, 5 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Physics, III.) 



*Students who secure instructive employment during their summer 
vacations between Freshman-Sophomore and Sophomore-Junior years 
will be excused from summer field work providing they are so em- 
ployed for at least one month subject to the approval of the head 
of the department. 

"""Elective, but students are urged to take this technical work. 



244 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Chemistry, 5 
Drawing, 2 
Composition, 1 
Military Drill, 2 



Calculus, 5 
Surveying, 4 
Physics, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Composition, 1 
Drawing, 2 
Military Drill, 2 



(Chemistry, III.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

(English, V.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



* Summer Field Work, 2 Weeks 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Civil Engineering, IX.) 

(Physics, IV.) 

(Chemistry, VI.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XXIII.) 

(Military, IV.) 

(Mining Engineering, XII.) 



Junior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 (Mechanical Engineering, I.) 

Electric Railways and Power Transmission, 3 

(Electrical Engineering, XXXI.) 



Geology, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Mine Surveying, 2 
****History, XlXth Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 
**Debating, 1 



(Geology, II.) 

(Chemistry, VII. and VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, X.) 

(History, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VI.) 

(English, VII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Analytical Mechanics, 4 
Steam Engine, 3 
Mineralogy, 3 
Mining, 3 
Chemistry, 3 



(Mechanical Engineering, II.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IV.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Mining Engineering, II.) 

(Chemistry, XII.) 



♦Students who secure instructive employment during their summer 
vacations between Freshman-Sophomore and Sophomore-Junior years 
will be excused from summer field work providing they are so em- 
ployed for at least one month subject to the approval of the head 
of the department. 

**Elective, subject to the approval of the Professor of Mining 
Engineering. 

****Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the 
approval of the head of the Mining Engineering Department. 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 



245 



Metallurgy, 3 

"History, XlXth Century, 2 

Seminar, 1 

**Debating, 1 



(Mining Engineering, XIV.) 
(History, VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VII.) 
(English, Vni.) 



***Summer Field Work, Four Weeks (Mining Engineering, XIII.) 
Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Railway Engineering, 5 
Mineralogy, 3 
Metallurgy, 5 
Mining, 3 
Chemistry, 2 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 
Specifications and Contracts, 
♦History, XlXth Century, 2 
Seminar, 1 



(Civil Engineering, X.) 

(Geology, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, XV.) 

(Mining Engineering, HI.) 

(Chemistry, XXX.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

1 (Engineering, II.) 

(History, VII.) 

(Mining Engineering, VIII.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



History of Engineering, 1 

Materials of Construction, 3, or 

Political Economy, 3, or 

Constructing Engineering, 3 

Geology, 5 

Mining, 4 

Engineering Laboratory, 1 

Mining Law, 1 

♦History, XlXth Century, 2 

Seminar, 1 

Thesis, 3 



(Engineering, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, III.) 

(Economic Science.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, IX.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Mining Engineering, IV.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, V.) 

(History, VIII.) 

(Mining Engineering, IX.) 

(Mining Engineering, XI.) 



♦Elective in either term of Junior or Senior year, subject to the 
approval of the head of the Mining Engineering Department. 

** Elective, subject to the approval of the Professor of Mining 
Engineering. 

***Junior students in Mining Engineering who secure instructive 
employment in one of the great metal mining districts of the country 
will be excused from the Junior summer field work providing they 
are so employed for at least six weeks, subject to the approval of 
the head of the department. 



246 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

TWO YEARS' COURSE IN MINING ENGINEERING. 
First Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Mining Arithmetic, 5 (Mining Engineering, XX.) 

Elementary Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

Elementary Physics, 5 (Physics, I.) 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX. or XXX.) 

Field Work in Mine Surveying, One-half Day per Week, 

(Mining Engineering, XXI.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, V.) 

Advanced Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, II.) 

Plane Trigonometry, 5 (Mathematics, VIb.) 

Physical Geography, 3 (Geology, I.) 

Drawing, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX. or XXX.) 

Field Work in Mine Surveying, One-half Day per Week, 

(Mining Engineering, XXII.) 

Second Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 

Mining, 5 (Mining Engineering, XVIII.) 

Mine Surveying, 2 (Mining Engineering, X.) 

Engineering Geology, 4 (Geology III.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, III.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 

Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1 

(Mining Engineering, XXIII.) 
Engineering Laboratory, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XII.) 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Mining, 5 (Mining Engineering, XIX.) 

Steam Engineering, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

Economic Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, VI.) 

Engineering Laboratory, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XIII.) 



DIVISION OF ENGINEERING 247 

Field Work in Mining Engineering, 1 

(Mining Engineering, XXIV.) 

COURSE IN CLAY-WORKING AND CERAMICS. 

The short course in Clay- Working is designed to assist young 
men to a knowledge of the fundamental principles which under- 
lie the science of Ceramics. The course is offered with a view 
of extending the same sort of service to the Ceramic industries 
as the course in Agriculture renders to the Agriculture indus- 
tries, or the course of Mechanical Engineering renders to the 
Mechanical industries. 

TWO YEARS' COURSE IN CERAMICS. 
First Year. 

FIEST SEMESTEE. 

Elementary Mineral Chemistry, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XIII.) 
Elementary Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

Elementary Physics, 3 (Physics, I.) 

Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXI.) 

Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX. or XXX.) 

SECOND SEMESTEE. 

Mineral and Geological Chemistry, 5 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XIV.) 
Plane and Solid Geometry, 5 (Mathematics, V.) 

Physical Geography, 3 (Geology, I.) 

Drawing, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XX.) 

Shop Work, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXIX or XXX.) 

Second Year. 

FIEST SEMESTEE. 

Chemistry of Clays, 5 (Agricultural Chemistry, XV.) 

Ceramics, 5 (Mining Engineering, XVI.) 

Engineering Geology, 4 (Geology, III.) 

Mechanical Drawing, 2 (Mechanical Engineering, XXII.) 



248 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

SECOND SEMESTEE. 

Chemistry of Clays and Glazes, 5 

(Agricultural Chemistry, XVI.) 
Ceramics, 5 (Mining Engineering, XVII.) 

Steam Engineering, 1 (Mechanical Engineering, XVIII.) 

Economic Geology, 5 (Geology, IV.) 

Testing Clay Products, 3 (Civil Engineering, XTV.) 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 



250 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



EXPERIMENT STATION STAFF 



A. B. STORMS, A. M., D. D. 

President. 

A. MARSTON, C. E. 

Director 
Civil Engineering. 

G. W. BISSELL, M. E. 
Mechanical Engineering. 

L. B. SPINNEY, B. M. E„ M. Sc. 

Electrical Engineering. 

S. W. BEYER, B. Sc, Ph. D. 

Mining Engineering. 

W. H. MEEKER, M. E. 
Mechanical Engineering. 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION. 

While the principal business of the several Engineering de- 
partments of the College is perhaps to give instruction to their 
students, the fact is recognized that the state contributes largely 
to the financial support of the College and that in return, not 
only should the College give tuition to the children of Iowa, but 
it should contribute as much as possible to the successful carry- 
ing on of the industrial interests of the state. By the establish- 
ment of experiment stations the national government has recog- 
nized the duty of the land grant colleges to the agricultural inter- 
ests. The Engineering departments of this College believe that 
it is their proper business to aid the other industrial enterprises 
of the state. 

With this thought as the motive, the several Engineering 
departments have undertaken during the past ten years and will 
continue in the future to undertake to carry on investigations of 
interest and value to the industries of Iowa, as need therefor 
may arise, in so far as the funds available will permit. A num- 
ber of pamphlets and bulletins giving the results of some of 
these investigations have already been published, and have been 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 251 

received with much favor by the people of the state. By strong 
resolutions numerous industrial and public organizations in Iowa 
have expressed their approval of this work. 

In recognition and furtherance of this work the last General 
Assembly appropriated a specific sum for the establishment of 
an Engineering Experiment Station, for carrying on and pub- 
lishing bulletins of investigations of value to the industrial and 
municipal interests of Iowa. 

Work of the Engineering Experiment Station. 

One of the most important lines of investigation already 
undertaken is sewage disposal. The first sewage disposal plant 
in Iowa was constructed at the College in 1898 and has been in 
highly successful operation ever since. The authorities of many 
cities in the state have visited it. The College is continually 
carrying on investigations in sewage disposal, both with the large 
plant and with smaller experimental plants. Among the special 
subjects now being investigated may be mentioned those of the 
disposal of creamery sewage, and small plants, built for less 
than $100 each, for disposing of the sewage of private houses. 

In addition a representative of the Engineering Experiment 
Station each year visits all the sewage disposal plants of "the 
state, making tests of the efficiency and securing the data of the 
operation of the plants. Each year the results of these examina- 
tion and of the other investigations are published in the bulletin 
for free distribution. 

Another line of investigation has been tests of building mate- 
rials, which have also been under way for several years. Thou- 
sands of such tests, of all kinds of building materials in Iowa, 
have been made and the results published for the benefit both of 
the manufacturers and the consumers of the state. 

Investigations helpful to the clay interests of the state have 
been under way for some years, and additional equipment is 
being put in for this work. Opportunity is provided whereby 
anyone can send to the Experiment Station samples of clay, to 
be tested as to suitability for material for brick, tile or other 
clay wares. 

The investigations of Iowa coals have been of much value to 
the manufacturers and to the mining interests of the state, as 
has been shown by the large demand for the bulletin already 
published. This work is being continued and largely extended. 



252 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

It is planned to conduct a statistical inquiry of the power 
plants of the state, with personal examination of each plant and 
study its conditions. The results of this investigation will be 
helpful in suggesting improvements in methods and systems in 
Iowa power plants. 

Careful tests of electric lamps have been made a special fea- 
ture of the Engineering Experiment Station work. Any city or 
corporation can now send its lamps to the station (which has 
been made the official testing station of the Iowa Electrical 
Association) and have careful tests of efficiency, candle power 
and durability made at short notice and slight cost, and thus 
determine whether it is getting proper return for the money paid 
for its lamps. Many such lamps are being sent in, and in addi- 
tion special investigations along this line are being conducted, 
the results of which will be published in bulletin form. 

An investigation is now under way of the properties of Iowa 
limes as compared with those from other states. 

A bulletin giving the results of thousands of tests of dif- 
ferent kinds of cement is ready for the press. 

A bulletin on Iowa water works is well along. 

Investigations for a bulletin on sewerage, water, and plumb- 
ing regulations for Iowa cities are also far advanced. 

The above is, only a part of the work done or planned by the 
Engineering Experiment Station. 

TESTS OF MATERIALS. 

More and more the cities and other public bodies of the state, 
together with private corporations, are sending in samples of 
various materials to be tested in the laboratories of the engineer- 
ing experiment station. 

Many places are having their cements tested to see whether 
they are up to specifications. 

The same is true of brick, both for paving and building pur- 
poses. 

Steel, iron, stone, wood and other materials of construction 
can be sent in for test to advantage. 

Users of cement are sending samples of their sands for tests, 
to select the best. 

Many samples of clay are received for analysis, test, and 
report as to value. 

Ores are received for assaying work. 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 253 

Coal can be sent in for test of its calorific value for fuel, 
and the absence of deleterious elements. 

Electric lamps are being sent in by many cities and corpor- 
ations for test to decide Whether they are up to the representa- 
tions on which they were bought. 

All such testing work for the people of Iowa is done at bare 
cost. We invite further work of this kind, and promise our best 
efforts to be of assistance to all residents of the state along 
these and similar lines. 

LIST OF ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETINS 

Bulletin No. 1. — The Iowa State College Sewage Disposal Plant 
and Investigations. (Now out of print). This bulletin 
describes the college plant, the first in the state, and gives 
the results of the first year of operation, including bacterial 
and chemical analyses. 21 pgs., 6 cuts. 

Bulletin No. 2. — Bacteriological Investigations of the Iowa State 
College Sewage. Results from Sept. 1, 1899, to Sept. 1, 1900. 
22 pgs. 

Bulletin No. 3. — Data of Iowa Sewage and Sewage Disposal This 
bulletin gives a number of gagings and analyses of Iowa 
sewage from different towns, and of various kinds, together 
with the detailed results of the operation of the college 
sewage disposal plant from May, 1900, to May, 1901. 27 
pgs., 5 cuts. 

Bulletin No. 4. — Bacteriological Investigations of the Iowa State 
College Sewage Disposal Plant. Results from 1898 to 1902. 
19 pgs., 3 plates. 

Bulletin No. 5. — The Chemical Composition of the Sewage of the 
Iowa State College Sewage Disposal Plant. Results from 
1898 to 1902. 11 pgs. 

Bulletin No. 6. — Tests of Iowa Common Brick. This bulletin 
gives the results of several hundred tests of seven different 
varieties of common brick manufactured in Iowa. Crush- 
ing, transverse breaking, absorption and freezing and thaw- 
ing tests are given in each case. 23 pgs., 28 cuts. 



254 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Bulletin No. 7. — Sewage Disposal in Iowa. This bulletin gives 
detailed descriptions, usually with plans, of all sewage 
disposal plants in Iowa up to December, 1903, with the 
history of sewage disposal in the state, and full details of 
the operation of the several plants, including chemical and 
bacterial tests of efficiency. This paper was awarded the 
Fuertes Medal by Cornell University, June, 1904, and the 
Chanute Medal of the Western Society of Engineers for 
1903. 

Bulletin No. 8. — 'This bulletin gives the results of several hun- 
dred tests of seven varieties of dry press brick commonly 
used in Iowa. Crushing, transverse breaking, absorption 
and freezing and thawing tests are given in each case. 
19 pgs.. 8 cuts. 

Bulletin No. 9. — Notes on Steam Generation with Iowa Coal. This 
bulletin gives a summary of a number of analyses of Iowa 
coal and tests of their heating power together with a dis- 
cussion of the special difficulties encountered in burning 
Iowa coals and the best methods of overcoming these diffi- 
culties. 16 pgs., 3 cuts. 

Bulletin No. 10. — Tests of Different Kinds of Cement. This bul- 
letin gives a summary of the results of several thousand 
tests of many kinds of cement, made in the cement labora- 
tory of the college during a period of several years, and 
also several thousand special tests made by Messrs G. W. 
Miller and D. E. Donovan. (Now ready for press.) 

Any of the above bulletins not out of print can be obtained 
free of charge by writing to 

A. Marston, Director, Ames, Iowa. 



ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 255 

GOOD ROADS INVESTIGATIONS, IOWA STATE HIGHWAY 
COMMISSION. 

A. MARSTON, 
Dean of Division of Engineering. 

C. F. CURTISS, 
Dean of Division of Agriculture. 

t. h. Mcdonald, 

Assistant in charge of Good Roads Investigations. 

By act of the last General Assembly the College was made 
the State Highway Commission of Iowa, and a small appropria- 
tion was made for good roads investigations. It was made the 
duty of the commission to conduct road investigations, to furnish 
expert assistance to the several counties when called on by the 
proper county authorities, to prepare standard plans and speci- 
fications for road work, and to conduct each year a good roads 
school at the College. 

Since July 1, 1904, the Highway Commission has been active- 
ly engaged in the above work. A general study is being made 
of the good roads problem in Iowa, and much information collect- 
ed. In cooperation with the 1905 state census a careful road 
census of the country roads of Iowa, the first by any state, is 
being made. Tests and standard plans of concrete culverts are 
being made. Standard cross sections of roads are under con- 
sideration, as also standard forms for road maps and profiles, and 
for records of the expenditures of road funds. Visits for inves- 
tigation and advice have already been made to quite a number 
of counties, and road maps of these counties prepared. Statis- 
tics of the present expenditures of road funds are being collected. 

A large amount of good roads machinery has been secured 
by donation. An experimental section of road has been built. 

Good Roads School. 

June 12-17, 1905, inclusive, the first session of the Good 
Roads School will be held at the College. All road officers and 
others interested in good roads are strongly urged to be present 
and take part in the work. 

Regular instruction will be given in the points of road con- 
struction of the various types, and demonstrations of the use of 
machinery in such work given. Regular instruction in the use 



256 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

of simple road surveying instruments and the making of road 
plats and profiles will also be given. Experienced men from 
different parts of the state have been engaged to assist in the 
work, and experts from other states will also lecture on different 
phases of the subject. 

It is believed that the work of the Highway Commission can 
be made of very great value to the state. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO INDUSTRIES 



MATHEMATICS. 

PHYSICS. 

CHEMISTRY. 

BOTANY. 

ZOOLOGY. 

GEOLOGY. 

ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

PSYCHOLOGY. 

LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

HISTORY. 

CIVICS. 

MILITARY SCIENCE. 

LIBRARY. 

MUSIC. 



17 



258 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 



ALBERT BOYNTON STORMS, A. M., D. D., LL. D., 

President, Dean of Science and General and Domestic Science. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, M. Sc, LL. D., 

Dean of the Junior College and Professor of Mathematics and Econo- 
mic Science. 

M. STALKER, M. Sc, V. S., 

Lecturer on Veterinary Medicine. 

GEN. JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, 

Professor of Military Science. 

ALFRED ALLEN BENNETT, M. Sc, 

Professor of Chemistry. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, B. Ag., M. S., Ph. D., 

Professor of Botany. 

GEORGE WELTON BISSELL, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

ANSON MARSTON, C. E., 
Dean of the School of Engineering and Professor of Civil Engineering. 

MISS LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, B. A., M. A., 
Professor of French and German. 

LOUIS BEVTER SPINNEY, B. M. E., M. Sc, 
Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER, B. Sc. Ph. D., 

Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, B. Ph., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, B. Sc, 

Professor of Zoology. 

ADRIAN M. NEWENS, B. O., 
Professor of Public Speaking. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, A. M., D. D., 
Professor of History and Psychology. 

JOHN H. McNEIL, v. m. d., 
Dean of Veterinary Science. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 259 

MISS GEORGETTA WITTER, B. L., 

Professor of Domestic Economy. 

RICHARD CORNELIUS BARRETT, M. A., 

Professor of Civics. 

ARTHUR THOMAS ERWIN, M. S. A., 
Associate Professor of Horticulture in charge of Department. 

WARREN H. MEEKER, M. E., 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

MISS MARIA M. ROBERTS, B. L., 

Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

BENJAMIN H. HIBBARD, B. Ag., Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Economic Science. 

LEWIS EUGENE ASHBAUGH, B. S., Ph. B., 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

WALTER A. STUHR, D. V. M., 
Associate Professor of Histology, Pathology and Therapeutics. 

MISS MARIAN H. KILBOURNE, B. L., 

Dean of Women. 

MISS VINA ELETHE CLARK, 

Librarian. 

JOHN PIPER WATSON, 

Physical Director. 

WILBERT EUGENE HARRIMAN, B. Sc, M. D., 

College Physician. 

FRANK JORDAN RESLER, B. Ph., 

Director of Music, Vocalist. 

HERBERT WILLIAM DOW, B. S. in M. E., 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

MISS LOLA ANN PLACEWAY, B. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

MISS ELIZABETH MACLEAN, 
Assistant Professor of English. 

WILBUR M. WILSON, M. M. E., 
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

JOSEPH EDWARD GUTHRIE, M. Sc, 

Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

PAUL SKEELS PEIRCE, Ph. D., 

Assistant Professor of History. 



260 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

WINFRED F. COOVER, A. M., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

FREDERICK R. AHLERS, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Obstetrics. 

LESLIE M. HURT, D. V. M., 

Assistant Professor of Physiology and Sanitary Science. 

MRS. MARY ELIZABETH RESLER, B. Ph., 

Instructor in Instrumental Music. 

ERNEST ALANSON PATTENGILL, B. S., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

ELBERT BARRETT TUTTLE, |B. S., m E. E., 

Instructor in Physios. 

MISS JULIA COLPITTS, M. A., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS HELEN GERTRUDE REED, Ph. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS GRACE ISABEL NORTON, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

FRANK WENNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physics. 

MISS FRANCES MARIETTA, WILLIAMS, 

Instructor in Domestic Art. 

MISS ANNIE W. FLEMING, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS MAE MILLER, B. Sc., 

Instructor in History. 

MARK PERKINS CLEGHORN, B. Sc, m E. E., 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

WARD MURRAY JONES, ,B. C. E., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

CLARENCE ROY McKINNEY, B. Sc, 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

MISS HARRIETTE KELLOGG, A. M., 

Instructor in Botany. 

MISS FLORENCE ANN LUCAS, 
Instructor in French. 

MISS EFFIE ALENE WHITE, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 261 

MISS ROSE ABEL, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS RUTH MORRISON, A. B., 

Instructor in Domestic Economy. 

JOHN F. TRAVIS, A. M., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

MISS BLANCHE ISABEL THOBURN, A. B., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS ELIZABETH MOORE, Ph. M., 

Instructor in English. 

MISS LISLE McCOLLOM, B. A., 

Instructor in German. 

MISS SYBIL LENTNER, B. S„ 

Instructor in Public Speaking. 

MISS WINIFRED TILDEN, B. A., 

Instructor in Physical Culture. 

MISS OLIVE STEVENS, B. L., 

Assistant Librarian. 

MARGARET B. STANTON, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Mathematics. 

ETHYL CESSNA, B. Sc, 

Assistant in History. 

C. E. BARTHOLOMEW, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Zoology. 

ROBERT EARLE BUCHANAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Botany. 

ESTELLE DENNIS FOGEL, B. A., B. Sc, 

Assistant in Botany. 

EFFIE MAE McKIMM, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM ALFRED BEVAN, B. Sc, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

HOWARD SAMUEL FAWCETT, 

'Student Assistant in Botany. 

MISS VIOLA CHAMBERS, 

Student Assistant in Mathematics. 

FLORA BELL PADDOCK, 

Student Assistant in Domestic Science. 

HAROLD MARSHALL HOWARD, 

Student Assistant in English. 



26'2 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE AS RELATED TO THE INDUSTRIES. 

Many of the courses of study taught in this Division form a 
very essential part of those belonging to the other Divisions, so 
that the work required for the various degrees conferred by the 
College authorities is very thoroughly interwoven. 

The object of the work in this Division is very comprehen- 
sively expressed in the act of Congress establishing this and 
similar colleges. The founding of these colleges on a basis of 
scientific learning has proved to be the beginning of an important 
epoch in educational history. The courses of study in this Divi- 
sion are less technical than are many of those of the other Divi- 
sions. The real advances in modern civilization have been along 
the lines of science study and investigations. It is the intent 
therefore to lay a broad foundation in scientific facts and princi- 
ples in order to fit the graduate to fill his place in the affairs of 
the world. " There can be no better preparation for the duties of 
life and for citizenship than the knowledge and mental training 
given by a genuine study of the sciences. 

During the first two years the lines of study are well marked 
out and but little choice of subjects is given. The required 
mathematics end with the Freshman year. The subject may be 
pursued, however, during the remainder of the course, provided 
the student desires and is qualified to do so. 

The various branches of the study of the English language 
extending throughout the Freshman and Sophomore years are 
sufficient in scope and purpose to give the needed training in the 
use of English. The modern languages, namely, French and 
German, are great store-houses of the sciences, and consequently 
courses of study in these languages are offered to the student in 
the earlier years of his work to enable him to use these languages 
in the last two years of his study. The study of the sciences is 
strongly supported by work in literary, historical and psycholo- 
gical lines. 

The course in Science leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science (B. S.). 

The course in General and Domestic Science leads to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science (B. S.). 

The course in Domestic Science leads to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Domestic Science (B. D. S.). 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



263 



For applicants for admission to the academic year of the 
science courses who are not fully prepared to take up the work 

therein outlined, the College offers the following preparatory 
course: 

Algebra, 5 (Mathematics, I.) 

English, 5 (English, I.) 

History, 5 (History, I.) 

Elementary Botany, 2 (Botany, I.) 

Civics, 2 (Civics, I.) 

SCIENCE. 

(For Men and Women). 

Academic Year. 



FIRST SEMESTEE. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 or 
♦German, 5 
Elementary Speech, 2 
Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(English, II.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND SEMESTEE. 

Plane Geometry, 5 

English, 5 or 

German, 5 

History, Advanced American History, 4 

Freshman Year. 



(Mathematics, V.) 

(Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, II.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Advanced Algebra, 5 
Botany, Ecology, 2 
**German, 5 or 
French, 5 
Physiography, 3 
Advanced Rhetoric, 5 
**Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 
Military Drill, 2 (for men) 
Library Work, 4 hours 
Physical Culture, 1 (for women) 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(Languages, V or VI.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Geology, I.) 

(English, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Military, I.) 

(Library, I.) 



*Beginning German may be taken only by those students who can 
show satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the English of the Acad- 
emic year. 

"♦Elective. 



264 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Solid Geometry and Plane Geometry, 5 

**German, 5 or 

French, 5 

Histology, 4 

Entomology, 2 

Voice and Gesture, 1 

Composition, 1 

Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 

Military Drill, 2 (for men) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women) 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, VT or VII.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Zoology, I.) 

(Public Speaking, II.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, IV.) 

(Military, II.) 



Sophomore Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



** Analytical Geometry, 5 

**Cryptogamic Botany, 5 

** Vertebrate Zoology, 5 

German, 4 or 

French, 4 

Physics, 5 

Composition, 1 

Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 

Military Science, 2 (for men) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women) 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Botany, IV.) 

(Zoology, n.) 

(Languages, VIII or IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(English, V.) 

(Domestic Economy, VI.) 

(Military, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



***Calculus, 5 or 
***Invertebrate Zoology, 5 
Chemistry, 5 
Physics, 5 
Composition, 1 

*Domestic Art, 2 (for women) 
Military Drill, 2 (for men) 
Physical Culture, 1 (for women) 



(Mathematics, IX. > 

(Zoology, III.) 

(Chemistry, II.) 

(Physics, n.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Domestic Economy, VII.) 

(Military, IV.) 



*Elective, if preceded toy r>. E. I. 

**The student shall elect two of these studies. The study omitted 
may he elected in the Junior or Senior year and counted in those years. 

***Choice between Calculus and Invertebrate Zoology. The study 
omitted may be taken in the Junior or Senior year and counted in 
those years. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 

*Junior Year. 



265 



FIEST SEMESTER. 



Analytical Geometry, 5 
Differential Equations, 3 
Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, 3 
Vegetable Cytology, 3 
Chemistry, 5 
Political Economy, 5 
Advanced Interpretation, 2 
Economic Botany, 2 
Debating, 1 
Histology, 2 
English Drama, 3 
The Drama in Translation, 2 
Domestic Science, 2 
Entomology, 5 
***Photography, 2 
Embryology, 3 to 5 
Surveying, 4 
Physiology, 1 



(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Mathematics, X.) 

(Botany, VI.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Chemistry, V.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(English, VII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XXXIII.) 

(Literature, I.) 

(Literature, VIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, II.) 

(Zoology, IV.) 

(Physics, IX.) 

(Zoology^ V.) 

(Civil Engineering, VIII.) 

(Veterinary Science, XVII.) 



History, Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries, 3 

(History, V.) 
History, The Renaissance, 2 (History, X.) 

Geology, 5 (Geology, II.) 

Human Physiology, 5 (Zoology, XII.) 

Military Science, 1 (for men) (Military, V.) 

Band Work, 1 (for men) 
Physical Culture, 1 (for women). Required. 



*At the beginning of the Junior year students in this course must 
select a particular science — Botany, Zoology, Physics, Economic Sci- 
ence, Chemistry, Geology or Mathematics— which shall constitute a 
line of work during the Junior and Senior years. The hours of study 
given to the science chosen shall not be less than three per week in 
each term; and not less than thirty- two hours of scientific work shall 
be taken during the two years. The scientific work outside of the 
particular line shall be selected by the student after consultation with 
the president and the head of the department in which the line of 
study is chosen. The other studies taken shall be selected by the 
student after consultation with the president and the heads of the 
departments baving charge of such studies. The studies for each 
term shall not be less than sixteen nor more than twenty hours per 
week. 

***Thls subject may be taken only on the recommendation of the 
professor under whom the student takes the major portion of his 
work. 



266 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND SEMESTEB. 



Calculus, 5 

Advanced Differential Equations, 3 

Animal Parasites, 2 

Bacteriology, 2 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 

Organic Chemistry, 5 

Money and Banking, 2 

Finance, 3 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

Comparative Anatomy, 5 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Debating, 1 

Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

**Domestic Science, 2 

Mineralogy, 4 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 

Military Science, 1 

Band Work, 1 

Public Speaking, 1 (Required) 



(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Mathematics, XI.) 

(Zoology, VIII.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Chemistry, IX.) 

(Economic Science, IV.) 

(Economic Science, V.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Zoology, VII.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, V.) 

(Geology, VI.) 

(Physics, XV.) 

(Military, VI.) 

(Public Speaking, VIII.) 



History, The French Revolution and the 19th Century, 3 

(History, VI.) 
History, The Constitutional History of England, 2 (History, XI.) 
Human Physiology, 5 (Zoology, XIII.) 

Physical Culture, 1 (for women), Required. 
♦Senior Year. 

FIEST SEMESTER. 

Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Analytic Geometry, 5 

(Mathematics, VII and XV.) 
Economic Problems, 3 (Economic Science, III.) 

History of Political Economy, 3 (Economic Science, II.) 

Mineralogy, 4 (Geology, VI.) 

History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 (History, III.) 

History, Diplomatic History of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 
American Literature, 3 (Literature, IV.) 

Domestic Art, 1 (Domestic Economy, VIII.) 

***Domestic Science, 1 (Domestic Economy, XX.) 



*Thesis not required. The head of any department may offer a 
total of three to six hours of research work. 
***If preceded toy D. E. II- V. 
**If preceded toy D. E. I. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



267 



Organic Chemistry, 5 or 

Blow-Pipe Analysis and Assaying, 5 

Psychology, 5 

Agrostology, 2 

Vegetable Pathology, 3 or 5 



(Chemistry, XIV.) 

(Chemistry, VII and VIII.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Botany, XIII.) 

(Botany, V.) 



Advanced Cryptogamic Botany, Ferns, 3 (Botany, XVII.) 

Chemistry, 5 (Chemistry, XI.) 

Dramatic Art, 2 or (Public Speaking, V.) 

Extempore Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, X.) 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 (Physics, XIV.) 

Morphology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, X.) 

Neurology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, XI.) 

Principles of American Government, 3 (Civics, II.) 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 (Zoology, IX.) 

Military Science, 1 (Military, VTL) 
Band Work, 1 

One Oration, required (Public Speaking, IX.) 

Botanical Seminar, 1 (Botany, XVIII.) 

The Short Story, 2 (Literature, VI.) 

SECOND SEMESTEE. 



Advanced Calculus, 4 

Mathematics, 1 

Evolution of Animals, 1 

Geology, 5 

Chemistry of the Household, 2 



(Mathematics, XVI.) 

(Mathematics, XVIII.) 

(Zoology, VI.) 

(Geology, IV.) 

(Chemistry, XVI and XVIA.) 



History, The Welding of the Nation, (1845-1900) (History, IV.) 
History, The Far Eastern Question (History, IX.) 

♦Domestic Science, 1 (Domestic Economy, XXI.) 



Vegetable Physiology, 2 or 5 

Advanced Bacteriology, 3 

Ethics, 3 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Advanced Extempore Speech, 2 

Chemistry, 5 or 

Chemistry, 4 or 

Chemistry, 4 

Evolution of Plants, 1 

Advanced Entomology, 3 to 5 

Physical Laboratory, 1 or 2 



(Botany, XL) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Psychology, II.) 

(Public Speaking, XI.) 

(Public Speaking, XI.) 

(Chemistry, XXXV.) 

(Chemistry, XXXI.) 

(Chemistry, XXXH.) 

(Botany, XIX.) 

(Zoology, IX.) 

(Physics, XV.) 



*If preceded t>y D. E, II-V or XX. 



268 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Evolution of Cultivated Plants, 

Morphology, 3 to 5 

Military Science, 1 

Band Work, 1 

Botanical Seminar, 

Industrial History of U. S., 2 

Romance and Novel, 3 

The Essay, 2 

State and Federal Government, l 



(Horticulture, XIIH.) 

(Zoology, X.) 

(Military, VIII.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 

(Economic Science, VI.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(Literature, VII.) 

(Civics, III.) 



GENERAL AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

(For Women Only). 

Academic Year. 

FIRST SEMESTER. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 or 

* German, 5 

Elementary Speech, 2 

Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(English, II.) 

(Languages, V.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Plane Geometry, 5 

English, 5 or 

*German, 5 

History, Advanced American, 4 



(Mathematics, V.) 

(Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, II.) 



Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



College Algebra, 
** German, 5 or 



(Mathematics, IV.) 
(Languages, V or VII.) 



*German may be taken only by those students who can show to 
the Professor of English satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the 
English of the Academic year. 

**Beglnning or Advanced German according to the preparation of 
the student. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



269 



French, 5 
Domestic Art, 2 
Ecology, 2 

Advanced Rhetoric, 5 
Physical Culture, 1 



(Languages, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Botany, II.) 

(English, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 5 

**German, 5 or 

French, 5 

Domestic Art, 2 

Histology, 4 

Gesture and Voice, 1 

Composition, 1 

Advanced Civics, 2 

Physical Culture, 1 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, VI or VIII.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, D7.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Public Speaking, II.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Civics, VI.) 



Sophomore Year. 



FIEST SEMESTEB. 



The Drama. 5 or 
Analytic Geometry . 
German, 5 or 4 or 
French, 4 
Domestic Art, 2 
Physics, 5 
Composition, 1 



(Literature, V.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Languages, VII or IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, VI.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(English, V.) 

Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries, 3 (History, V.) 

Physical Culture, 1 



SECOND SEMESTEB. 



German, 5 or 

French, 4 

Domestic Art, 2 

Physics, 3 

Chemistry, 5 

Composition, 1 

****Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 

Calculus, 5 

Physical Culture, 1 



or 



(Languages, VIII.) 

(Languages, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, VH.) 

(Physics, II.) 

(Chemistry, XXII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Mathematics, LX.) 



**Beginnining or Advanced German according the preparation of the 
student. 

**** Students electing Calculus will take Literature II as a re- 
quired study in tine Junior year. 



270 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



*****Jniop Year. 



FIBST SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Domestic Science, 2 
Public Speech, 2 
Physical Culture, 1 

(Electives). 
Chemistry, 5 
Vertebrate Zoology, 5 
Bacteriology, 2 
Analytic Geometry, 5 
Political Economy, 5 
Differential Equations, 3 
American Literature, 3 
The Short Story, 2 
Debating, 1 
The Renaissance, 2 
Advanced Interpretation, 2 
Market and Home Gardening, 2 
Floriculture, 2 
Cryptogamic Botany, 5 



(Domestic Economy, II.) 
(Public Speaking, VII.) 



(Chemistry, XXIV.) 

(Zoology, II.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Mathematics, VIII.) 

(Economic Science, I.) 

(Mathematics, X.) 

(Literature, IV.) 

(Literature, VI.) 

(English, VII.) 

(History, X.) 

(Public Speaking, III.) 

(Horticulture, V.) 

(Horticulture, XI.) 

(Botany, IV.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Domestic Science, 2 (Domestic Science, V.) 

The French Revolution and 19th Century, (History, VI.) 

Advanced Public Speech, 1 (Public Speaking, VIII.) 

Physical Culture, 1 

(Electives). 
Chemistry, 5 
Invertebrate Zoology, 5 
Fermentations, 2 

The Constitutional History of England, 2 
Calculus, 5 
Advanced Differential Equations, 3 



(Chemistry, IX.) 

(Zoology, III.) 

(Botany, XXI.) 

(History, XL) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 

(Mathematics, XL) 



Money and Banking, 2 



(Economic Science, IV.) 



*****In the Junior and Senior years a student may take each term 
not less than sixteen nor more than twenty hours per week. The time 
given to the sciences— Botany, Zoology, Geology, Physics, Economic 
Science, Chemistry and Mathematics— shall aggregate not less than 
thirty-two hours during the two years. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



271 



Finance, 3 

The Essay, 2 

Novel and Romance, 3 

Debating, 1 

Expression in Oratory, 2 

Ferns, 3 

Bacteriology, 3 

Plant Propagation, 3 

French, 5 

German, 5 



(Economic Science, V.) 

(Literature, VII.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(English, VIII.) 

(Public Speaking, IV.) 

(Botany, XVII.) 

(Botany, VIII.) 

(Horticulture, n.) 

(Languages, II.) 

(Languages, VI.) 



♦Senior Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Advanced Cookery, 1 
Laundry, 1 
Oration, 1 

(Electives). 
History of Art, 2 
Geography of Foods, 1 
Chemistry, 5 
American Literature, 3 
The Short Story, 2 
Debating, 1 



(Domestic Economy, XX.) 

(D. E., VHI.) 

(Public Speaking, IX.) 

(Domestic Economy, XI.) 
(Domestic Economy, XXV.) 
(Chemistry, XI.) 
(Literature, P7.) 
(Literature, VI.) 
(English, VII.) 
Spherical Trigonometry and Solid Analytic Geometry, 5 

(Mathematics, VII and XV.) 
History, National Expansion, 1783-1845, 3 (History, III.) 

History, Diplomatic History of the United States, 2 

(History, XII.) 
Dramatic Art, or Extempore Speech, 2 (Public Speaking, V or X.) 



Embryology, 3 to 5 

Principles of American Government, 3 

Vegetable Cytology, 3 

Botanical Seminar, 1 

General Geology, 5 

Psychology, 5 

Landscape Gardening, 2 

German, 5 

French, 5 

History of Political Economy, 2 

Economic Problems, 3 



(Zoology, V.) 

(Civics, II.) 

(Botany, XII.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 

(Geology, II.) 

(Psychology, I.) 

(Horticulture, VIII.) 

(Languages, VII.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Economic Science, II.) 

(Economic Science, III.) 



272 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Advanced Cookery, 1 
Home Management, 1 

(Electives). 
History of Art, 2 
Geography of Foods, 1 
Home Decoration, 1 
Sick Room Cookery, 1 
Seminar, 1 

Chafing Dish Cookery, 1 

History, The Welding of the Nation, 1845-1900, 3 
History, The Far Eastern Question, 2 



(Domestic Economy, XXI.) 
(Domestic Economy, XXIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXVI.) 

(Domestic Economy, XIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXX.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXVIII.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 



Plant Breeding, 3 

French, 5 

German, 5 

Chemistry, 2 

Ethics, 3 

The Essay, 2 

Novel and Romance, 3 

Debating, 1 

Division and Reunion, 3 

The Far Eastern Question, 2 

Advanced Dramatic Art, 2 or 

Extempore Speech, 2 

Civics, 3 

State and Federal Constitutions, 3 

Systematic Botany, 3 or 5 

Evolution of Plants, 1 

Botanical Seminar, 1 

Comparative Anatomy, 5 

Geology, 5 

Advanced Calculus, 4 

Mathematics, 1 

Industrial History of the United States 

Economic Botany, 2 

Chemistry, 5 



(Horticulture, IV.) 

(Language, IV.) 

(Language, VIII.) 

(Chemistry, XVI and XVIa.) 

(Psychology, II.) 

(Literature, VII.) 

(Literature, III.) 

(English, Vin.) 

(History, IV.) 

(History, IX.) 



(Public Speaking, VI.) 

(Civics, IV.) 

(Civics, III.) 

(Botany, XV.) 

(Botany, XLX.) 

(Botany, XVIII.) 

(Zoology, VII.) 

(Geology, P7.) 

(Mathematics, XVI.) 

(Mathematics, XVIH.) 

(Economic Science, VI.) 

(Botany, X.) 

(Chemistry, XXXV.) 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



273 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

(For Women Only). 

Academic Year. 



FIRST SEMESTEE. 



Algebra, 5 

Elementary Rhetoric, 5 or 
♦German, 5 
Elementary Speech, 2 
Drawing, 2 



(Mathematics, II or III.) 

(English, n.) 

(Language, V.) 

(Public Speaking, I.) 

(Mechanical Engineering, XIX.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Plane Geometry, 5 

English, 5 or 

♦German, 5 

History, Advanced American, 4 



(Mathematics, V.) 

(Literature, IX.) 

(Languages, VI.) 

(History, II.) 



Freshman Year. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



College Algebra, 5 
**German, 5 or 
French, 5 
Domestic Art, 2 
Ecology, 2 
Advanced Rhetoric, 
Physical Culture, 1. 



(Mathematics, IV.) 

(Languages, V or VII.) 

(Languages, I.) 

(Domestic Economy, I.) 

(Botany, n.) 

(English, III.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, 5 
** German, 5 or 
French, 5 



(Mathematics, VI.) 

(Languages, VI or VHI.) 

\ (Languages, n.) 



♦German may be taken only by those students who can show to 
the Professor of English satisfactory evidence of proficiency in the 
English of the Academic year. 

♦♦Beginning or Advanced G'erman according to the preparation of 
the student, 
18 



274 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Domestic Art, 2 
Histology, 4 
Gesture and Voice, 
Composition, 1 
Advanced Civics, 2 
Physical Culture, 1. 



German, 5 or 4 or 
French, 4 
Domestic Art, 2 
Physics, 5 
Composition, 1 
***The Drama, 5 or 
Analytic Geometry, 5 



(Domestic Economy, IV.) 

(Botany, III.) 

(Public Speaking, II.) 

(English, IV.) 

(Civics, VI.) 



Sophomore Year. 

FIEST SEMESTER. 



(Languages, VII or IX.) 

(Languages, III.) 

(Domestic Economy, VI.) 

(Physics, I.) 

(English, V.) 

(Literature, V.) 

(Mathematics, VTII.) 



Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries, 3 
Physical Culture, 1 



(History, V.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



German, 5 or 

French, 4 

Domestic Art, 2 

Physics, 3 

Chemistry, 5 

Composition, 1 

****Epic and Lyric Poetry, 5 or 

Calculus, 5 

Physical Culture, 1. 

Junior Year 



(Language, VTII.) 

(Language, IV.) 

(Domestic Economy, VII.) 

(Physics, II.) 

(Chemistry, XXII.) 

(English, VI.) 

(Literature, II.) 

(Mathematics, IX.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



Foods, 2 

Laundry, 1 

Home Sanitation, 1 

Geography of Foods, 1 

Chemistry, 5 



(Domestic Economy, II.) 

(Domestic Economy, VIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XVI.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXV.) 

(Chemistry, XXIV.) 



***Students electing Analytic Geometry may take Literature V as 
an elective in the Senior year. 

****Students electing Calculus may take Literature II as an elec- 
tive in the Senior year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



275 



Vertebrate Zoology, 5 
Bacteriology, 2 
Public Speech, 2 
Floriculture, 2 
Physical Culture, 1. 



(Zoology, II.) 

(Botany, VII.) 

(Public Speaking, VII.) 

(Horticulture, XI.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



Foods, 2 

Sick Room Cookery, 1 
Home Management, 1 
Geography of Foods, 1 
Chemistry, 5 
Invertebrate Zoology, 5 
Fermentations, 2 



(Domestic Economy, V.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXIII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXVI.) 

(Chemistry, IX.) 

(Zoology, III.) 

(Botany, XXI.) 



The French Revolution and 19th Century, 3 
Physical Culture, 1. 

Senior Year. 



(History, VI.) 



FIRST SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Advanced Cookery, 1 
Theory of Teaching D. E., 1 
Dietaries, 1 
Household Accounts, 1 
History of Art, 2 
Physiology, 5 
Oration, 1 

(Electives). 

Three to seven hours selected from the studies of the First 
Semester of the Junior and Senior years of the General and 
Domestic Science Course; may include "The Drama" if not taken 
in the Sophomore year. 



(Domestic Economy, XX.) 

(Domestic Economy, IX.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXIV.) 

(Domestic Economy, XXVII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XI.) 

(Zoology, XII.) 

(Public Speaking, IX.) 



SECOND SEMESTER. 



(Required). 
Advanced Cookery, 1 
Practice Teaching, 1 
History of Art, 2 
Home Decoration, 1 
Physiology, 5 



(Domestic Economy, XXI.) 

(Domestic Economy, X.) 

(Domestic Economy, XII.) 

(Domestic Economy, XIII.) 

(Zoology, XIII.) 



276 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Seminar, 1 (Domestic Economy, XXX.) 

(Elective). 
Chafing Dish Cookery, 1 (Domestic Economy, XXVIII.) 

Five to nine hours selected from the studies of the Second 
Semester of the Junior and Senior years of the General and 
Domestic Science Course; may include "Epic and Lyric Poetry" 
if not taken in the Sophomore year. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

EDGAR WILLIAM STANTON, PROFESSOR. 

MISS ROBERTS, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR. 

MR. PATTENGILL, MISS COLPITTS, MISS FLEMING, MR. JONES AND MR. 

TRAVIS, INSTRUCTORS. 

The work of the Department of Mathematics is directed to 
the following ends: 

(1) The Development of Intellectual Strength. — Such a 
degree of thoroughness is required as awakens interest and 
stimulates to earnest effort. The work is so arranged as to 
compel the student to abandon the mere mechanical methods of 
reaching results. He can make little or no progress except 
through the mastery of principles and methods; and in their 
application there is demanded of him a high degree of ingenuity, 
care and courage. He is subjected to the continuous discipline 
of holding details in mind, comparing facts, drawing conclusions 
and advancing to the discovery of new truth. He learns to think, 
judge, originate, and through his mathematical training gains 
mental strength. 

(2) Accuracy in Presentation of Mathematical Truths. — 
The student is required not only to think clearly, but to put his 
thought into concise and precise English. In the explanation of 
examples he is asked to bring out and emphasize the principles 
involved, dealing in detail with such equations only as are 
necessary to this purpose. In the solution of problems an 
analysis of statement and equation must be given, definitions 
and theorems must be stated clearly and accurately and in the 
demonstration of propositions the use of correct language is 
considered as secondary only to the employment of correct logic. 

(3) The acquirement of such Command of the Subject 
Matter of Mathematics as will make it a Valuable Instrument 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 277 

in Higher Scientific and Technical Study. — To this end an effort 
is made to eradicate from the student's mind the idea entertained 
by many, that mathematical truths are learned simply to be 
forgotten, and to awaken in its place an earnest desire to obtain 
a comprehensive and abiding knowledge of the essential facts of 
the science. Thoroughness in daily recitation is demanded, 
frequent reviews are given and final credits are made to depend 
largely upon the student's grasp of principles and the readiness 
and the accuracy with which he performs the simple and the 
complex operations involved in their application. Bach branch 
as it is taken up is so presented as to require the constant 
employment of the principles and facts of the preceding mathe- 
matical studies. The Department aims in this way to give the 
student such a degree of mathematical maturity and self-reliant 
mastery as will enable him to use his mathematical knowledge 
with profit either in advanced collegiate work or as an instructor 
in our high schools and academies. 

In the Engineering Courses, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonome- 
try, Analytical Geometry and Calculus are required studies. 
Algebra, Geometry and Trigonometry are required in the science 
courses, while the advanced mathematical work is either optional 
or elective. Solid Geometry is the only mathematical study 
required in the courses in agriculture. 

The following are the several courses in Mathematics: 

Course I. — Algebra to Involution. — First Semester, Academic 
year. It is expected that students entering this course will have 
such a knowledge of elementary algebra through simple equations 
as may be obtained by thorough work in the high school. If the 
student's preparation is in excess of this requirement it will be 
greatly to his advantage. 

The subjects included in the review and advance work of this 
course, are those which generally precede involution in any 
standard text. They are treated, however, in an exhaustive 
manner and the examples and problems given are more difficult 
than those found in the ordinary text-book. Special stress is laid 
upon the statement of definitions and the demonstration of 
principles. 

Course II. — From Involution to Ratio and Proportion. — Second 
Semester, Academic year. This course is open to those who have 
completed Course I. The following subjects are studied : Involu- 
tion of Monomials and Polynomials; Evolution, including the 



278 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

consideration of the higher roots of polynomials, and rules for 
determining the roots of numbers based upon the algebraic 
method of extracting roots; Radicals, including the fundamental 
operations, involution, evolution, rationalization, imaginary quan- 
tities, extracting the square root of binomial surds and the 
solution of equations involving radicals; Pure and Affected Quad- 
ratics; Equations solved like quadratics; and Simultaneous Quad- 
ratic Equations. Frequent written reviews are given covering 
work in this Course and Course I. 

At the completion of this course students are expected to 
have such grasp of algebra through quadratics as will enable 
them to handle its principles up to this point without error and 
perform the operations required, with rapidity and accuracy. 

Course III. — Algebra to Ratio and Proportion. — Second Se- 
mester, Academic year. This Course covers practically the same 
subjects as those enumerated in Courses I and II. Much of the 
work, however, is taken in rapid review, only one semester being 
devoted to the combined courses. The object aimed at is not 
elementary instruction in the science, but a wider grasp of 
principles and familiarity with their application in more difficult 
fields. Many of the examples assigned are such as are met with 
in the higher mathematics. The student is thus introduced to a 
quality of work demanding a broad view of principles and meth- 
ods and a marked degree of skill in algebraic manipulation. 

The course should be undertaken by those only who have 
already had large experience in algebraic work and who have 
developed considerable strength in this study. The minimum 
requirement for entrance is a thorough knowledge of algebra 
through simple equations. The Course is especially intended, 
however, for students who have completed algebra in the high 
school and who need to give the work a thorough review before 
entering upon advanced work. Admission is secured by examin- 
ation or upon the certificate of the proper officer of an accerdited 
high school. 

Course IV. — College Algebra. — First Semester, Freshman 
year. The subjects treated in this Course are ratio, proportion; 
variation, arithmetical progression, geometrical progression, 
harmonical progression, the binomial theroem, convergency and 
divergency of series, theorem of undetermined coefficients in- 
cluding partial fractions and reversion of series, principles and 



!^i 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 279 

use of logarithms, permutations and combinations, probability, 
determinants and the theory of equations. 

The Course is open to students of the College who have 
taken Courses I and II or Course III; also to graduates of the 
fully accredited high schools who furnish the proper certificates. 
The first ten days of the time alloted to the course is devoted to a 
review of algebra up to and including quadratics. Students who 
fail to stand the test of this review will be assigned to such 
work as they are prepared to undertake. 

Graduates of accredited schools are earnestly urged to 
carefully review their work in algebra before entering this 
course. The sample questions printed elsewhere in this cata- 
logue give a good idea of the knowledge of the subject needed. 
The Department will gladly unite with the student and his 
school principal in arranging to test the thoroughness of his 
home review; such test can be given in connection with the 
work of the high school and, if satisfactory to the Department, 
will be accepted in lieu of the review test at the College. The 
student can then begin his advanced work without delay. Stu- 
dents designing to take the review here must be present promptly 
at the opening of the semester. Correspondence regarding this 
whole matter is cordially invited. 

Students not graduates of the fully accredited schools will 
be admitted to this course upon passing a satisfactory examina- 
tion upon the work covered by Course III. As stated under 
"Requirements for Admission," arrangements can be made with 
the principals of high schools or county superintendents to 
conduct such examinations. The principal of any school desiring 
to test the ability of his students to enter upon the work of this 
course will be furnished, upon request, a list of examination 
questions. The Department will be pleased to mark the examin- 
ation papers and enter upon its records as accredited students in 
the Mathematical Department the names of all students who show 
that they are prepared to take up the work with success. 

Course V. — Plane Geometry. — Second Semester, Academic 
year. The topics included in this course are those usually 
treated in a standard text. They include the fundamental defin- 
itions and axioms, theorems relating to rectilinear figures and 
the circle, measurement of angles; doctrine of limits; theory of 
proportion; similar polygons; comparison and measurement of 
the surfaces of rectilinear figures; measurement of the circle, 



280 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and geometrical construction of plane figures. The text book 
used is Phillips and Fisher. The proofs outlined in the text 
must be fully amplified; definitions must be stated with preci- 
sion; authority cited must be given in full and the logical steps 
in demonstration must be so arranged and presented as to con- 
stitute a complete and rigid proof. The student must understand 
each proposition and be able to state the demonstration in con- 
cise geometric language. Special emphasis will be laid upon the 
demonstration of original exercises. The course is open to those 
who furnish the head of the department with satisfactory evi- 
dence that they have a thorough knowledge of the subjects in 
Course I. 

Course VI. — (a) Solid and Spherical Geometry. — This course 
is open to those who have met the requirements for admission to 
the mathematics of the Second Semester of the Freshman year. 
A week is given at the beginning to a review of plane geometry, 
one day being devoted to each book. Students are required to 
write out or demonstrate orally such propositions as may be 
assigned, using in preparation the text book studied in the 
preparatory school. Looking forward to this work the students 
immediately before leaving home should carefully go over the 
whole subject of plane geometry. Those who show in the week's 
review a satisfactory knowledge of definitions and ability to 
handle successfully advanced geometric work will be assigned 
to the classes in solid geometry. The subjects considered in the 
remainder of the course will be the properties of planes, of 
diedral and polyedral angles, of prisms, of pyramids and other 
polyedrons, of cylinders, cones and spheres, of spherical triangles 
and spherical polygons. 

(b) Plane Trigonometry. — Last 13 weeks, Second Semester, 
Freshman year. Courses III, IV, V, and Via are essential pre- 
liminary studies. The subjects investigated are definitions; 
positive and negative angles; circular measures of angles; oper- 
ations upon angles; functions of angles, their relations and 
varying values; determination of values of the functions of 
particular angles; functions of different angles expressed in 
terms of those of a basal angle; derivation and reduction of 
trigonometric formulas; solution of right and oblique triangles. 
The points most strongly emphasized are: Care in tracing the 
trigonometric functions of varying angles in the different quad- 
rants, readiness and skill in the derivation and reduction of 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 281 

trigonometric formulas, and accuracy in the use of logarithmic 
tables. 

Course VII. — Spherical Trigonometry. — This work is required 
in the First Semester, Junior year, of the Civil Egnineering 
course. It is elective to students in the science and domestic 
science courses. Course VI and the studies necessarily prelim- 
inary thereto are required for entrance. The spherical right 
triangle is investigated; triangles of reference are formed and 
formulas deduced therefrom; Napier's rules are applied; the six 
different cases arising in the solution of right triangles are 
discussed and illustrated by numerous examples. Spherical tri- 
angles in general are considered; the formulas relating thereto 
are derived and applied to the solution of examples; interesting 
problems connected with the celestial spheres are included in 
the course. 

Course VIII. — Plane Analytic Geometry. — First Semester, 
Sophomore year. This work is required in all engineering courses 
and is elective to all students who have completed Courses IV 
and VI. This subject is taught largely from the standpoint of 
its value as a disciplinary study. Once the student is impressed 
with the spirit of its method, the beauty of its logic and the 
excellent field for analytical reasoning it opens up, he will readily 
find his way to a mastery of the particular facts it reveals. The 
student is introduced to the subject through a review of the 
special algebraic, trignometric and geometric conceptions upon 
which it is based; these are applied to the analytic representa- 
tion of points in a plane and the proposition established that all 
geometric lines and curves can be represented by equations, and 
their properties and relations discovered by a study of these 
equations. The line, the circle and the conic sections are in this 
way most carefully investigated. Examples involving principles 
are solved and from a knowledge of particular the student is 
led to the demonstration of general theorems. The generalized 
truth is then employed in the development of other truth, and 
thus the student is given a most excellent drill in both inductive 
and deductive reasoning. At the same time his needs, as an 
engineering or scientific student, of a knowledge of the facts of 
analytic geometry, are fully met. The Analytic Geometry by 
Tanner and Allen of Cornell University is used as a text. 

Course IX. — Differential and Integral Calculus. — Second Se- 
mester, Sophomore year. All preceeding mathematical work 



282 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

should be completed before this course is undertaken. Calculus 
bears to that work the double relation that, while it is based 
upon it and cannot be pursued successfully except as the work 
has been well mastered, it on the other hand furnishes a most 
excellent opportunity for a general review of the preceding mathe- 
matical studies and gives to all that has gone before a signifi- 
cance and value which it would otherwise lack. It is therefore 
a most important part of any extended and thorough mathemati- 
cal course. The abstruse principles of this higher method of 
mathematical investigation are explained upon the theory of 
limits. The theory of infinitesimals is also employed. Instruc- 
tion is given by daily recitations with a review of the week's 
work each Friday. In differential calculus the rules of differ- 
entiation, expansion of functions, indeterminate forms, tangents, 
normals and asymptotes, direction of curvature, points of inflec- 
tion, radius of curvature, order of contact, the osculating circle, 
envelopes, singular points and maxima and minima of functions 
are studied. In integral calculus much time is spent in acquiring 
a usable knowledge of the forms of integration. Application of 
integration is then made to the determination of the lengths of 
plane curves, areas of plane surfaces and surfaces of revolution, 
volumes of solids of revolution and other solids. 

Course X. — Differential Equations. — This course is required 
of electrical engineers in the First Semester of the Junior year, 
and is open to all students of the College who have completed 
Course IX. The work covered by it may be considered as sup- 
plementary to integral calculus. The course includes the forma- 
tion of differential equations; solutions of equations of the first 
order with applications to geometry, mechanics and physics. 

Course XI. — Differential Equations. — This course is open to 
those who have completed Course X. The subjects covered are 
the methods of handling linear equations with constant and 
variable coefficients; exact differential equations; integration in 
series; equations of the second order with geometrical, mechan- 
ical and physical applications; ordinary differential equations 
with more than two variables; partial differential equations of 
the different orders. 

Course XII. — Algebra through Quadratics. — Given First Se- 
mester, Adademic year. This course, which is designed espec- 
ially for students in agriculture, covers the work in Course III. 
To complete it successfully in the time allowed, the student 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 283 

should have knowledge of at least the fundamental operations. 
It will be greatly to his advantage if he has taken the work as 
far as involution. 

Course XIII. — Algebra; Permutations and Combinations, Bi- 
nomial Theorem and Logarithms. — Given Second Semester, Acad- 
emic year, agricultural courses to those students who have com- 
pleted Course XII. Four weeks are devoted to this subject. 
The work includes permutations and combinations; the binomial 
theorem and logarithms. 

Course XV. — Advanced Analytic Geometry. — In the last ten 
weeks of the First Semester, of the Senior year, advanced work 
in analytic geometry will be taken up. Some time will be devoted 
to the general equation of the second degree and to higher plane 
curves, after which the study of analytic geometry of three dimen- 
sions will be considered. Prerequisites Mathematics VIII and IX. 

Course XVI. — Advanced Calculus. — Second Semester, Senior 
year. This course deals with the application of differential 
calculus to the discussion of the properties of curves. It treats 
of the application of both differential and integral calculus to 
functions of a complex variable and also investigates the subject 
of definite integrals and the use of double integration in meas- 
uring surfaces. The principles involved are illustrated by num- 
erous examples. Prerequisites, Mathematics, VIII and IX. 

Course XVIII. — Elective in the Science and General and 
Domestic Science courses, Senior year, Second Semester. All prev- 
ious Mathematics required. The course consists of lectures on the 
principles involved in the Mathematical courses already taken. 
Its main purpose is to emphasize those principles which are most 
important and to suggest methods of presenting them effectively 
in the class room. The course is intended especially to help 
those who expect to teach in mathematical lines. 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 

LOUIS BEVIEE SPINNEY, PROFESSOR. 
ME. TUTTLE AND MR. WENNER, INSTRUCTORS. 

This department is located in Engineering Hall. It occupies 
sixteen commodious rooms, including six laboratories, two stand- 
ardizing and testing rooms, two research rooms, two apparatus 
rooms, three offices and a large lecture room. 



284 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The lecture room is modern in its equipment, which includes 
a convenient system of darkening shutters for the windows and a 
large permanent lantern screen, to facilitate demonstration work. 
At the lecture room tables are electric, gas and water connections, 
placing at the disposal of the lecturer a water pressure of fifty- 
pounds per square inch and electric currents from storage batter- 
ies, and direct or alternating current dynamos. 

The department has a good equipment in apparatus for 
demonstration purposes, which is stored in apparatus rooms 
adjoining the lecture room. 

The general laboratory rooms are large and well lighted and 
are equipped with heavy oak tables, slate-top piers and wall 
tables with heavy stone tops for the support of the laboratory 
apparatus. Convenient electric, gas and water connections are 
provided. A very serviceable equipment in the apparatus used 
in general physical laboratory work is furnished. Among other 
apparatus may ue mentioned a laboratory clock, with electric 
connections, a chronograph, a reversion pendulum, two torsion 
pendulums for the experimental determination of "moment of 
inertia" and the "coefficient of simple rigidity," a physical pendu- 
lum, apparatus for the determination of the "intensity of gravity" 
by observations on a body rolling on an inclined plane, analytical 
balances, Jolly's balance, hydrostatic balance, apparatus for the 
determination of "Young's Modulus" by stretching and by bend- 
ing, apparatus for the coefficient of linear expansion, a catheto- 
meter, optical benches, telescopes and microscopes, spectroscopes, 
a saccharimeter, hydrometers, thermometers, barometers, gal- 
vanometers, Wheatstone bridges, "testing apparatus," electro- 
calorimeters, silver, copper and water voltameters, etc. 

The photometry rooms are equipped with several photometer 
benches and are furnished with gas and electric connections. 
The arrangement of apparatus is made with a view of facilitating 
the regulation tests of arc and incandescent lamps as well as 
those of other sources of illumination. 

The dynamo room is equipped with experimental dynamos, 
including arc machines and direct and alternating current ma- 
chinery of various types together with a convenient switch- 
board and extended system of electric connections. An equip- 
ment in ammeters, voltmeters, wattmeters, transformers, dyna- 
mometers, etc., is provided. 

The repair shop is fitted with an engine lathe, a speed drill, 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 285 

a set of machinist's and carpenter's tools and a stock of shop 
supplies. This room is used for the repair and manufacture of 
apparatus. 

The photographic laboratory is equipped with cameras and 
other appliances, dark rooms, skylights, screens, and back grounds 
for portrait and copying work, and water facilities. The equip- 
ment enables the carrying forward of a very practical course in 
photography in its various applications. 

The following courses are offered by the department: 

Course I. — Mechanics and Heat. — First Semester, and 

Course II. — Electricity and Magnetism and Light and Sound. 
— Second Semester. Two lectures, one recitation and one labor- 
atory per week. Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

In the First Semester of this course the study of mass, force, 
energy, and power is emphasized and special attention is given 
to the graphic methods of solving problems in force-actions, 
velocities, etc. A portion of this Semester is also given over to 
the discussion of radiation in general and wave motion. The 
other general topics are then taken up according to the outline 
given above. 

The laboratory work is kept parallel to the text book and 
lecture work and enables the emphasizing and fixing of the 
fundamental conceptions. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of students in 
the course of domestic science. The breadth of the course, 
together with the emphasis which is placed upon the essentials, 
adapt it to the needs of teachers and others who desire a general 
training in physics. Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. 
Wenner. 

Course III. — Mechanics and Heat. — First Semester, and 

Course IV. — Electricity and Magnetism and Light and Sound. 
— Second Semester. Two lectures and three recitations per 
week. Mathematics IV, V and VI required. 

This course is designed for engineering and general science 
students, although it is open to others who are properly prepared 
for the work. As in Course I, much stress is placed upon the 
fundamental principles of the work and in addition thereto a 
more thorough study of vector quantities and their graphical 
treatment is made. 

A view of the subject from the mathematical standpoint is 
emphasized and the student is urged to familiarize himself with 
the theoretical side of the question, as it is believed that such a 



286 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

foundation is very helpful if not absolutely essential to the work 
which follows. Text-book, Hastings and Beach, "General Phy- 
sics." Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course VI. — Electricity and Magnetism. — Three hours per 
week, First Semester. Physics III and IV and Mathematics IX 
required. 

Lectures, recitations and problem work. A course in the 
elementary theory of electricity and magnetism. Discussion of 
measuring instruments and laboratory methods of measuring the 
various electrical quantities. Text-book, Nichols and Franklin, 
"Elements of Physics," Vol. II. Professor Shane. 

Course VII. — Theory of Alternating Currents. — Two lectures 
per week. Second Semester. Physics VI and Mathematics X 
required. Professor Spinney. 

Course VIM. — Theory of Electrical Measurements. — Two lec- 
tures per week. First Semester. Physics VII required. Pro- 
fessor Spinney. 

Course IX. — Theory and Practice of Photography. — Class 
room and laboratory work, one hour each per week. First Semes- 
ter. Open to upper classmen only, upon recommendatino by the 
head of the department in which the student takes his major 
work. 

In the class room work is given a discussion of the optics 
and chemistry of photography. The manipulation of the negative 
and positive under the various processes to which it is sub- 
jected is also presented and the laboratory work is planned to 
give the student some skill in carrying forward the various 
methods of practical photography. The student is given practice 
in developing over and under exposed negatives, in copying and 
enlarging work, etc. Mr. Tuttle. 

Course X. — Dynamo Electric Machinery. — Three hours per 
week. Second Semester. Prerequisite, Physics VI. Professor 
Shane. 

Course XIV. — General Physical Laboratory. — Two afternoons 
per week. First Semester. 

Course XI VA. — One afternoon per week, First Semester. 

Measurement of length, mass, and time, determination of 
physical constants, use of the barometer, thermometry, calorim- 
etry, etc. Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XI VB. — One afternoon per week. Second Semester. 
Continuation of XIVA. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 287 

Course XV. — Physical Laboratory, Elementary Electrical 
Measurements. — One afternoon per week, Second Semester, or 

Course XVI. — Two afternoons per week, First Semester, or 

Course XVII. — Two afternoons per week, Second Semester. 

The measurement of the electro-motive force and internal 
resistance of primary and secondary batteries, the use of Wheat- 
stone's bridge, measurement of current, determination of galva- 
nometer constants, high resistance measurements and insulation 
tests, etc. Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XVIII. — Physical Laboratory, Electrical Testing. — 
Two afternoons per week, First Semester, or 

Course XIX. — Two afternoons per week, Second Semester. 
Professor Spinney, Mr. Tuttle and Mr. Wenner. 

Course XX. — Physical Laboratory, Dynamo, Motor and Com- 
mercial Plant Testing. — Two afternoons per week, First Semester. 

The efficiency of dynamos and motors, experimental deter- 
mination of characteristic curves, magnetic leakage, etc. Critical 
study of commercial plants, determination of efficiencies, etc. 
Professor Shane. 

Course XXA. — Physical Laboratory. Study of Alternating 
Currents. — One afternoon per week, First Semester. Laboratory 
methods for measuring inductance, capacity, etc., and, 

Course XXI. — Physical Laboratory. Study of Alternating 
Currents. — Two afternoons per week, Second Semester, Senior 
year. 

Continuation of XXA. The study of alternating current 
dynamos and motors and commercial transformers. Professor 
Spinney and Professor Shane. 

Course XXII. — Electric Circuits. — Two lectures per week, 
Second Semester. Physics VI required. Professor Fish. 

Course XXIV. — Electrical Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week, First Semester, Senior year. The design of dynamos, 
motors, transformers, etc. Professor Fish. 

Course XXV. — Electrical Designing. — Two afternoons per 
week, Second Semester, Senior year. Continuation of Course 
XXIV. Professor Fish. 

Course XXVI. — Thesis in Electrical Engineering begun, and 

Course XXVII. — Thesis in Electrical Engineering, finished 
Total equivalent of four hours per week for One Semester. 

Course XXVIII.— Thesis in Physics. 



ZOO IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

For a discussion of Courses X to XIII, XVIII to XXVII and 
XXIX to XXXII, see the Course in Electrical Engineering. 

The department offers thesis work in general physics, in 
heat, in light and sound, and in electricity and magnetism to 
students in other than the engineering courses. 

Courses III and IV and Courses X to XV are designed espec- 
ially for engineering students. Courses III, IV, XIV, XV, XVI and 
XVII are, however, open to other students as electives. 

For laboratory courses of two afternoons per week a fee of 
$5.00 is charged. For courses of one afternoon per week the fee 
is $3.00. 



DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 

ALFRED A. BENNETT, PEOFESSOR. 

L. A. PLACEWAY AND W. F. COOVER, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

R. C. M 'KINNEY, INSTRUCTOR. 

EFFIE M'KIMM, BIRD SLATER AND W. A. BEVAN, ASSISTANT INSTRUCTORS 

The study of chemistry begins in the Sophomore year with all 
students, excepting those in the Department of Veterinary Sci- 
ence, who begin their work the First Semester of the Freshman 
year. 

METHODS ^ND OBJECT OF INSTRUCTION. 

The aim of the instruction in Chemistry is to develop in the 
student the inductive and experimental method of study, to 
excite in him an appreciation and love for true experimentation 
and to train his powers for inductive thinking, thus laying a 
foundation for technical or applied Chemistry. 

The method of study is, therefore, distinctively the labora- 
tory method. On the average, the student employs two hours of 
time in laboratory study for every hour of recitation. This 
proportion of time for the two divisions of work is especially 
carried out in the earlier part of the class study. The class 
room work aims to fix in tne mind of the student chemical 
principles and facts based upon what has been learned by the 
actual handling and study of chemical substances. 

The work is arranged in courses, the course referring to the 
pursuit of a division of the subject for one semester without re- 



DIVISION OP SCIENCE 289 

gard to the number of hours per week that may be devoted to it. 
Three heurs of laboratory study is equivalent to one hour of 
recitation. 

DESCRIPTION OP COURSES OF STUDY. 

The work is conveniently grouped under the following 
general heads: (a) General and Descriptive Chemistry; (b) 
Analytical Chemistry, Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis; (c) 
Organic Chemistry; (d) Studies in Applied Chemistry. 

(a) General and Descriptive Chemistry includes an elemen- 
tary study of the non-metallic and metallic elements, their his- 
tory, occurrence, preparation, properties and their principal 
compounds. In order better to train his powers of observation 
the student is required to describe the apparatus used and the 
phenomena produced, and to trace the relation of the results 
obtained to laws and principles. 

The different courses in General and Descriptive Chemistry 
are arranged to meet, as far as is practicable, the special needs 
of the students of the various departments. However, it is 
recognized that at this stage of the work the Science of Chemis- 
try is the student's most practical acquisition. 

(b) Analytical Chemistry, both Qualitative and Quantita- 
tive, is taken up in an elementary way at first and may be 
followed by courses in more advanced work. After this pre- 
liminary knowledge is obtained, the direction of the work will 
depend to a great extent on the degree the student is aiming to 
obtain. For the degree in Agriculture the analytical study is 
directed to an examination of those substances of agricultural 
interest, and to prepare the student for an intelligent use of the 
scientific data upon which agriculture is founded. In any case 
the purpose is to study Applied Chemistry from the standpoint 
of its fundamental principles. 

In the recitations, methods of analysis are described and 
discussed and the study of the theoretical chemistry carried 
forward. In this work, courses of study are arranged for grad- 
uate as well as for under-graduate students. 

(c) In Organic Chemistry, courses are offered for the first 
degree and also as major and minor subjects for graduate 
students. 

The course required of the students of the Veterinary Depart- 
ment is of an elementary nature and is intended to give a suffi- 

19 



290 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

cient knowledge of the subject to lay the foundation for the 
study of Physiological Chemistry which follows. The latter 
course considers the chemical changes going on in the living 
animal body; the essential composition of foods and the changes 
through which they pass in the animal economy; the chemistry 
of the secretion and excretion. The laboratory study is devoted 
to the three principal food constituents and to urine analysis. 

The undergraduate in the division of Agriculture under the 
topic Organic Chemistry, studies in addition to the general prin- 
ciples of the subject, the chief food substances, i. e., the carbo- 
hydrates, fats, and proteids, poisonous substances found in the 
organic world, such as the alkaloids, ptomaines; the chemistry 
of milk and of the manufacture of butter and cheese. In a 
word, the student will consider, as completely as the time 
alloted to the subject will allow, the important questions that 
concern agriculture from the chemical standpoint. 

To under-graduate students in the Division of Science is 
given a fairly complete outline of the theory of the structure 
and formation of organic compounds, but special attention is 
given to those compounds that are of commercial importance. In 
the laboratory the student prepares many of the more important 
manufactured organic substances, such as alcohol and soaps, and 
makes a special study of vinegars, sugar, petroleum and its 
products, glycerine, etc. 

With this work as a foundation the graduate student selects 
some feature or features for more complete study. The amount 
and character of the work is left for arrangement between the 
individual and the head of the department. However, this will 
embrace such work as the analysis and study of foods, oils, fats, 
and the methods of preparation, purification, and adulteration of 
commercial organic substances. 

(d) It is recognized among persons whose opinions are 
worthy of consideration that the application of any science to the 
problems of life can be profitably taken up by the student only 
after a thorough grounding in the principles upon which the 
science rests. The purpose of the preliminary courses in this 
subject is to give this training as completely as possible. 

Some eighteen courses of study in applied chemistry are 
offered, or are required of the students for the various degrees 
open to them. In the nature of the case, this work is essentially 
quantitative analysis and consists of courses in the analysis of 



DIVISION OP SCIENCE 291 

Agricultural products; Fuel and Gas Analysis; Blowpipe Analy- 
sis; Assaying and Metallurgy; Chemistry of the Household; The 
Preparation of Organic and Inorganic Compounds. 

The courses in Agricultural Analysis will include both in- 
organic and organic substances; such as: Soils, fertilizers, 
water, fodders and dairy products. This work will be open to 
undergraduate and graduate students, i. e., the latter class of 
students will carry forward the work begun in the usual college 
courses. 

The course in Fuel and Gas Analysis will consist of the 
study of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels, in reference to their 
composition, and to their relative economic values. The student 
may devote the time of this course, principally, to technical 
analysis. Although the work is largely done in the laboratory 
it will be supplemented by lectures and recitations. The stand- 
ard forms of apparatus will be used. 

The principles and methods of quantitative analysis learned 
in the elementary course will be applied in the advanced work 
to the analysis of various organic and inorganic substances, such 
as foods, iron and steel. The application of the facts of Electro- 
chemistry to the quantitative analysis of ores, and in the manu- 
facture of chemicals will be studied in an elementary manner. 

Quantitative Analysis by the "fire methods" is applied to 
gold, silver, copper and lead ores. This work is introduced by 
a blowpipe study of minerals, and is intended to support and 
supplement the subject of Descriptive Mineralogy and Crystallog- 
raphy which are studied in the Department of Geology. 

The study* of Metallurgy will consider the chemical changes 
going on in the separation of the principal metals of the indus- 
tries and the assaying of metallurgical substances by wet process. 
This will include the chemical changes in the ores, fluxes, and 
fuels, occurring during the processes in the preparation of metals, 
and also the quantitative analysis of such substances. The sub- 
ject is considered in lectures, recitations and laboratory practice. 

The courses in chemical preparations will include the forma- 
tion of pure and commercial articles from raw materials, and 
the common adulterations of these products. 

The Chemistry of the Household considers the elementary 
chemistry of the principal food materials, changes produced in 
them during cooking and digestion, of cleaning and of adultera- 
tion of the chief food substances. 



292 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

This course can be accompanied by a laboratory study of 
soaps, soap preparations, sugars, syrups, vinegars, and baking 
powders. It must be preceded by a course in elementary quan- 
titative analysis. 

The work in Physiological Chemistry for the student in the 
Science Division (Course XXXV) includes a careful study in 
the laboratory, of the composition of foods, the chemical char- 
acteristic of their constituents, the changes during digestion 
and assimilation and the products of metabolism. The classroom 
work correlates these facts and by lectures and text-book they 
are given their appropriate explanation. 

The work in Water Analysis covers a study of the methods 
employed, namely the so-called mineral and sanitary analysis, 
and the interpretation of these results, especially from the stand- 
point of the household, and for use in boilers in the production of 
steam. Methods of purification of water and a study of sewage 
will receive attention. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION. 

FIEST SEMESTER. 

Course I. — Elementary Inorganic Chemistry. — Recitations 
two hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Veterinarians. 
Freshmen. 

Course III. — General Chemistry.— Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Engineers, Sophomores. 

Course V. — Qualitative Analysis. — Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation of Course II. 
Junior or Senior year. 

Course VII. — Blowpipe Analysis. — Recitations, two, and lab- 
oratory practice, three afternoons for one-half semester. Requir- 
ed of Mining Engineering students, and elective for students of 
Division of Science. Junior year. Courses II and V, or III and 
VI, required. 

Course VIII. — Assaying. — Recitations, two hours, and labor- 
atory practice, three afternoons for one-half semester. Junior 
year. Required of Mining Engineering students. Elective for 
students in Division of Science. Junior year. Courses II and V. 
or III and VI, required. 

Course X. — Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Lectures, two 
hours. For students in the Veterinary Department only. Sopho- 
more year. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 293 

Course XI. — Quantitative Analysis. — Recitations, two hours. 
Laboratory practice, three afternoons. Junior and Senior years. 
Must be preceded by Courses II and V or III and VI. 

Course XIV. — Organic Chemistry. — Five hours. A continua- 
tion of Course IX. Work subject to arrangement by bead of 
department and student. Senior year, or as a major or minor 
graduate study. 

Course XVII. — Fuel and Gas Analysis. — Three hours. Elec- 
tive for students of Division of Science. Courses II, V, IX and 

XI required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XVIII. — Electro-chemistry. — Three hours. Senior 
year. Elective for students of Division of Science. Courses II, 
V and XI required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XXI. — For students in the Agricultural Division, 
which see. 

Course XXIV. — Elementary Applied Chemistry. — Recitations, 
three hours. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. G. D. S. and 
D. S. students. Junior year. 

Courses XXV, XXVII, XXVI 1 1 are for students in the Agri- 
cultural Division, which see. 

Course XXX. — Continuation of Course XII. Two hours. 
Mostly laboratory practice. Senior year. Courses II, V, XI or 

XII required when elected by Division of Science students. Re- 
quired of Mining Engineering students. 

Course XXXIII. — Qualitative Analysis. — Continuation of 
Course V. Recitation, two hours. Laboratory practice, two or 
three afternoons. Elective Junior or Senior years. Division of 
Science. 

Course XXXV. — Organic Preparations. — Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, two or three afternoons. Elective 
in Division of Science. Courses II, V and IX required. 

SECOND SEMESTER. 

Course II. — General Chemistry. — Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Sophomore year. Division 
of Science. 

Course IV. — General Chemistry (Metals). — Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Freshman. Veter- 
inary Science students only. 

Course VI. — Qualitative Analysis. — Recitations, three hours. 
Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Continuation of Course III. 



294 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course IX. — Organic Chemistry. — Recitations, four hours. 
Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Junior or Senior years. 
Science, G. D. S. and D. S. Must be preceded by Courses II and 
V. 

Course XII. — Metallurgy. — Lectures and recitations, one hour, 
Junior year. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Required of 
Mining Engineering students. Elective for students in Division 
of Science. Courses II., V., VII. and VIII. required. 

Course XIII. — Physiological Chemistry. — Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, one afternoon. Sophomore year. 
Required for students in Veterinary Department. 

Course XV. — Analysis of Foods. — Three hours. Elective for 
students in Division of Science. Courses II., V., IX. and XI. re- 
quired. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XVI. — Chemistry of the Household. — Sixteen lectures, 
Senior year. Must be preceded by Courses XXII., XXIV. and IX. 
Offered to students of science as related to the industries, and 
in domestic science. 

Course XVI (a). — This course is to accompany Course XVI. 
and is wholly laboratory study. Senior year. Must be preceded 
by Courses XXII., XXIV., IX. and XI. Domestic Science students, 
one or two afternoons. 

Course XIX. — Water Analysis. — Three hours. Senior year, 
Elective for students in Division of Science. Courses II, V, IX 
and XI. required. Major or minor graduate study. 

Course XX. — Special Work in Chemistry for the Preparation 
of a Graduate Thesis. — This subject is usually selected along the 
line of applied chemistry. 

Course XXII. — Elementary Chemistry. — Recitations, three 
hours. Laboratory practice two afternoons. G. D. S. and D. S. 
students. Sophomore year. 

Course XXIII. — For students in the Agricultural Division, 
which see. 

Courses XXVI., XXIX. and XXXIV.— For students in the Agri- 
cultural Division, which see. 

Course XXXI. — Inorganic Preparations. — Recitations, two 
hours. Laboratory practice, two or three afternoons.. Courses 
II, V and IX required. Elective in Division of Science. 

Course XXXII. — Quantitative Analysis. — Continuation of 
Course XI. Recitation and laboratory practice, four hours. 
Elective Junior or Senior years. Division of Science. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 295 

Course XXXVI. — Physiological Chemistry. — Recitations, three 
hours per week. Laboratory practice, two afternoons. Elective 
for the Science, G. D. S. and D. S. students. Courses II., V. and 
IX. are requisite for this course. 

Graduate students will be provided with work in Organic and 
Inorganic Chemistry extending through two years if desired. 

This subject is open as a major study to graduates of this 
and other colleges of equal standing who have pursued the study 
of chemistry for two years and who are by this prepared to carry 
on independent work in the various directions that may be ar- 
ranged by them and the head of the department. The courses 
of study will be along the lines of Applied or Industrial Chemistry 
with ' a sufficient ground work of theoretical study to give a 
rational explanation and conception of the processes involved. 
The work will include advanced analytical and synthetical chem- 
istry, i. e., a study of the methods of chemical analysis and of 
the preparation of organic and inorganic compounds of industrial 
and commercial importance. The graduate student will select 
work along some one of these general lines of study and will 
devote his time to this, supporting it by other necessary collateral 
study, and such research in the literature of the subject as the 
library facilities will permit. A good reading knowledge of the 
German language will be essential to good progress in the prose- 
cution of the work. Minor subjects in this department will be 
arranged so as to help as much as is possible the major subjects 
selected in the other departments. 

Equipment and Accommodations. 

The Chemical department occupies the whole of the four 
floors of the building known as Chemical Hall. The building is 
"T" shaped with a front 70 feet by 40 feet and a wing 60 feet by 
32 feet. The space is divided into twenty-seven rooms, ten of 
which are laboratories, the remainder being lecture, office, bal- 
ance, and store rooms. 

The laboratories contain working tables which by a system 
of lockers can accommodate six hundred students. The assay- 
ing laboratory is well supplied with tables, furnaces and other 
apparatus for fire assaying. The laboratory for the course in 
blow piping is fitted with air blast and all of the usual conven- 
iences for such laboratories. 



296 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The department is well supplied with accurate weights and 
balances for the courses involving quantitative analysis. 

The department is amply equipped with apparatus and chem- 
icals for all of the work outlined in the courses of study offered. 

Persons desiring to prepare themselves to become teachers 
of chemistry, analytical chemists, or those seeking a preparation 
for the study of medicine will find here good facilities for study. 
The expenses are only sufficient to cover the actual post of the 
material used in the prosecution of the work. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY. 

A. A. BENNETT, PROFESSOR. 
W. F. COOVER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

The aim of the work in Agricultural Chemistry is twofold ; 
namely, to give the student a fundamental knowledge of chem- 
istry, and then to apply this knowledge to the chemical prob- 
lems of agriculture. 

A sufficient amount of time during the first year and a half of 
study is applied to the acquiring of chemical principles and 
relations, yet at the same time the application of these facts is 
considered and constitutes a portion of the work. In other words 
the study of the science of chemistry accompanies its application 
to agricultural questions. The later work of the courses is prin- 
cipally devoted to Applied Chemistry. 

The courses of study open to the undergraduate students are 
briefly described as follows: 

CourseXXI. — Elementary Experimental Chemistry. — This is 
the introductory work for the students in the agricultural courses 
and is intended to give knowledge of matter by actual handling 
and experience with it. The recitations are upon the laboratory 
work for the purpose of obtaining a first-hand knowledge of 
chemical changes. The student learns the necessity for tak- 
ing notes of useful data, and how to interpret these facts and 
apply them to common chemical changes that are going on in 
nature. This course includes a study of the so-called non-metallic 
elements that are present in the air and soils, etc. There are 
three recitations and two afternoons of laboratory practice per 
week. First Semester, Sophomore year. 

Course XXIII. — This course is a continuation of Course XXI., 
dealing with the metallic elements and their relations to those 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 297 

studied in the preceding term. In this course the student be- 
comes acquainted with the basic elements in the soil and their 
relations to non-metallic compounds, i. e., the acids and their 
place in the formation of salts. He learns how to separate and 
recognize these elements, their compounds, preparatory to deter- 
mining them quantitatively. Three recitations and two after- 
noons of laboratory work are required each week. Second Semes- 
ter, Sophomore year. 

Course XXV. — Organic Chemistry. — This course follows reg- 
ularly Courses XXI. and XXIII. and deals with substances pro- 
duced by animal and plant life. The laboratory study brings 
the student in touch with the properties and methods of prepar- 
ing organic food material. The sugars, starches and proteids, 
the simpler food material will be studied and at the same time 
the fundamentals of organic chemistry will be required. The 
work is divided into three recitations and one laboratory period 
per week, during the First Semester, Junior year. 

Course XXVI. — Chemistry Applied to Agriculture. — This 
work will be introduced in the laboratory study by quantitative 
analysis of inorganic substances followed by analyses of soils, 
fertilizers and other inorganic substances related to agricultural 
processes. The recitation work, two hours per week, will follow 
the laboratory practice and be accompanied by text-book and 
lecture study. 

Course XXVII. — Chemistry Applied to Agriculture. — This 
course will consider in an elementary manner the organic phase 
of Agricultural Chemistry and will deal with the chemical 
changes in foods during digestion and assimilation, and the 
changes that occur in the plant and animal body. Some time 
will be devoted to dairy products and especially to the methods 
of analyzing such substances for adulteration. Laboratory prac- 
tice will occupy two afternoons per week. 

Course XXXIV. — This is a continuation of Course XXVII. 
It is expected that the student electing this work will take up 
some special line of investigation as a result of the work done 
in the courses that have preceded it. The requisite courses are 
XXI, XXIII, XXV, XXVI, XXVII. For example, the student may 
desire to investigate somewhat fully the kind and character of 
organic matter in fertile soils; the effect of the composition of 
food on the composition of milk, as a whole or as to any of its 
constituents; changes in the composition of cheese during ripen- 



298 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ing, etc. This course is intended to take the student into the 
subject as far as can be profitably done by the undergraduate. 

The time devoted to the subject is not less than three hours 
nor more than five hours per week in the Second Semester of the 
Senior year. The work is largely done in the laboratory but is 
supplemented by consulting authorities and conferences with the 
instructor. 

Course XXVI II. — Dairy Chemistry. — Lectures and laboratory 
practice. This course is for students in the one year course in 
dairying, and will be arranged to fit the needs and the prepara- 
tion of such students, but it will be an elementary character 
throughout. First Semester. 

Course XXIX. — Continuation of Course XXVIII. Second Se- 
mester. 

Graduate Work in Agricultural Chemistry. 

Advanced work in Agricultural Chemistry leading to the 
Master's degree in Scientific Agriculture may be selected either 
as a major or minor study. This work may be taken in the 
Chemical department as a continuation of the work begun as an 
undergraduate of this or any other college of equal rank, or 
the student may elect to do this work with the chemical 
section of the Experiment Station, thus coming in touch with 
the research work and investigations being carried on there. 
The following courses of graduate work are offered: 

Course I. — Chemistry of Soils. — This course embraces a 
study in Soil Chemistry and its relation to plant life, including 
the chemical composition, its relation to fertility, the determina- 
tion of available plant food, fertilizers and other substances 
which are effective in the production of crops, also the study of 
rain and drainage waters, the loss of plant food due to improper 
drainage and other conditions. 

Course II. — Chemistry of Dairying. — This work will cover a 
general survey of the field of chemistry applied to dairy prob- 
lems such as the composition and chemical changes of butter, 
milk and cheese, and also other oils and fats used as food prod- 
ucts and for adulteration. 

Course III. — Chemistry of Feeds. — This course includes a 
careful study of the chemistry of plants and field crops, such as 
the chemical composition of corn, wheat and oats, methods of 
modifying and improving the chemical composition by selection 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 299 

and plant breeding, chemical study of growing plants during the 
various stages of development, etc., the effects of various ele- 
ments in the soil on the composition and quality and the yield 
or productiveness of the grain and forage crops. The study of 
the chemical composition and nutriments of the various refuse 
and by-products used for stock feeding. 

Course IV. — Chemistry of Horticulture. — This course in- 
cludes a careful study of the chemical composition of fruits, 
including the influence of various elements present in the soil 
on the composition, quality and productiveness of the orchard, 
vineyard or garden; also the influence of climatic conditions 
upon the composition and quality of fruits, and the influence of 
selection and breeding. 

DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY. 

LOUIS HERMANN PAMMEL, PROFESSOR. 

E. E. BUCHANAN, ESTELLE D. FOGEL, H. S. FAWCETT, CHARLOTTE M. 

KING, HABRIETTE KELLOGG. 

The Department of Bontay has temporary quarters on the 
first floor of Margaret Hall and in part of the annex. The botan- 
ical labroatory has an east and south exposure. The room is 
divided up into sections permitting instruction in Botany I. and 
II as well as the advanced work. For the purpose we have ten 
research tables, five large laboratory tables and ten tables for 
the students in Botany I. and II. The lecture room is in the west 
end of the room and has a seating capacity for sixty students. 
There are charts for the purpose of illustration, and mounted 
specimens of weeds, diseases of plants, etc. There are twenty- 
five compound microscopes of the following makes: Bausch & 
Lomb, Zeiss, Leitz & Beck, microtomes, various accessories, and 
reagents for the purpose of doing cytological work. The bacter- 
iological laboratory has a general equipment consisting of the 
various forms of apparatus. Arnold's Steam Sterilizer, dry 
oven for dry sterilization, platinum needles, plate holders for 
plates, Petri dishes, leveling tripod, incubator, thermo-regulators, 
etc. 

Beginning with the fall of 1905 the Department of Bontay 
will be housed in the new central building. Laboratories will be 
fitted up here with the most modern equipment, and splendid 
facilities offered for the pursuit of botanical work along every 
line. 



300 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

The Department ©f Botany offers excellent facilities, not 
only to the under-graduate students, but to the graduate students 
along the lines of botany. 

HERBARIUM. 

The various collections of the Department of Botany now 
amount to about seventy thousand specimens. The herbarium 
is very full in plants from Iowa and the Mississippi valley, and 
contains in addition a large number of plants from the eastern 
states, California and Europe. The collection may be divided 
into several parts; the General Phanerogamic Herbarium which 
was started by Dr. C. E. Bessey and continued by Dr. Halsted; 
the Parry collection and the Cryptogamic Herbarium; the Hol- 
way Herbarium, except the TJredinesee, the Fink Herbarium ex- 
cept lichens, and the Andrews' collection. 

Grass Collection. — The Herbarium contains an excellent col- 
lection of grasses, having material from every part of the state, 
besides a very representative collection from various parts of 
the United States and Europe. This collection is invaluable to 
the students of Agrostology. 

The Parry Collection. — This contains 22,000 specimens. It 
was purchased at a considerable expense from Mrs. Parry and 
contains hundreds of new species found by Dr. Parry on his 
collecting trips, and is especially rich in the plants of California, 
Mexico and the Rocky Mountain region. Many of these speci- 
mens were collected before the advent of the railroad. Many 
of the specimens in this collection are type specimens and hence 
are invaluable. 

Dendrological Collection. — The College Herbarium has a good 
representative collection for dendrological study. Many of the 
trees are likewise represented by photographs of the living trees. 
Of these photographs there are several thousand from Iowa, the 
Mississippi valley and the Rocky Mountains. 

Economic Collection. — Aside from the economic trees the 
Department of Botany has an excellent collection of the culti- 
vated plants of the United States and Europe. There is a collec- 
tion of the weedy plants of Iowa. 

Seed Collection. — The seed collection contains the sets dis- 
tributed by the United States Department of Agriculture, several 
German sets of weed seeds and a large collection of the seeds of 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE v 301 

the native plants, wild and cultivated. The collection is of use in 
studying the commercial seeds and their adulterations. 

The Cryptogamic Collection. — This contains a large number 
of very valuable exsicatti. It contains the Ravenel Fungi Amer- 
icani Exsicatti, Ellis' North American Fungi, the Von Thuemen 
Mycotheca Universalis, and numerous smaller collections. 

Living Material. — Living material is obtained from the plants 
grown by the Departments of Agriculture and Horticulture, the 
grounds of the latter being very rich in ligneous plants from 
Europe, Asia and America. 

Courses of Instruction. 

Course I. — Elementary Botany. — This course embraces a 
study of the morphology of flowering plants, the terms used in 
descriptive botany and the determination of simple flowering 
plants. Leavitt's Lessons and Gray's Manual are used as texts, 
accompanied by lectures and specimens designed to illustrate the 
subject. The lecture work is supplemented by a thorough labora- 
tory course covering the chief points in elementary botany such 
as the germination of seed, the different plant members, root and 
shoot, and the lateral appendages, the leaves, the flower, the fruit 
and the seed. A brief outline of the vegetable kingdom beginning 
with the lower forms of plant life, bacteria, algaee, mosses and 
ferns and the minute structure of plants supplemented with the 
study of the more common flowering plants found in the vicinity 
of Ames. A collection of fifty specimens of flowering plants is 
required. Excursions to some convenient point for the purpose 
of studying the native flora are obligatory. No student will be 
given credit for this work who has not given evidence of a good 
laboratory course of three hours a week for twenty weeks. Two 
hours, one lecture and one laboratory, Second Semester, Acade- 
mic. Required of all students in the Division of Agriculture and 
the Division of Science. Dr. Pammel and Miss Fogel. 

Course II. — Ecology. — A course in which the relations of 
plants to their environment are considered, the relations between 
insects and flowers, pollination by the wind and other agencies. 
Dissemination of plants by various agencies and the distribution 
of plants over the earth's surface and factors that influence dis- 
tribution; plant communities. Excursions are an essential feat- 
ure of this course. The laboratory course covers the work taken 
up in the lecture room. The more important fall plants are 



302 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

studied with reference to their pollination. Similar work is done 
on the dissemination of plants, and also a study of plants with 
reference to their environments. Two hours. One lecture and 
one laboratory. Required, First Semester, Freshman year, of all 
students in the Division of Science, and First Semester, Sopho- 
more year, in Courses in Horticulture, Dairying, Animal Hus- 
bandry, and Science and Agriculture. Prerequisite; Botany I. 
Dr. Pammel and Miss Fogel. 

Course III. — Histology. — This course is designed as an ele- 
mentary one. Since students are unfamiliar with the use of the 
microscope they are taught the use of the same, beginning with 
very simple objects, such as an air bubble and cotton fibre, then 
passing on to a study of the cell with its contents, such as starch, 
protoplasm, nucleus, and crystals. The division of cells and nuc- 
leus are studied in the light of modern investigations. The lab- 
oratory work supplements that of the class room; the different 
organs and parts of a plant are taken up, not merely as histologi- 
cal structures but considered from a physiological standpoint. As 
an illustration the cuticle, cuticularized and cellulose layers of 
the leaf of the agave are considered in relation of their signifi- 
cance in preventing transpiration. The absorbing, assimilating, 
aerating and conducting systems are considered in the same way. 
Four hours; three lectures and one laboratory. Required, Second 
Semester, Freshman year, of students in the Division of Science; 
Second Semester, Sophomore year, in the courses of Agron- 
omy, Horticulture, and Science and Agriculture. Elective in the 
courses in Dairying and Animal Husbandry. Prerequisite; 
Botany I. Dr. Pammel and Mr. Fawcett. 

Course IV. — Cryptogam ic Botany. — A systematic study of all 
the plants below the flowering plants. Special attention is given 
to smuts, rusts, molds and mildews from their significance in 
agriculture. The morphology and life history of the different 
groups of cryptogams is considered. Frequent excursions are 
obligatory. Five (Science) or four (Agriculture) hours; three 
lectures, one or two laboratories. Elective First Semester, Sopho- 
more year in Course in Science, and First Semester, Junior year 
in G. and D. S., Horticulture, Animal Husbandry, and Science and 
Agriculture, and First Semester, Senior year in Domestic Science. 
Prerequisite: Botany I. Dr. Pammel and Mr. Fawcett. 

Course V. — Vegetable Pathology. — In this course plant dis- 
eases of the farm, garden and horticultural crops are taken up. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 303 

Lectures on the more injurious of the fungous diseases of cultivat- 
ed plants are given in a more extended way than is possible in the 
Sophomore year. The theories of immunity and prevention of 
diseases, rotation of crops and fungicides are considered. In this 
course the diseases are treated from the standpoint of the host 
plant. Three or five hours, First Semester, Senior year. Re- 
quired in courses in Horticulture, and Science and Agriculture, 
and elective in courses in Animal Husbandry and Science. Pre- 
requisites; Botany I and IV. Dr. Pammel. 

Course VI. — Advanced Cryptogam ic Botany. — This course 
embraces a study of the more important orders of cryptogams, 
especially with reference to the flora of Iowa. Three hours, one 
lecture and two laboratories. Elective First Semester, Junior 
year, courses in Science and Dairying, and First Semester, Senior 
year, in courses in Horticulture, and Science and Agriculture. 
Prequisites; Botany I. and IV. Dr. Pammei. 

Course VII. — Bacteriology. — The laboratory work consists in 
studying some of the common germs and the general bacteriolo- 
gical techinque. In the lectures special attention is paid to the 
matter of sanitation and means of preventing contagious dis- 
eases. The work is taken up in two divisions; first, the making 
of media, sterilization, biology and classification of bacteria, and 
general considerations as to the relation of bacteria to human 
health and hygiene; second, the diseases of the lower animals. 
Texts, Abbott's Bacteriology and Muir and Ritchie's Manual. 
Two hours; one lecture and one laboratory. Required First Se- 
mester, Sophomore year, in Veterinary Course, First Semester, 
Junior year, in course in Domestic Science; Second Semester, 
Junior year, in courses in Agronomy, Horticulture, Dairying, and 
Science and Agriculture, and elective First Semester, Junior 
year, G. & D. S., and Second Semester, Junior year, Animal Hus- 
bandry and Science. Dr. Pammel and Mr. Buchanan. 

Course VIII. — Advanced Bacteriology. — This is an elective 
in the Senior year in which special attention is given to a study 
of water and micro-organisms. The work is in advance of that 
done in the Junior year. It is intended especially for persons 
who intend to enter a professional life either along the lines of 
sanitary engineering or other professions. Sedgwick's "Prin- 
ciples of Sanitary Science and the Public Health," with special 
reference to the causation of diseases, Muir and Ritchie's "Man- 
ual of Bacteriology" are used. Three hours, one lecture and two 



304 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

laboratories. Elective Second Semester, Senior year, in all courses 
in Divisions of Agriculture and Science. Prerequisite; Botany 
VII. Dr. Pammel and Mr. Buchanan. 

Course IX. — Structural Botany. — This course begins in the 
First Semester of the Freshman year. The work consists of reci- 
tations and lectures. The student is expected to become familiar 
with the morphology of flowering plants and the terms used in 
descriptive botany. In the study of identification and selection 
of drugs it is necessary to have a thorough botanical knowledge 
of general structural botany as well as vegetable histology. Vege- 
table drugs not only consist of the entire plant but frequently 
of parts only. In this course the general structure of the plant 
from the root to the reproductive organs, is taken up and con- 
sidered. In the laboratory the student takes up the histology 
of plants especially from the standpoint of pharmacognosy, with 
a brief survey of the more important plants from a systematic 
standpoint. Three hours, two recitations and one laboratory. 
Required First Semester, Freshman year, Veterinary. Dr. Pam- 
mel and Miss Fogel. 

Course X. — Economic Botany. — In this course special atten- 
tion is given to a microscopic study of foods. The principal 
cereals and food plants are studied with reference to their 
general and minute structure as it gives the student a general 
idea of the nature of vegetable foods as well as the reserve mate- 
rial of plants and the systematic position of our economic plants, 
where they originated and where chiefly cultivated. Two hours, 
one lecture and one laboratory. Required First Semester, Junior 
year, Horticulture. Elective First Semester, Junior year, in Dairy- 
ing, Animal Husbandry, Science and Agriculture and Science, 
and First Semester, Senior year, G. & D. S., and Domestic Science. 
Prerequisite; Botany I. Dr. Pammel. 

Course XI. — Vegetable Physiology. — A course of lectures 
with demonstrations on the functions of plants, nutrition, growth, 
movements and reproduction of higher plants. Two or five hours, 
two lectures and three laboratories. Required Second Semester, 
Senior year, Horticulture, elective Second Semester, Senior year, 
Animal Husbandry, Science and Agriculture, and Science. Prere- 
quisite; Botany I. Dr. Pammel. 

Course XII. — Vegetable Cytology and Micro-Technique. — A 
study of the cell and its divisions in lower cryptogams and higher 
plants. The use of reagents and staining, methods of sectioning 



DIVISION OP SCIENCE 305 

and mounting. Three or five hours. One lecture and two or four 
laboratories. Elective Second Semester, Sophomore year, Horti- 
culture, and Second Semester, Junior year, Agronomy, Dairying, 
Animal Husbandry, Science and Agriculture, and Science, and 
Second Semester, Senior year, G. & D. S., and Domestic Science. 
Prerequisites; Botany I and III. Mr. Bucnanan. 

Course XIII. — Agrostology. — This course is intended to give 
the student a general idea of some of the more important grasses, 
not only with reference to their botanical position, but also with 
reference to their economic uses, especially meadow and pasture 
grasses; the cereal food products, grasses in medicine, as soil 
binders and for lawn making. Two hours, one lecture and one 
laboratory, elective First Semester, Senior year, in Courses in 
Horticulture, Dairying, Animal Husbandry, Science and Agricul- 
ture, and Science. Prerequisite; Botany I and XV. Dr. Pammel. 

Course XIV. — Seeds and Seed Testing. — The principal agri- 
cultural weed seeds and their detection in commercial seeds, as 
well as the structural characters of the more important com- 
mercial seeds is given. The germinative energy of various seeds 
and such other features as are important in connection with 
seed testing are considered. Two hours, first semester, Senior 
year. Prerequisite; Botany I and III. Dr. Pammel. 

Course XV. — General Systematic Phanerogams. — This course 
consists of lectures and laboratory work on the more important 
orders of flowering plants, especially with reference to the flora 
of North America. Definite systems of classification, Prelinnaean, 
Linnsean, and Post-Linnsean. In the laboratory each student is 
assigned some special group of plants to work up. The synonymy 
of the species of plants studied by him are looked up. Frequent 
excursions are obligatory. Three or five hours, two lectures and 
one or three laboratories. Elective Second Semester, Sophomore 
year, Horticulture, and Second Semester, Junior year, in Dairying, 
Animal Husbandry, and Science, and Second Semester, Senior 
year, G. & D. S., and Domestic Science. Prerequisite; Botany I. 
Dr. Pammel. 

Course XVI. — Poisonous Plants. — The veterinarian is fre- 
quently called on to investigate poisoning. He should therefore 
be familiar with the plants responsible for poisoning live stock. 
In this course the subject is treated from the historical stand- 
point, brief reference to the history of toxicology, auto-intoxica- 
tion, poisoning from ptomaines, toxins and agents responsible 
20 



306 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

for such poisoning. Poisoning by fungi like toadstools, and ergot, 
dwelling on life history of these fungi and the poisons they 
produce. The rusts and smuts as possible causes of disease. The 
higher plants are then taken up in a systematic order, calling 
attention to the poisonous plants in the various orders and means 
for recognizing these plants. Two hours, one lecture and one 
laboratory. Required Second Semester, Freshman year. Veter- 
inary. Prerequisite; Botany IX. Dr. Pammel and Miss Fogel. 

Course XVII. — Advaned Cryptogamic Botany —Ferns. — A 
course is offered in advanced Cryptogamic Botany in which only 
the vascular cryptogams are taken up. In this course particular 
attention will be given to the study of the chief types of ferns in 
this state and in the United States and the general distribution 
of ferns and their development. The ferns are frequently cul- 
tivated and they are objects of interest to every lover of the study 
of the science of Botany. Three hours, one lecture and two lab- 
oratories. Elective First Semester, Junior G. & D. S., and First 
Semester, Senior, Science and Domestic Science. Prerequisite; 
Botany IV. Dr. Pammel. 

Course XVIII. — Botanical Seminar. — There has been organ- 
ized at the College in connection with botanical work, a Botanical 
Seminar. Here reviews of recent literature and topics of general 
interest are considered, each member of the Seminar being as- 
signed a topic to report upon. The subjects are then discussed 
by the members. There are also special lectures upon different 
topics related to botany. Seminar meets once a week during the 
school year. One hour. Elective First or Second Semester. 
Science, G. & D. S., and Domestic Science. 

Course XIX. — Evolution of Plants. — A course of lectures 
dealing with evolution as applied to plants, theories of evolution, 
heredity, origin of plant life, present and past distribution. One 
hour, Senior year. Elective First Semester, Senior year, Horti- 
hour. Elective First Semester, Senior year, Horticulture, Dairy- 
ing, Animal Husbandry, Science and Agriculture, Science, G. & 
D. S., and Domestic Science. Prerequisite; Botany I, II and III. 
Dr. Pammel. 

Course XX. — Botanical Micro-Chemistry. — In this work the 
student becomes familiar with the microscope and its parts and 
the structure of cells, and the substances contained therein, spe- 
cial attention being given to micro-chemistry. This work covers 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 307 

essentially the work given in Zimmermann's Botanical Micro- 
Technique. 

Course XXI. — Fermentation or Zymotechnique. — In this 
course special attention is given to the organisms of fermenta- 
tion, their morphology and biology. Under this head is taken 
up a discussion of the subjects of the making of vinegar, lactic 
acid fermentation, Kephir organisms, the making of bread, slimy 
fermentations and butyric acid fermentations, in short, the sub- 
jects of fermentation such as are connected with the technical 
problems of the household and the factory. Two hours, one lec- 
ture and one laboratory. Required Second Semester, Junior year. 
Domestic Science, and elective Second Semester, Junior year, G. 
& D. S., Mr. Buchanan. 

POST GRADUATE COURSES. 

Course XXI !. — Systematic Botany. — The Department offers 
unusual facilities for doing systematic work, the collection being 
large and well supplied with type material in the way of Phanero- 
gams from the Rocky Mountains and Pacific coast. The student 
taking this course should be sufficiently familiar with the general 
relations of the flowering plants to be able to take up special or- 
ders. The student should be familiar with the modern systems of 
classification, especially those of Engler and Prantl and Bentham 
and Hooker. Courses are also offered in systematic work among 
the lower plants, the College having an unusually good collection 
in certain orders, especially the economic, such as Uredinesee and 
UstilagineaB. Major or minor work. 

Course XXI N. — Advanced Morphology. — In this course the 
comparative anatomy of phanerogams as well as cryptogams is 
taken up, the student consulting such works as Gray, Engler, 
Eichler and DeBary. Minor work. 

Course XXIV. — Advanced Economic Botany. — The course in 
Economic Botany is offered as a post-graduate minor, and the 
student will take up such topics as the adulteration of foods, 
seeds, the germination of plants, the vitality of seeds, in fact any 
subject especially pertaining to agriculture, horticulture and for- 
estry. Minor work. 

Course XXV. — Advanced Mycology. — The subject of Mycol- 
ogy is offered in post-graduate work, the student taking up the 
study of fungous diseases of cultivated and wild plants. Also 
work on the life history of fungi. Major or minor work. 



308 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XXVI.— Advanced Bacteriology. — The student is ex- 
pected to take up such subjects as sewage pollution of waters, the 
examination of potable waters, the diseases of plants or fermen- 
tations. This course will not be given unless the prerequisite 
courses in Bacteriology have been taken. Minor or major work. 

Course XXVII. — Advanced Cytology. — An advanced post grad- 
uate course in Cytology is offered. The student takes up work 
in advance of that given in Course XII., especial attention being 
given to developmental studies of higher plants and some of the 
cryptogams. This study can be taken as a major only in post- 
graduate work. 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY. 

HENRY E. SUMMERS, PROFESSOR. 

JOSEPH E. GUTHRIE, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

C. E. BARTHOLOMEW, ASSISTANT. 

Equipment. — The laboratory is well supplied with the usual 
apparatus, including compound and dissecting microscopes, cam- 
era-lucidas, microtomes, incubators, paraffin baths, aquaria, etc. 
In the way of illustrative material, in addition to the general 
museum and the entomological collections described below, there 
is a large series of charts, a set of wax embryological models, 
lantern slides, mounted microscopic slides, disarticulated and 
articulated skeletons, and alcoholic preparations. 

The general museum consists of specimens selected with 
great care to show the variation of structure found in the various 
branches, classes and minor divisions of the animal kingdom. 
Porifera, coelenterata, vermes, echinodermata, arthropoda, mol- 
lusca and veterbrata are all amply represented by actual speci- 
mens and Blaschka glass models. It is especially rich, however, in 
representative birds and mammals. In addition to a good series 
of skeletons, there are mounted skins of over four hundred, and 
eggs of three hundred species of birds and over ninety mounted 
skins of mammals, the latter including such rare or peculiar 
forms as the echidna, ornithorhynchus, great kangaroo, kaola. 
wombat, sloth, great ant-eater, armadillo, manatee, peccary, 
camel, antelope, bison, Rocky Mountain goat and sheep, elk, tapir, 
porcupine, beaver, fur seal, hedgehog, lemur and monkey. 

The collection of insects is very large, embracing about sixty 
thousand mounted specimens, including a large number of types. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 309 

It includes the Van Duzee collection of Hemiptera, from Buffalo, 
New York, including the types of the numeroms species described 
by him. There is also a large series of microscopic forms on 
slides, and a large amount of material illustrating life histories, 
especially of injurious insects. 

The work in Zoology is designed, first, to give a knowledge 
of those biological laws, together with the data necessary for 
their thorough comprehension, which is today regarded as an 
essential part of a liberal education; secondly, to furnish the 
requisite theoretical basis for ah intelligent study of certain 
practical branches of stock breeding, dairying, human and veter- 
inary medicine, and economic entomology, which depend directly 
upon zoological principles; and, thirdly, to impart a knowledge 
of the facts and methods of investigation in the last of these 
practical subjects, namely, economic entomology. 

Course I. — Introductory Entomology. — This course is de« 
signed as an introduction to all the other work in the department. 
Insects are used as convenient forms in giving a training in 
accurate observation, and in the methods of systematic and field 
zoology. Some training is also obtained in the use of the micro- 
scope. The work begins with a thorough study of the structure 
of the grasshopper and beetle, followed by the collection of in- 
sects and their classification. The life histories of certain selected 
forms are also traced. The lectures deal chiefly with those facts 
in the physiology and life history of insects that will best serve 
as a foundation for a knowledge of the general laws of animal life. 
One lecture and one laboratory exercise per week. Second Semes- 
ter, Freshman year. 

Course II. — Vertebrate Zoology. — A somewhat thorough study 
of the anatomy of the shark serves as an introduction to the 
methods of gross dissection. A comparison of the perch with 
the shark gives an opportunity to impart some knowledge of 
homology. Following this a similar comparison is made of the 
anatomy of the necturus and the frog, including a small amount 
of elementary histology, which gives some practice in the use of 
the microscope. An outline of the development of the frog lays 
a foundation for the more extended study of vertebrate embry- 
ology in Course V. This is followed by a briefer study of other 
types, as amphioxus, lamprey, fish, turtle, bird and mammal. 
Throughout this course the relation of structure to function is 
kept constantly in view, the end being to give a conception of 



310 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

each animal as a living being. Three lectures and two laboratory- 
exercises per week in the Science courses and three lectures and 
one laboratory exercise per week in the Agricultural and Veterin- 
ary courses. First Semester, Sophomore year. Prerequisite; 
Zoology I . 

Course 111. — Invertebrate Zoology. — A continuation of the 
preceding course, devoted to the morphology, physiology, and 
especially the ecology of selected types of the more important 
groups of invertebrates, including the amoeba, hydra, earth worm, 
crawfish, and mussel. Especial attention is devoted to the Pn> 
tozoa, a very full discussion being given in the lectures of the 
fundamental forms in which animal functions are exhibited in 
this group. Questions of phylogeny are quite fully discussed, 
thus laying a foundation for Course VI. Three lectures and two 
laboratory exercises per week in the Science courses and three 
lectures and one laboratory exercise per week in the Agricultural 
course. Second Semester, Sophomore year. Prerequisite; Zoolo- 
gy II. 

Course IV. — Applied Entomology. — A study of the structure, 
habits, life-histories and classification of insects with especial 
reference to economic species; designed to give to Agricultural 
students, especially those interested in horticulture, a knowledge 
of the methods of combating injurious species. The course also 
serves as a foundation for -independent investigation in Applied 
Entomology. Two lectures and three laboratory exercises per 
week. First Semester, Junior year. Prerequisite; Zoology I. 

Course V. — Embryology. — The laboratory work is devoted to 
a study of the development of the frog and of the chick from 
preparations made largely by the student, supplemented by 
others furnished for comparison by the instructor. The methods 
of making reconstructions from sereal sections may be learned. 
In the lectures the general principles of development are dis- 
cussed, beginning with the structure of the germ cells, matura- 
tion, fertilization, and tracing the modifications of cleavage and 
gastrulation found in the different classes of vertebrates. Two 
lectures and one to three laboratory exercises per week. First 
Semester, Junior year. Prerequisite; Zoology II. 

Course VI. — Evolution of Animals. — A discussion of the prob- 
lems and factors of organic evolution, heredity, variation, origin 
and distribution of life, etc. One lecture per week. Second Se- 
mester, Senior year. Prerequisites; Zoology II. and HI. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 311 

Course VII. — Comparative Anatomy. — Advanced work on the 
comparative anatomy of the chief systems of organs of verte- 
brates, designed especially to give an understanding of mam- 
malian morphology as derived from that of the lower vertebrates. 
Second Semester, Junior year. Three lectures and two labora- 
tory periods per week. Prerequisites; Zoology n, III and V. 

Course VIII. — Animal Parasites. — A course of lectures upon 
the more injurious parasites of domestic animals. Intended pri- 
marily for students of Veterinary Medicine. Second Semester, 
Junior year. Two lectures per week. Prerequisite; Zoology n. 

Course IX. — Advanced Entomology. — Special individual lab- 
oratory work in continuation of Course IV., intended for those 
who expect to engage in the branches of agriculture, as for 
example horticulture, in which an especially thorough knowledge 
of insects is necessary, and for those who expect to pursue ento- 
mology as a profession. The exact nature of the work in each 
case will dep&ad upon the ability and special object of the 
student. Three to five laboratory exercises per week. First or 
Second Semester, Junior or Senior year. Prerequisites; Zoology 
IV. 

Course X. — Morphology. — Special individual work in contin- 
uation of Courses II., III., V. and VII., designed especially for 
those who expect to become teachers and investigators in zoology 
and who are writing their thesis in this department. The work 
will be given a leaning toward general vertebrate or invertebrate 
morphology, embryology or taxonomy depending upon the in- 
clination of the student. Three to five hours per week, mainly 
laboratory. First or Second Semester, Senior year. Prerequisite; 
Zoology V. and VII. 

Course XI. — Neurology. — A course in the comparative mor- 
phology of the vertebrate nervous system, with especial attention 
to the physiological anatomy of the human brain. Two lectures 
and one to three laboratory exercises per week. First Semester, 
Senior year. Prerequisite; Zoology II, III and V. 

Course XII. — Human Physiology. — A course of lectures, with 
demonstrations and laboratory work, on the chief functions of 
the human body, and on the laws of health. The physiology and 
hygiene proper are preceded by a study of mammalian anatomy, 
including histology. Three lectures and two laboratory exercises 
per week. Prerequisite; Zoology II and III and Chemistry XXII, 
XXIV and IX or H, V and IX. 



312 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course XIII. — Human Physiology. — A continuation of Course 
XII. Three lectures and two laboratory exercises per week. Pre- 
requisite; Zoology XII. 

In addition to the above, special courses will be laid out for 
students intending to write a thesis in zoology, and also for 
graduate students in continuation of the lines of work that they 
pursued as under-graduaes. Special facilities will be offered 
such students for research work. No one will be permitted to 
write a thesis in this department who has not completed by the 
end of the Junior year, work in the line in whic hhe wishes to 
carry on his thesis investigation at least up to and including 
either Course VII or Courses III and IX, or Courses XII and XIII, 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY. 

SAMUEL WALKER BEYER. PROFESSOR. 
I. A. WILLIAMS, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

The work of the department is carried on by means of reci* 
tations, lectures, conferences, laboratory work and numerous 
field excursions. The student is not only afforded an opportunity 
to gain some familiarity with the principles and theories dis- 
cussed in the leading text-books, but is encouraged to test the 
theories and verify the principles discussed in the class room. 
Field excursions, with carefully written reports thereon are 
required in all of the courses in Geology. 

Equipment. 

The Department of Geology shares quarters with the Depart- 
ment of Mining Engineering in Engineering Hall and it is un- 
necessary to repeat the description of rooms given on a preceding 
page. The working equipment consists of museum materials, 
field and laboratory instruments. 

The museum contains carefully selected series of fossils, 
minerals, rock and ores; all available for study purposes. Among 
the more important collections in Geology and Mineralogy are: 
The educational series of rocks, collected by the United States 
Geological Survey; the Smithsonian collection of rocks and min- 
erals; the Rohn, Hodson and Young collections of rocks and ores 
from the Lake Superior region; the English mineral collection* 
containing 200 specimens and about 150 species; the Baltimore 
series of more than 200 specimens of rocks and minerals typical 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 313 

of the petrographic province of Baltimore ; the Cushing collection 
from Clinton County, New York; and a considerable amount of 
material to illustrate the physical features of rocks and minerals. 

In paleontology, the Calvin collection of paleozoic fossils; a 
large collection of Coastal Plain fossils, principally from the Cre- 
taceous of New Jersey, the Eocene of Alabama and Maryland, 
and the Miocene of Maryland and Virginia; the Permo-Carbon- 
iferous series from Kansas and Russia; and the coal plants of 
Iowa, Illinois and Pennsylvania are the most important. 

In Applied Geology the department possesses comprehensive 
series of lead and zinc ores with their characteristic gangue 
minerals from Joplin, Missouri, and from the Iowa-Wisconsin 
area; copper and iron from the Lake Superior region and from 
the celebrated localities in the Ural mountains; copper, manga- 
nese and silver from Butte, Montana; lead, silver and gold from 
Colorado, Nevada and California. 

Aside from the collections enumerated, Dr. H. Foster Bain, 
formerly of the Iowa Geological Survey, has kindly loaned to the 
department his extensive private collection of rocks and min- 
erals; and the Le Grand Quarry Company generously donated a 
splendid series of building blocks from their quarries which ex- 
hibit the various styles of stone dressing. 

The laboratory is supplied with four Bausch and Lomb petro- 
graphical microscopes; one Fuess, medium model, latest pattern 
petrographical microscope. All of the instruments are well sup- 
plied with accessories; one Ward mineral dresser, one hand 
goniometer; one set Preston's celluloid crystal models; one set 
Krantz selected wood models exhibiting complicated forms; the 
Krantz collection of 120 thin sections of the common rock-form- 
ing minerals selected and arranged according to Rosenbusch, the 
collection selected to show the various representative characters 
of minerals and rocks ; one section slicing machine, and complete 
apparatus for rock separations by heavy solutions; and is sup- 
plied with apparatus for doing all kinds of photographic work. 
A considerable number of instruments for reconnoissance and 
field work in Geology are owned by the department. 

The lecture equipment comprises a Hitchcock's geological 
may of the United States; one set of Kiepert's physical maps; 
numerous maps and charts of the United States Geological Sur- 
very and of the Mississippi River Commission and an elaborate 
series of lantern slides and photographs. 



314 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Courses in Geology and Mineralogy. 

Eight courses are offered in Geology and Mineralogy. Physio- 
graphy is required in the Divisions of Science and Agriculture; 
Courses II, IV to VII, inclusive, are required of students in Civil 
Mining Engineering; Course III. is elective to students in Civil 
Engineering; Course IX. is specially adapted to students in the 
Division of Agriculture, while Courses II. to VIII., inclusive, are 
elective to all students in the Divisions of Agriculture and 
Science. 

Course I. — Physiography. — First Semester, Freshman year, 
three hours per week; serves as an introduction to the Science 
of Geology. The first half of the Semester is devoted to the study 
of the agents which have to do with modifying the earth's 
crust, while the resultant earth features receive careful consider- 
ation during the second half of the Semester. Davis' or Tarr's 
Elements of Physical Geography is the text-hook used. Required 
in the Divisions of Science, in the courses of Agronomy and 
Horticulture of the Division of Agriculture and two years' courses 
in Mining Engineering and Clay Working. 

Course II. — General Geology. — Five hours per week first half 
year. This course embraces a discussion of the principles which 
form the ground work of the science. The first ten weeks are 
devoted to dynamic and structural geology and the last six to 
stratigraphic and historical geology. The student is required to 
make several excursions to points of geological interest to verify 
the more salient facts discussed in the class room. 

Prerequisites. — The elementary courses in physics, chemistry 
and zoology. Required of students in Mining Engineering; elec- 
tive in the divisions of Agriculture and Science. 

Course III. — Engineering Geology. — The Semester is devoted 
to a discussion of the fundamental principles of dynamical and 
structural geology, and a study of the common minerals and 
rocks, especially those important in structural materials. The 
course is given in the Second Semester and counts four hours 
per week. Prerequisites the same as for Course II. 

Course IV. — Advanced Geology. — Five hours per week, Sec- 
ond Semester, Senior year. The nature, mode of occurrence and 
origin of the minerals and rocks which constitute the earth's 
crust are considered in some detail during the first half of the 
Semester, while rock alteration as involved in metamorphism 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 315 

and weathering receives special attention during the second half. 
Excursions are continued as in II, and students are encouraged 
to familiarize themselves with the methods employed in doing 
research work and to make independent observations. 

Prerequisites. — Course II. Open to students in the divisions 
of Agriculture and Science. 

Course V. — Economic Geology. — 'Three hours per week, Sec- 
ond Semester, Senior year. This course embraces a discussion 
of the general features and formation of ore bodies, followed by 
a description of the distribution and the occurrence of coal and 
the more important hydro-carbons, building stones, potable wa- 
ters, salines and other products of economic importance. 

Prerequisites. — Courses II, VI and VII. Required of students 
In Mining Engineering. 

Course VI. — Mineralogy. — Two hours class room and one 
hour laboratory, second half, Junior year. This course is intend- 
ed to give the student a clear idea of the morphological and 
physical properties of crystalline substances. 

Prerequisites. — Elementary courses in physics, chemistry and 
mathematics. Required in the Mining Engineering course and 
optional in the Division of Science. 

Course VII. — Descriptive and Determinative Mineralogy. — 
Two hours' class room and one hour laboratory in the First 
Semester, Senior year. This semester's work is devoted to the 
study of the more important mineral species, their proeprties, 
uses, distribution and methods of determination. Required in 
the Mining Engineering course and elective in the Division of 
Science. 

Course VIM. — Petrography. — Two hours per week during the 
Second Semester, Senior year, and is essentially a laboratory 
course. It embraces a short course in the microscopic study of 
rocks. 

Prerequisites. — Courses VI and VII. Required of students in 
the Mining Engineering course. 

Course IX. — Agricultural Geology. — Open to students in the 
Division of Agriculture, Second Semester, Sophomore year, and 
counts three hours. The origin, mineralogy and physiography of 
soils with attendant problems are treated as fully as the time 
will permit. 



316 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC SCIENCE. 

Economic Science has become a well recognized part of 
almost all scientific and technical education, because it has made 
itself useful in investigating and interpreting the material phen- 
omena and facts of every-day life. Economic theory is taught as 
the generalized truth of economic life; inductive methods are 
given first place, deduction being used with caution. It is the 
plan and expectation to make the department much more vitally 
useful to the technical departments of the school in the near 
future. 

Course I. — Outlines of Economics. — This course is begun by a 
brief study of Industrial History using Cheyney's "Industrial 
History of England" as the text. The principles of economics 
are then presented with Seager's "Introduction to Economics" as 
the basis. In the spring term a sketch of the Industrial History 
of the U. S. is presented in lectures and class reports. Both 
semesters. Required of M. E. and E. E. students First Semester, 
Junior year, C. E. Second Semester, Junior year; elective for 
Agricultural, Domestic Science, General and Domestic Science, 
and Science students. Five hours. 

Course II. — History of Political Economy. — Given as a lecture 
course, supplemented by class reports. Omitted in 1904-5. Elec- 
tive for those who have had Course I. Two hours, First Semester. 

Course III. — Economic Problems. — In this course Socialism 
is studied during the first half of the Semester, Ely's "Socialism 
and Social Reform," Ely's "French and German Socialism," 
Hilquit's "History of Socialism in the United States," etc., are 
used to acquaint the student with the spirit and growth of 
Socialism. In the second half of the semester attention is given 
to monopolies and trusts. Elective for those who have had 
Course I. First Semester, three hours. 

Course IV. — Money and Banking. — Kinley's "Money," used 
as the text. Supplementary work by reading, reports, and lec- 
tures. Elective for those who have had Course I. Second 
Semester, two hours. 

Course V. — Finance. — Adams's "Science of Finance," the text. 
Elective for those who have had Course I. Second Semester, 
three hours. 

Course VI. — Industrial History of the U. S. — Lectures and 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 317 

class reports. Elective for those who have had Course I. Second 
Semester, two hours. 

Course VII. — American Labor. — There is no more vital ques- 
tion than the labor question and in this course an attempt is 
made to introduce the student to the problems and literature of 
the subject. Lectures and class reports. Elective for those who 
have had Course I. First Semester, two hours. 
WHERE and WHAT is it. 



DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

GEOBGETTA WITTEB, PROFESSOR. 

RUTH MORRISON AND FRANCES WILLIAMS, INSTRUCTORS. 

FLORA PADDOCK, LABORATORY ASSISTANT. 

The widespread interest in Domestic Science springs large- 
ly from the increasing attention accorded to all social problems. 
The importance of the home as a social factor is paramount; and 
the application of science and of the scientific method to house- 
hold management is coming to be regarded as a necessity. It is 
not surprising therefore that the study of the home, its function, 
its administration, its sanitary conditions, the preparation of 
foods, and a score of kindred topics should find place in the 
courses of instruction in colleges and universities. The study of 
Domestic Science is profitable not only because of its practical 
worth, but because of its educative value. Many sciences find 
direct application in the operations of housekeeping; it is conse- 
quently the aim of this department to present this home-study in 
such a way as to apply the knowledge gained in related and 
associated sciences. This study seeks at every point the health, 
convenience and comfort of the members of the household, and 
by its utility to add to the value of the well kept home. 

Domestic Science Hall adjoins Margaret Hall and includes 
the general office, the sewing-room, fitting-room, bed-room, labora- 
tory kitchen, dining-room, and store-rooms. 

The methods of instruction embrace the lecture system, text- 
book study, laboratory practice, demonstration lessons, class 
discussions, presentation of topics on assigned subjects by 
individual members of the class, and expeditions for observation 
and criticism. By a judicious combining of theory and practice, 
science and art, the student gains a thorough understanding of 



318 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

the underlying principles of Domestic Economy and at the same 
time acquires skill and deftness in execution. Upon completing 
a systematic course in this department a young woman is pre- 
pared to conduct her home successfully and with that ease which 
comes only through knowledge and experience. 

The work offered in Domestic Economy does not constitute 
a special and separate course of study, but is one of the several 
lines included in the general College course for all women stu- 
dents and subject to the usual regulations concerning entrance 
requirements, classification, examinations, and class records. 

Materials, tools and utensils for laboratory work are furnish- 
ed by the department and for the use of these students in the 
sewing classes pay a fee of one dollar each term; those in cook- 
ing, three, four and five dollars. 

Four hours each week are devoted to recitation and practice 
in each of the several subjects included in Domestic Economy, 
one of which subjects is offered each term of the four years. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 

D. E. II. — Foods. — This course familiarizes the student with 
the processes of cooking and with the principles underlying the 
cooking of proteids, carbohydrates and fats. The various food 
stuffs are taken up in the order of their simplicity of prepara- 
tion. The pupil prepares many nourishing and appetizing dishes, 
and is trained at the same time in the points of accuracy, order 
and economy and in the general care of the kitchen and its 
utensils. 

The lectures in this Course deal with the various foods 
prepared in the laboratory, and cover the following general top- 
ics: Chemical composition, nutritive value, function in the body, 
digestibility and cost. In connection with this a study is made of 
the most wholesome and scientific method of preparing the food 
under discussion. First Semester, Junior year, two hours. Fee 
three dollars. 

D. E. V. — A continuation of Course II. Second Semester, 
Junior year. Two hours. Fee four dollars. 

D. E. VIII. — Laundry Work. — This course covers One Se- 
mester. The exposition of the scientific principles involved in 
the various processes is followed by actual work in the laundry. 
Soaps, washing fluids, bleaching powders, bluings and starches 
are discussed in their scientific and practical relations to laundry 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 319 

work. Junior year, First Semester. One hour. Fee two dollars. 

D. E. XVI. — Home Sanitation. — A study of the location and 
surroundings of the house, its plan, furnishing and care from 
the sanitary standpoint. Plumbing and drainage, and disposal 
of household wastes; heating, lighting and ventilation; water 
supply. Text-book, Richards & Talbot's "Home Sanitation." 
Junior year, First Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXV. — Geography of Foods. — A study of the produc- 
tion, transportation, preparation, adulteration and consumption 
of foods, also their market value as compared with their food 
value. Junior year, First Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXVI. — Geography of Foods. — A continuation of 
Course XXV. Junior year, Second Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXII. — Sickroom Cookery and Home Nursing. — The 
furnishing, warming and ventilating of the sick-room. Bathing, 
dressing and administering food and medicine to patients. Prac- 
tical bandaging and bed making, lifting and caring for helpless 
patients. Preparation and application of poultices. Junior year, 
Second Semester. One hour. Fee three dollars. 

D. E. XXIII. — Home Management. — This course includes 
instruction in the following subjects: Care of dining-room 
and pantry; care of cut glass, silver and cutlery; serving of 
breakfast, luncheon and dinner; buying of supplies, food as an 
economic factor, dietaries and the administration of the home. 
Junior year, Second Semester. One hour. Fee five dollars. 

D. E. XX. — Advanced Cookery. — The application of heat 
to food materials. Food principles and the fundamental laws 
of cookery. The practical application of the chemistry of cook- 
ery. Experiments to determine the relative value of different 
methods of work, and the effect of varying proportions of ma- 
terials. Senior year, Fall Semester. One hour. Fee five dollars. 

D. E. XXI. — A Course in Demonstration Work. — Senior year, 
Second Semester. One hour. Fee five dollars. 

D. E. IX. — Theory of Teaching Domestic Science. — A study 
of how Domestic Science should be presented to classes, plan- 
ning of lessons and a study of the school kitchen. Senior year, 
First Semester. One hour. Fee one dollar. 

D. E. X. — Practice Teaching. — Each girl will have the actual 
experience of teaching and applying knowledge gained in D. E. 
IX. Senior year, Second Semester. One hour. Fee one dollar. 

D. E. XXIV. — Dietaries. — The nature, nutritive constituents 



320 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and relative values of foods. Composition of common food ma- 
terials. Senior year, First Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXVII. — Household Accounts. — A practical course in 
single-entry bookkeeping, involving the use of day book, ledger, 
cash book and bill book. Students are required to make out 
bills and receipts, to use check-book and pass-books. This prac- 
tical work is supplemented with lectures on business cutoms, 
notes, drafts, letters of credit, and banking. Senior year, First 
Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXX. — Seminar. — A study of the history of Domestic 
Science. The course as offered in our state and training schools, 
its value to the people of Iowa, and a study of the best way of 
presenting this work. Senior year, Second Semester. One hour. 

D. E. XXVIII. — Chafing Dish Cookery. — Showing how our 
much abused chafing dish may become an invaluable utensil in 
every household. One hour. Offered to girls only. Senior year, 
Second Semester. Fee three dollars. 

From January 2 to 14, 1906, there will be offered, to the 
women of Iowa a short course in Domestic Science. 

The work will consist of a series of lectures on subjects such 
as, What Domestic Science Should Mean to the Women of Iowa, 
Its Value in Our Public Schools, Home Sanitation, Home Nursing, 
A Properly Balanced Ration, Drinking Water and Ice Supplies. 
Each day there will be demonstrations showing how plain food 
may be well cooked and daintily served. 

DOMESTIC ART. 

D. E. I. — The first Semester's work in Domestic Art gives the 
student a practical knowledge of all varieties of stitches in 
hand sewing. Each girl makes for herself a set of models, 
including the various stitches, seams, hems, fastenings, plackets, 
gussets, also patching, darning, lace and embroidery matching 
and glove mending. Lectures are given upon the use of each 
model, and a study is made of the various fibers, their growth 
and process of manufacture. Freshman year, First Semester. 
Two hours. Fee one dollar. 

D. E. IV. — Garment Work. — The work in garment-making is 
open to young women who have completed D. E. I. Each stu- 
dent selects material for underwear, and plans, cuts, fits and 
finishes the underwear for herself, under the supervision of the 
instructor in charge. The lecture work is a continuation of D. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 321 

E. I and deals with the manufacture of fabrics and the evolution 
of textile machinery. The history of tapestry and of rug man- 
ufacture is taken up, with the making of miniature looms of 
early designs. Freshman year, Second Semester. Two hours. 
Fee one dollar. 

D. E. VI. — This course furnishes knowledge of the princi- 
ples of shirt-waist making. The student purchases, designs, 
drafts, and makes two unlined shirt-waists. One cotton, the 
other silk. The lectures of this course consider clothing from 
the artistic, hygienic and philosophic standpoints. The properties 
and values of textile materials are studied and in connection 
with this the work of the Consumers' League and Sweat Shops. 
Junior year, First Semester. Two hours. Fee one dollar. 

D. E. VII. — Drafting and Dressmaking. — Continuation of 
Course VI. Each young woman designs, drafts and makes for 
herself an unlined shirt-waist suit. Instruction is offered in 
Raffia work, woven and sewed basketry. In this course the lec- 
tures treat of Historic Costume. Sophomore year, Second Se- 
mester. Two hours. Fee one dollar. 

Course XI. — History of Art. — This course treats especially 
the subjects of Architecture and Sculpture. The organic and 
typical forms of architecture are studied with relation to their 
origin, character and development, and their particular adapta- 
tion to the existing conditions as to building materials and the 
needs and ideals of men. Sculpture is studied for its own per- 
fection of beauty and grace and its use as an adjunct of archi- 
tecture. Senior year, First Semester. Two hours. 

Course XII. — Continuation of Course XI with Painting as the 
principal subject where history is conceived as a sequent evolu- 
tion of races and epochs, unbroken in continuity, the history of 
art, dealing as it does, with the visible relics of the past; not only 
with buildings, statutes and paintings, but with fabrics, utensils, 
furniture, indeed all the accessories of daily living, takes rank 
as a study of first importance. It is not more a history of the 
arts of design than a history of civilization. In both these 
courses Goodyear is used as a text, supplemented by lectures 
and library work. The work is illustrated by photographs of 
architecture, sculpture and painting. Senior year, Second Se- 
mester. Two hours. 

Course XIII. — Home Decoration. — In this course no text is 

used but the principles of construction, ornamentation and color 
21 



322 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



harmony are applied to furnishings and utensils and to the treat- 
ment of walls, floors and ceilings by means of lectures and speci- 
mens of textiles, wall papers, pottery, fine glass and silver. 
Senior year, Second Semester. One hour. 

SCIENCE COURSE. 

Domestic Science Work. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. I. — Plain Sewing. — 1 

rec, 1 lab., 2 hours. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. IV.— Garment Work.— 

1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours. Must 
be preceded by D. E. I. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. VI. — Drafting & Dress- 
making. — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours. 
Must be preceded by D. E. I. 
and IV. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. VII. — Dressmaking — 
Basketry. — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours 
Must be preceded by D. E. I, 
IV and VI. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. II. — Foods. — 1 rec, 
lab., 2 hours. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. V. — Foods (Advanced 
Course). — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours. 
Must be preceded by D. E. II. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. VIM.— Laundry Work. 
D. E. XX.— Adv. Cookery.— 

Must be preceded by D. E. II 
and V. 1 lab., each; 1 hour 
credit, (each). 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. XXI.— Adv. Cookery. 
D. E. XXIII.— Home Manage- 
ment. 

D. E. XXII.— Home Nursing. 

— Each 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 
Must be preceded by D. E. II, 
V and XX. 



All work elective in Science course. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



323 



GENERAL AND DOMESTIC SCIENCE COURSE. 

Domestic Science Work. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIEST SEMESTER. 

D. E. I. — Plain Sewing (re- 
quired). — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours 
credit. 



SECOND SEMESTEB. 

D. E. IV— Garment Work (re- 
quired). — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours 
credit. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. T. VI.— Drafting & Dress- 
making (required). — 1 rec, 1 
lab., 2 hours credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. VII. — Dressmaking — 
Basketry (required). — 1 rec, 1 

lab., 2 hours credit. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. II. — Foods (required). 
— 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours credit. 
(Elective) 

D. E. VIII.— Laundry Work. 
— 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXV.— Geography of 
Foods. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XVI.— Home Sanita- 
tion. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. V. — Foods (Advanced 
Course) (required). — 1 rec, 1 
lab., 2 hours credit. 
(Elective) 

D. E. XXII.— Home Nursing. 
— 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXVI.— Geography of 
Foods. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. XX— Adv. Cookery (re- 
quired). — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXIV.— Dietaries (re- 
quired). — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 
(Elective) 

D. E. XXVII.— Household 
Accounts. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit 

D. E. XI.— History of Art.— 
2 rec, 2 hours credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. XXI— Adv. Cookery (re- 
quired). — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXIII.— Home Manage- 
ment (required). — 1 lab., 1 hour 
credit. 

(Elective) 

D. E. XII.— History of Art.— 
2 rec, 2 hours credit. 

D. E. XIII. — Home Decora- 
tion. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXX — Seminar. — 1 hour 
credit. 

D. E. XXVIII.— Chafing Dish 
Cookery. — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 



324 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



DOMESTIC SCIENCE COURSE. 

Domestic Science Work. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. I. — Plain Sewing. — 1 
rec, 1 lab., 2 hours credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. IV.— Garment Work.— 

1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours credit. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. VI.— Drafting and 
Dressmaking. — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 
hours credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER- 

D. E. VII. — Dressmaking. — 1 

rec, 1 lab., 2 hours credit. 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D, E. II. — Foods. — 1 rec, 1 
lab., 2 hours credit. 

D. E. VIM.— Laundry Work. 
— 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XVI.— Home Sanita- 
tion. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXV. — Geography of 
Foods. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit, 
credit. 

(Elective) 

Home and Market Garden- 
ing. — Hort. I, 2 hours. 

Landscape Gardening — Hort. 
VIII, 2 hours. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. V. — Foods (Advanced 
Work). — 1 rec, 1 lab., 2 hours 
credit. 

D. E. XXII. — Home Nursing. 
— 1 rec, or lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXIII. — Home Manage- 
ment. — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E, XXVI. — Geography of 
Foods. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 
(Elective) 

Elementary Forestry. — HorL 
XIV., 3 hours. 



SENIOR YEAR. 



FIRST SEMESTER. 

D. E. XX.— Adv. Cookery — 

1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. IX. — Theory of Teach- 
ing Domestic Science. — 1 rec, 

1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXIV.— Dietaries. — 1 
rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXVII.— Household 
Accounts. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XI.— History of Art.— 

2 rec, 2 hours credit. 



SECOND SEMESTER. 

D. E. XXI. — Demonstration 
Work. — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. X. — Practice Teaching. 
— 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XII.— History of Art.— 
2 rec, 2 hours credit. 

D. E. XIII. — Home Decora- 
tion. — 1 rec, 1 hour credit. 

D. E. XXX — Seminar. — 1 hour 
credit. 

(Elective) 

D. E. XXVIII.— Chafing Dish 
Cookery. — 1 lab., 1 hour credit. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 325 

DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY. 

OBANGE HOWARD CESSNA, PROFESSOR. 

Course I. — Psychology. — An optional course of elements and 
outlines of Psychology is afforded the First Semester of the Sen- 
ior year to the students of all the College courses. A standard 
text is used and supplemented by lectures and laboratory work. 

Course II. — Ethics. — An optional course in Ethics is afforded 
the Second Semester of the Senior year to the students of all the 
college courses. Several standard text-books of Ethics are em- 
ployed and supplemented by libraray work and lectures. All 
callings and pursuits of life are based upon some element of 
moral obligation. It is the purpose of this instruction in Ethics 
to give the student a comprehensive acquaintance with the 
principles and the duties of a faithful life and good citizenship. 

DEPARTMENT OF LITERATURE AND RHETORIC. 

ALVIN B. NOBLE, PROFESSOR, 

MISS LARRABEE AND MISS MACLEAN, ASSISTANT PROFESSORS. 

MISS REED, MISS THOBURN, MISS WHITE, MISS ABEL, MISS MOORE, AND 

MISS TOMPKINS, INSTRUCTORS. 

In the courses in English two ends are sought, utility and 
culture. Utility predominates in the first years and culture in 
the last, though there is hardly a recitation but contains some- 
thing of both. 

So long as man communicates his thoughts and feelings to 
his fellows, so long will language have a practical value. The 
man who speaks in a bungling manner, only half succeeds in 
communicating his thoughts to others. If they catch his real 
meaning they do it by a happy inference of their own as to what 
he meant to say. But no man can afford — certainly no college 
man can afford — to depend on others to correct his own faulty 
speech. If he uses a wrong word, arranges the parts of the 
sentence improperly, gives some part an undue emphasis, or fails 
to indicate clearly the bearing of one sentence upon another, his 
language does not truly present his thought, and the world may 
profit little from his attempt to state it. The more valuable his 
thought, the greater his need for a clear and effective use of 
language. 

If the student has mastered grammar and rhetoric, that is 



326 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

if he has been trained to apply the principles gone over, his 
speech should be free from errors and inaccuracies of expression. 
More than this: if he has been directed to the study of good 
models, if he has been taught not merely to correct what is 
faulty, but also — and this is far more important — to appreciate 
what is excellent in diction, in sentence structure, in the develop- 
ment of paragraphs and of whole compositions — if he has been 
made to feel the increased utility, the beauty, and the power of 
language as used by the masters of expression, he will not be 
content to use language that has only the negative merit of being 
without faults, but will press on to attain a style enriched by 
the presence of real excellence, a positive quality. Such language 
is not simply clear and accurate, it is pleasing and powerful, and 
the man who has acquired such skill in the use of language has 
greatly increased his influence in the world. If he can give his 
valuable thought an adequate expression, his fellows will learn 
the thought from him, and give him honor accordingly; if he 
cannot, they will learn it from one who can state it more clearly 
or more attractively, and the reward is quite as likely to go to 
the man who best states the thought as to the one who first 
discovers it. 

The courses in grammar, rhetoric, and composition are 
devoted primarily to this utilitarian end. The facts and prin- 
ciples of language are studied, not as valuable in themselves, 
but as useful when applied in spoken or written discourse. To 
this end the student is required to write much, always with some 
definite object to be accomplished, and usually with some good 
model before him to inspire him to more earnest effort. When 
once he has learned to draw from his reading suggestions that 
will be helpful in his future compositions, he has found a possi- 
ble utility in everything he studies as literature and has opened 
the door to continual improvement. Moreover, in learning to 
appreciate what is best in the models set before him, he gains 
insensibly something of culture as well as of utility. 

The course in debating is designed as a training toward the 
effective discussion of live topics. Wherever he goes the college 
graduate is expected to have opinions of his own on the topics 
of the day, to be able to state them clearly and forcibly, and, if 
need be, to defend them. To this end he should train himself 
to close analysis of complex problems, to a severe testing of 
every conclusion, his own as well as other people's. Moreover, 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 327 

the public will not wait for him to retire to his study for labored 
preparation. They expect him to be ready when the occasion 
calls, and they have generous rewards for the man who is ready 
— ready to map out a clear-cut line of argument, ready to support 
it with proofs, and able to present it clearly and forcibly in off- 
hand discussion. Such readiness comes only from long-continued 
right thinking and clear-speaking. It is the aim of this course 
to start the student toward this goal. 

In the courses in Literature it is probably true that the cul- 
ture side predominates, yet utility is seldom lacking. The study 
of Literature calls for close observation, correct inference, fine 
discrimination. When the mind is trained to do such work, it 
acquires a power that abides, a power that can be applied to any 
task. Literature deals with the whole range of human expe- 
rience, emotion, activity. In studying Literature, therefore, we 
are required to give some study to the mind and heart of man. 
If such study does not exert an elevating influence, it can only 
be because the reader does not choose the best, or does not 
approach the work in the right spirit. At the very least, it ought 
to give him a deeper insight into human nature, and that is no 
small gain. But Literature is also an art, an art that engages 
the attention of more people, and holds that attention for a 
longer time, than does any other art. In studying it, therefore, 
we are cultivating the aesthetic sense, a part of our nature not 
appealed to by most studies. Best of all, perhaps, it brings us 
into the company of the rarest minds of all times; it gives com- 
mand of the best thought of the best minds; it brings to us the 
"blessed companionship of wise thoughts and right feelings." It 
broadens the mind, quickens the imagination, enlarges the sym- 
pathies, enriches the whole nature. 

COURSES IN ENGLISH. 

Academic Year. 

Course I. — Grammar. — Syntax of good modern prose; copi- 
ous analysis, with emphasis on phrases and clauses as structural 
units of the sentence, and careful study as to their proper posi- 
tion and connection; daily drill in sentence construction, the 
application of what the student has learned from sentence 
analysis; study of the principles of punctuation, with drill in 
applying them; correction of errors in grammar. Study of 



328 IOWA STATE COLLEQE 

language direct, with as little use of text-book as circumstances 
will permit. Designed to give that ready command of the sen- 
tence that shall leave the student free to seek excellence of 
structure without needing to give conscious thought to correct- 
ness. For admission to this course students must pass an 
examination on the eight parts of speech, their subdivisions, 
inflections, and properties, or else present a teacher's certificate 
or a satisfactory grade in a good high school. All courses. 
Belongs properly to the Fall Semester, but is given in the Spring 
Semester also. Five hours. 

Course II. — Elementary Rhetoric and Composition. — Devoted 
largely to the study of the paragraph, with Scott and Denney's 
"Composition-Rhetoric" as text-book. Careful analysis of good 
models, followed by compositions designed to apply the methods 
just analyzed. An essay once a week, with exercises almost 
daily; each student to correct the mistakes he has made. Pre- 
requisite, English I., taken in class or by examination. If a 
student's essays show need of further drill in grammar or 
punctuation, he will be required to make up the deficiency. 
Belongs properly in the Spring Semester, but is given in the 
Fall Semester also. Five hours. 

Course A. — Review of Grammar and Elementary Rhetoric 
and Composition. — A combination of Courses I. and II. De- 
signed for high school graduates and others who show the need 
of a review in these subjects. All courses. Both Semesters. 
Five hours. 

Course IX. — Literature. — A course in English Classics, such 
as are included in the Uniform College Entrance Requirements in 
English. An elementary study of the forms of literature in 
both prose and poetry, and of the principles underlying each. 
Taken up mainly as an incentive to wider and more thoughtful 
reading, and as an approach to a more intelligent and discrim- 
inating appreciation. Prerequisites, English I. and II. Required 
in the Academic year, leading to the courses in Science and in 
Engineering. Both Semesters. Five hours. 

Freshman Year. 

Course III. — Advanced Rhetoric and Composition. — Devoted 
mainly to the planning of essays and the principles involved in 
the different forms of discourse. An essay once a week, with 
frequent exercises in diction and in making plans and outlines. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 329 

Analysis of good prose models. Prerequisite, English II., taken 
in class or by examination, or diploma from a fully accredited 
high school. If a student's essays show imperfect preparation, 
he will be required to make up the deficiency. Required in all 
the four-year courses. Both Semesters. Five hours. 

Course IV. — Composition. — Weekly themes in narration and 
description, based on models read and discussed before the class. 
Prerequisite, English III. Required in all the four-year courses. 
Both Semesters. One hour. 

Sophomore Year. 

Course V. — Composition. — Weekly themes in exposition. 
Prerequisite, the preceding courses in English. Required in all 
the four-year courses. Both semesters. One hour. 

Course VI. — Composition. — Weekly themes and briefs in ar- 
gumentation. Prerequisite, the preceding courses in English. 
Required in all the four-year courses. Sping Semester. One 
hour. 

The aim of the courses in composition is to train the stu- 
dent to express his thought on whatever subject, not only with 
clearness and ease but with some measure of grace, attractive- 
ness, and power. 

Junior Year. 

Courses VII. and VIM. — Debating. — A course in stating and 
denning questions for debate, in making briefs, and in extempor- 
aneous debating; the application of argumentative principles and 
methods to live topics. Elective in all courses for students who 
have completed the preceding courses in English. Course VII. 
in the Fall Semester, Course VIII. in the Spring Semester. One 
hour each. 

COURSES IN LITERATURE. 

Course I. — The English Drama. — Devoted mainly to a study 
of Shakespeare, with a rapid survey, largely by reports and 
informal lectures, of the English Drama before his time, and a 
rapid reading of one or two dramas of subsequent time. In 
Shakespeare three or more plays will be studied carefully and 
one or two others read rapidly. Character analysis and interpre- 
tation, with grouping and contrast. Plot analysis, with stages of 



330 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

complication and resolution. Prerequisites, the courses in Eng- 
glish for the Freshman year. A part of Course V., but may be 
taken independently. Elective in the Agricultural courses and 
the course in the Sciences related to the industries. Fall Semes- 
ter. Three hours. 

Course II. — Epic and Lyric Poetry. — A course in English 
poetry, excluding the drama. Selections from Milton, Pope, 
Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, and Browning. 
Classification of the various forms of poetry. Study of rhythm, 
meter, rhyme, alliteration, figures of speech, melody, harmony, 
etc. Principles of criticisms applicable to the poems studied. 
Prerequisites, the courses in English for the Freshman year. Lit- 
erature I or V, though not strictly necessary, will yet be of great 
help. Required in the General and Domestic Science Courses in 
the Sophomore year; elective in the Agricultural Courses, and in 
the Course in the Sciences related to the Industries, in the 
Junior year. Spring Semester. Five hours. 

Course III. — 'Novel and Romance. — A course in the novel and 
romance from the eighteenth century to the present time. Dif- 
ferences between the two forms. Comparison to the drama. 
Plot and character analysis. Outline for systematic study. Pre- 
requisites, the courses in English through the Freshman and 
Sophomore years; should also be preceded by Course VI, The 
Short Story. Elective in the Agricultural Courses, the Course in 
the Sciences related to the Industries, and the Course in General 
and Domestic Science. Spring Semester, Junior or Senior year. 
Three hours. 

Course IV. — American Literature. — A study of our best poets 
and essayists. Comparison with English authors and works. 
Interrelations of our Literature and History. The prominent 
writers of the present day. Prerequisites, the courses in English 
through the Freshman and Sophomore years; should also be 
preceded by Course II. Elective as before. Fall Semester, 
Junior or Senior year. Three hours. 

Course V. — The Drama. — A combination of Course I., the 
English Drama, and Course VIII., the Drama in Translation. 
Prerequisite, the English courses of the Freshman year. Re- 
quired in the Courses in General and Domestic Science, in the 
Fall Semester of the Sophomore year. Five hours. 

Course VI. — The Short Story. — A study of the short story 
from the time of its development as a distinct literary form to 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 331 

the present time. The various types and classes of the short 
story, with principal attention to the product of the last fifty 
years in France, England, and the United States. Prerequisites, 
the English courses through the Freshman and Sophomore years. 
Should also be preceded by one course in the Drama, either 
Course I or Course V. Elective in the Courses in Agriculture, 
in the Course in the Sciences related to the Industries, and in 
the Course in General and Domestic Science. Fall Semester, 
Junior or Senior year. Two hours. 

Course VII. — The Essay. — A course in the leading English 
essayists, such as Addison, Steele, De Quincey, Macaulay, Car- 
lyle, Ruskin, and Matthew Arnold. Prerequisites, the courses 
in English of the Freshman and Sophomore years. Elective as 
before in the spring Semester of the Junior or Senior year. Two 
hours. 

Course VIII. — The Drama in Translation. — A study of the 
leading Greek, French, and German dramatists through an Eng- 
lish translation. Prerequisites, the English of the Freshman 
year. A part of Course V or may be taken independently. 
Elective in the Agricultural courses and in the Course in the 
Sciences related to the Industries. Fall Semester of the Junior 
or Senior year. Two hours. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

ADEIAN M. NEWENS, PROFESSOR. 

SYBIL LENTNER, INSTRUCTOR IN PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

WINIFRED TTLDEN, INSTRUCTOR IN PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 

In General. 

The relation of the department work to the college course is 
the same as that of any other study. In some courses Public 
Speaking is elective, in some years it is required and the credits 
are given on a basis with every other required or elective study. 
We aim to equip men and women to speak well, to tell what they 
know and give their opinions, read and recite in a pleasing and 
effective manner. All will be called upon at some time to speak 
publicly, all talk every day, more or less, and for both the more 
formidable speech and for conversation the work of the depart- 
ment is planned. The subjects which make for perfection along 
these lines are briefly; emphasis, enunciation, articulation, time, 



332 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

energy, inflection, appreciation of literature, voice culture, ges- 
ture, vocabulary, etc., etc. 

Public Speaking has been and still is considered often as a 
special, peculiar an dextraordinary art. There is no denying 
that it is an art, but first of all it is common sense; common 
sense applied to speech. The principles which govern conversa- 
tion to make it dignified, pleasing and forceful may be called 
Elocution. The mastery of them would make the speaker 
artistic. These principles are not different when applied to 
public speech. Public speech is, therefore, conversation, on an 
enlarged scale. 

To reduce Public Speaking to a system is neither possible 
nor desirable. No one system can be made applicable to all 
persons, as no one style of clothing is appropriate to all classes 
and conditions of men. There are as many styles of elocution 
or systems of expression as there are people. Each one pos- 
sesses an elocution of his own and that should not be taken 
from him and an inferior one for him be substituted. The 
development of that power and manner which one possesses 
already is our aim in the courses of study outlined below. 

We grant that all so-called systems have good suggestions. 
We attempt to use the best of any and all methods, but the 
student himself is the system and he and his possibilities should 
be respected. The elimination of faults in speech which mar his 
efforts and the correction of mannerisms that hinder his success 
are subject to adverse criticism. To stand and think and talk 
well at one and the same time should be the ambition of every 
student, man or woman, in his chosen occupation. 

The theory and practice of Expression, — and speech is more 
practice than theory, — covers four years of work to those who 
begin in the Academic year, three years to those who begin as 
Freshmen. However, not all the college courses grant electives 
in this course with credit, though none are excluded if the 
proper consent is given. We begin with the first and funda- 
mental work, i. e., How to Read. The interpretation of thought 
and sentiment is the first desideratum, after that the attention 
is turned toward physical expression, then on into more for- 
midable recitation and declamation, oratory and extempore 
speaking. 

Public Speech. 

Not the least in point of importance in the course of study 
is that of special attention to the building of an oratorical 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 333 

address or speech. Course VIII has to do with how to write an 
oration. In that course great orations are studied and analyzed. 
Their language and plans are observed and a critical and careful 
scrutiny is given to detail. Winning orations in state and inter- 
state contests are closely observed and the principles which seem 
to have made them win are emulated. The student writes an 
oration on a selected subject and delivers it as a part of his 
work and under the direction of the head of the department. 
In certain courses still another oration is required in the Senior 
year. 

Interpretation and Dramatic Art. 

The life of literature is in its interpretation. The voice and 
body are powerful factors in making literature real. The courses 
in Interpretation include Courses III., IV., V., VI., VII. Here the 
student is brought in contact with good selections from Lyric 
and Epic poetry, Dramatic, Rhetorical and Oratorical literature. 
Throughout the two years, Junior and Senior, he will have 
gained a command of himself, a power of expression and a 
repertoire which will well fit him to appear before any assembly 
to read or recite. Numerous recitals are given before college 
audiences and there he may gain a confidence in himself and 
his abilities which will fit him for more formidable work in the 
future. The work done in these classes is pursued along pro- 
fessional lines. Students wishing to specialize in Public Speak- 
ing will get the best of training, along with their college work, 
in vocal and physical technique. Each student is met privately 
for drill and individual instruction such as he, personally, 
needs and for special appearance before the class and other 
audiences. Students are required to take part in plays and 
prepare and present monologues as a part of the work of the 
last year. 

Extempore Speech. 

Courses X. and XI. have to do with Extempore Speech 
purely. The courses are designed to give students practical 
training in speaking without notes or without having written 
and committed to memory a formal address. There is a great 
demand for men, who are well versed in the sciences and 
industries as offered in the several departments of the College, 
to address institutes, conventions, clubs and commissions on 



334 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

topics related to their chosen work. At gatherings formal and 
informal that person is in demand who can say the right thing 
at the right time and in the right way. It is a worthy accom- 
plishment to be able to speak well upon any occasion. For all 
such, these courses aim to prepare the student. They are in 
every way practical. The student from the very first is called 
to the floor to address his class on assigned topics. He is 
given from three days to a week to gather his material and 
get it ready for his appearance before the class. As often as 
once a week each individual is on the floor, oftener if possible. 
He is subjected to criticisms by the class and the instructor. 
Criticisms are offered on the prescribed lines of general appear- 
ance, force of address, arrangement of material, use of words, 
vocabulary, etc., etc. By subjecting himself to this severe 
scrutiny, and by the frequency of his addresses, the student 
gains an acquaintance with himself and a habit of thinking 
which is real experience in speechmaking, second only to that 
which he would gain in appearing before outside audiences. 

Courses of Study in Public Speaking. 

Course !. — Elementary Speech. — Required First Semester, 
Academic year, all courses. Two hours per week. 

Lectures on Emphasis, Purpose and kindred topics. Stu- 
dents analyze, read and recite selections from masterpieces of 
rhetorical and oratorical literature, prose and poetry. Thought 
getting and giving are the objects of this semester's work. 

Course II. — Gesture and Voice. — Required Second Semester, 
Academic year, in Agricultural Courses and Second Semester, 
Freshman year, in Science, Domestic Science and General and 
Domestic Science Courses. One hour per week. 

Lectures on vocal and physical expression. Class exercises 
in voice and bodily expression. Recitations and declamations 
accompanied by coaching and criticism on the floor. 

Course III. — Advanced Interpretation. — Elective First Se- 
mester, Junior year. Open to students in Junior and Senior 
years who have completed Course II. or its equivalent. Offered 
in all courses except Domestic Science, Engineering and Veter- 
inary. Two hours per week. 

Lectures on Imagination, Personal Magnetism, Methods and 
Criticisms and other elements of Interpretation. Drills and 
exercises on the floor. Selections are assigned and recitals are 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 335 

given in class. Students are coached and drilled individually out- 
side of class hours. 

Course IV. — Expression. — Elective Second Semester, Junior 
year. Open to students in the Junior and Senior years who 
have completed Courses II. and III. or their equivalents. Offered 
in all courses except Domestic Science, Engineering and Veter- 
inary. Two hours per week.- 

This course is a continuation of Course III., Advanced 
Interpretation. Lectures on Character Study, Beginnings of 
Dramatic Interpretation. Selections are assigned, recitals are 
given in class. Students are coached and drilled individually 
outside of class hours. 

Course V. — Dramatic Art. — Elective First Semester, Senior 
year. (Option between Course V. and Course X.) Open to stu- 
dents in the Senior year and others who have completed Courses 
II. and III. or their equivalents. Offered in all courses except 
Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per week. 

Lectures on Stage-setting, Dramatics, The Monologue, etc. 
Arrangements of scences from Dramatic Literature. Original 
arrangement of Stories from magazines and novels. Coaching 
and drill of plays and monologues. Continued in Course VI. 

Course VI. — Advanced Dramatic Art. — Elective Second Se- 
mester, Senior year. (Option between Course VI. and Course 
XI.) Open to students who have completed Courses II., III. 
and IV, or II., III. and V. or their equivalents. Offered in all 
courses except Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per 
week. 

Continuation of Course V. Advanced Dramatics and Lec- 
ture-Recitals. 

Course X. — Extempore Speech. — Elective First Semester, 
Senior year. (Option between Course X and Course V). Open 
to students in Senior year. No prerequisites. Offered in all 
courses except Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per 
week. 

Lectures on Extempore Speech. Library Research work. 
Topics assigned, speeches made and criticisms offered in class. 
A practical course in public speaking. Continued in Course XI. 

Course XI. — Advanced Extempore Speech. — Elective Second 
Semester, Senior year. (Option between Course XI and Course 
VI.) Open to students who have completed Course X. or to 
those approved by the head of the department. Offered in all 



OOO IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

courses except Engineering and Veterinary. Two hours per 
week. 

Continuation of Course X. Extempore Speeches, Forensics, 
Discussions. The course is designed to make the student an 
efficient public speaker. 

(Note. Engineering students may elect Courses III., IV., 
V., VI., VIII., X. and XI. by the consent of the Dean of Engi- 
neering.) 

Course VII. — Public Speech. — Required First Semester, 
Junior year, Domestic Science and General and Domestic Science 
only. Two hours per week. 

Lectures on the Art of Public Speech. Correlation of Speech 
Arts with other Arts. Speech forms and values. Interpretation, 
and Library Research work. 

Course VIM. — Advanced Public Speech. — Required Second 
Semester, Junior year, Science and General and Domestic Science 
Courses only. Elective in Agricultural Courses. One hour per 
week. 

Lectures on orations and Orators. How to prepare and 
write addresses. The study of speeches and master orations. 
At least one formal oration and the delivery of the same is 
required of each student. 

Course IX. — Oration. — Required Second Semester, Senior 
year, Science, Domestic Science and General and Domestic 
Science. Elective in the Agricultural Courses. One oration 
written and delivered under the direction of the head of the 
department. 

Courses of Study. 

Besides these specified courses of instruction in class, nu- 
merous special lessons and drill are given in the nature of coach- 
ing. Special selections are assigned based on the needs of the 
student as seen in his class-room work and his defects and 
strengths are given especial attention. Literary society declama- 
tory and oratorical contest work is cared for by the teaching 
force of the department, such drill and preparation as each may 
need for his appearance in the contest are provided gratis. 



DIVISION OP SCIENCE 337 

PHYSICAL CULTURE FOR WOMEN. 

WINIFRED TILDEN, INSTRUCTOR. 

Training in Physical Culture is required of the young women 
in the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior years. The work begins 
the middle of October and ends the middle of April. Two forty- 
five minute periods each week are required. Individual daily 
exercise is strongly urged and is under the personal direction 
of the instructor. Physical examinations are given and meas- 
urements are taken three times a year, at the beginning of the 
Fall and Spring Semesters and at the end of the Spring Semester. 

No one system of exercises, but a combination of the best 
suggestions from several systems are used. The highest ideals 
are kept constantly before the mind, not only health and strength, 
but ease, grace and refinement in manner and carriage of the 
body. A well poised, erect body is usually indicative of a high 
moral character. 

Indian clubs, wands, dumb-bells, exercisers, Swedish appa- 
ratus, etc., are used but the most careful attention is given to 
free-hand exercises, which strengthen, particularly, the muscles 
of the vital organs so that means of attaining perfect health may 
be within the reach of each individual. The advanced work is 
along the lines of aesthetics. A few minutes each period 
throughout each year are given to brisk walking and running 
exercises. 

Gymnasium suits of dark blue flannel or serge, regulation 
blouse and bloomers, and gymnasium shoes are required, so that 
the body has perfect freedom in all exercises. 

Basket-ball, Tennis and Field-Hocky are the out-of-door 
sports, and are open to all students, but, hereafter, cannot be 
substituted for regular gymnasium work. 

Courses of Study. 

Course I. — Required First Semester, Freshman year. Two 
hours per week. 

Exercises for correct standing, walking and marching. Free- 
hand exercises while standing, walking and running. 

Course II. — Required Second Semester, Freshman year. Two 
hours per week. 

Marching continued, emphasizing military precision. Free- 
hand exercises continued. Drills with wands and bar-bells. 
22 



338 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course III. — Required First Semester, Sophomore year. Two 
hours per week. 

A few minutes each period are given to walking and run- 
ning steps. This is a course in breathing and breath control 
combined with suitable free-hand exercises. 

Course IV. — Required Second Semester, Sophomore year. 
Two hours per week. 

Specific exercises for all muscles of the body. Floor work, 
dumb-bell drills. 

Course V. — Required First Semester, Junior year. Two 
hours per week. 

Specific exercises continued. Indian club swinging and light 
apparatus work. 

Course VI. — Required Second Semester, Junior year. Two 
hours per week. 

Swedish apparatus. Fancy steps and drills. 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES. 

LIZZIE MAY ALLIS, PROFESSOR. 
MISS NORTON, MISS LUCAS, MISS M'COLLOM, ASSISTANTS. 

The College now offers a two and one-half years' course in 
German and two years' course in French. 

Students in all the Engineering Courses take French or 
German two years. 

Freshman French or German for Engineering students is 
second year work. 

French or German is required of Agricultural students in 
the Freshman year. 

In the Academic year of the course in Science, German is 
taken, provided the English grammar of the Academic year has 
been completed. 

In the Freshman year of the course in Science, second year 
German or first year French is optional. 

In the Sophomore year of the same course, for the First 
Semester, third year German or second year French is optional. 

In the course for women, in the Academic year, German is 
taken, if English grammar of the Academic year has been com- 
pleted. German or French is optional in the first two years of 
the course for women. 

German and French are electives in the Junior and Senior 
years of the same course. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



French. 



Course I. — First Semester. — Fraser and Squair's French 
Grammar is used as text-book for grammatical work, supple- 
mented by conversation and dictation exercises. 

Course II. — Second Semester. — -Grammar continued and 
translation and study of "L'Abbe Constantin," Halevy. 

Course III. — Third Semester. — "La Belle Nivernaise," Dau- 
det; "Colomba," Merimee; "Un Philosophe Sous Les Toits," Sou- 
vestre. 

Course IV. — Fourth Semester. — "Les Miserables," Hugo; 
"Monte-Cristo," Dumas; A Scientific French Reader, Herdler. 

Course X. — Academic Year. First Semester. — Engineering 
Students. — Fraser and Squair's French Grammar is used as 
text-book for the grammatical work, supplemented by conversa- 
tion and dictation exercises. Three times per week. 

Course XI. — Academic Year. Second Semester. Engineer- 
ing Students. — Grammar continued and "L'Abbe Constantin," 
Halevy. Three times per week. 

German. 

Course V. — First Semester. — Vos's "Essentials of German," 
including grammar, composition, reading and conversation. 

Course VI. — Second Semester. — Vos's "Essentials of Ger- 
man," with continued drill in the principles of declension, conju- 
gation and syntax. Storm's "Immensee." 

Course VII. — Third Semester. — "Hoher als die Kirche," Hil- 
lern; Carruth's "German Reader." 

Courses VIII. and IX. — Fourth and Fifth Semesters. — "Ger- 
man Science Reader," Gore; Works of Goethe and Schiller, con- 
versation and study of syntax being continued throughout the 
course. 

Course XII. — Academic Year. First Semester. Engineering 
Students. — Vos's "Essentials of German," including grammar, 
composition, reading and conversation. Three times per week. 

Course XIII. — Academic Year. Second Semester. Engineer- 
ing Students. — Vos's "Essentials of German," with continued 
drill in the principles of declension, conjugation and syntax. 
Storm's "Immensee." Three times per week. 



340 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY. 

ORANGE HOWARD CESSNA, PROFESSOR. 

PAUL SKEELS PEIRCE, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR. 

MISS MAE MILLER AND MISS ETHYL CESSNA, INSTRUCTORS. 

Increasing emphasis is rightly placed on the value of the 
study of history both from the standpoint of general culture and 
that of usefulness. The men and women who take up the duties 
of citizenship in this day should have the broadest outlook and 
come to their tasks with a sympathetic appreciation of what the 
world has already achieved. No study can have a more practical 
bearing upon the preparation of the citizen than the evolution of 
human institutions. 

The present day utilitarian view of life may sacrifice the 
man and the citizen in the interest of the specialist, yet in 
reality he is the most successful in his specialty, other things 
being equal, who comes to it with the broadest general perpara- 
tion. 

In view of these facts, the courses in History aim to give, 
as far as possible in the limited time allotted, a good general 
view of the evolution of social, economic and political institutions 
and the main elements of civilization in general, and to fit the 
student for intelligently assuming the duties of citizenship. 

The student has at his command the large College Library, 
which contains, besides the principal works of reference, an im- 
portant section devoted to historical subjects. Quite an addition 
to the library has been recently made of the new books covering 
the later phases of historical development. 

The text-book in each case is equivalent to about one-half 
the required work. The remainder is covered by the lectures 
and library work and thesis preparation. 

Courses in History. 

Course I. — The History of Western Europe. — Beginning with 
the Middle Ages the aim of this course is to trace the origin 
and development of the modern states of Europe. The text-book 
is supplemented by library and written work. 

Five hours per week, First Semester of the Academic year of 
all the Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course II. — Advanced American History. — This course is a 
careful study of the leading events in American history and seeks 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 341 

to trace the great historic movements in the evolution of the 
nation. Text-book and lectures with written and library work. 

Four hours per week in the Second Semester of the Academic 
year of all the Science and Agricultural Courses. Course I is a 
prerequisite for entering this course. 

Course III. — National Expansion, 1783 to 1845. — This course 
treats of the results of the American Revolution; the critical 
period and the forming of the Constitution; Federal and Repub- 
lican supremacy; territorial expansion and the great western 
movements, together with the social and political readjustments 
during the the Jacksonian period and the slavery struggle to 
1845. Text-book, lectures and library work. 

Three hours per week, First Semester of the Senior year of 
all Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course IV.— The Welding of the Nation, 1845 to 1900.— This 
course treats of the conditions preceding the Civil War and the 
causes, principal features and results of the struggle; the Re- 
construction period; the political, social and economic move- 
ments and foreign relations of America as it faces the problems 
of the present. Text-book and lectures and library work. 

Three hours per week. Elective Second Semester of the 
Senior year of all Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course V. — Europe in the 16th, 17th and 18th Centuries. — 
This course aims to give a careful study to historic development 
during these important centuries. The principal topics treated 
are: The Reformation, the struggle for constitutional liberty in 
England, the ascendency of France, the rise of Prussia and Rus- 
sia and England's colonial supremacy. Attention is given to the 
social, economic and literary features as well as the political 
movements of the period. Lectures and library work. 

Three hours per week. Elective First Semester, Junior year 
of the Science and Agricultural Courses. Required in the First Se- 
mester, Sophomore year of the General and Domestic Science and 
Domestic Science Courses. 

Course VI. — The French Revolution and the XlXth Century. 
— This course is a study of causes and results of the French 
Revolution, the Napoleonic Era, the reactions and revolutions of 
the XlXth century to the close of the Franco-Prussian war. 
Attention will be given to the institutional changes touching the 
political, social and economic aspects of the movements. Text- 
book, lectures and library work. 



342 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Three hours per week. Required Second Semester, Junior 
year of the General and Domestic Science and Domestic Science 
Courses. Elective in the Science and Agricultural Courses. 

Course VII.— The XlXth Century (First Half).— The aim of 
this course is to study the causes and significance of the French 
Revolution; the reactionary movements under Metternich and 
the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848. Lectures with library work. 

Two hours per week, elective, and may be taken in First Se- 
mester of either the Junior or Senior year of the Engineering 
Courses. 

Course VIII.— The XlXth Century (Last Half.)— Beginning 
with a brief review of the French Revolution and the events of 
the early part of the century this course traces the causes and 
results of the Reconstruction of Europe during the last half of 
the century. Special attention is given to German and Italian 
unity; the French Empire and Republic; the Victorian Era in 
English history and the Eastern Question. Lectures, papers and 
library work. 

Elective, two hours per week and may be taken in the 
Second Semester of either the Junior or Senior year of the 
Engineering Courses. 

Course IX. — The Far Eastern Question. — This course covers 
the questions growing out of the later developments in the Far 
East. It is a study of world movements at the beginning of the 
new century. It is based on Reinch's "World Politics at the Close 
of the XlXth Century." Lectures and library work. 

Two hours per week, elective Second Semester, Senior year 
of the Courses in Science, General and Domestic Science, Domes- 
tic Science, and Agriculture. 

Course X. — The Renaissance. — This course is a study of the 
Renaissance Period. It is a survey of the causes and movements 
leading to the great intellectual quickening during the latter half 
of the Middle Ages. It traces the development of these forces 
both in Italy and, the Northern Countries in their influence upon 
civilization. It emphasizes the agents and events which con- 
tributed most largely to that transformation of Europe which 
ushers in the Modern Period. Text-book, lectures and library 
work. 

Two hours, First Semester. Elective. First Semester, Jun- 
ior year of the Science, General and Domestic Science and Agri- 
cultural Courses. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 343 

Courses XI. — The Constitutional History of England. — This 
course traces the development of English Political History. It 
treats of the steps in the growth of Constitutional Government 
and Anglo-Saxon institutions and their influence upon American 
ideals. The constitutional aspect of England's History is most 
interesting and significant. "In no other field of English activity 
is to be found so clear a revelation of English National Char- 
acter." This course serves as an introduction to Course III. 
Text-book, lectures and library work. 

Elective. Two hours per week, Second Semester, Junior 
year. Science, General and Domestic Science, and Agricultural 
Courses. 

Course XII. — Diplomatic History of the United States. — There 
is an increasing demand for a knowledge of our foreign relations. 
The great development of the industrial resources of the country 
and recently acquired territorial possessions have given new 
interest and importance to international relations of the United 
States. This course gives at least a survey of the more impor- 
tant of these diplomatic transactions. 

Elective in the First Semester of the Senior year in the 
Science, General and Domestic Science, Domestic Science, and 
Agricultural Courses. 

Course XV. — The History of Western Europe. — Same as 
Course I except that it is a four-hour course. 

Required of all Engineering students, First Semester of the 
Academic year. 

Course XVI. — Advanced American History. — A two-hour 
course covering the same general field as Course II. 

Required of all Engineering students in the Second Semester 
of the Academic year. Course XV is a prerequisite for entering 
this course. 

Course XVII. — English History. — A general survey of the 
field, with emphasis upon the growth of the English Constitution 
and its relation to the constitutional development of the United 
States. This course will serve as a background for Course XVIII. 
Lectures, text-book, and assignments. 

One hour per week. Required of all Engineering and Agri- 
cultural students in the First Semester of the Freshman year. 

Course XVIII. — The Formation of the Union. — A special 
study of the period of the making of the American nation. The 
achieving of independence, the securing of the Constitution, the 
inauguaration of the new government, early national problems, 



344 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

and the formulation of parties and policies, will fall within the 
scope of this course. Lectures, text-hook, and assignments. 

One hour per week. Required of all Engineering and Agri- 
cultural students in the Second Semester of the Freshman year. 

DEPARTMENT OF CIVICS. 

EICHAKD CORNELIUS BABBETT, PEOFESSOE. 

Civics as herein used means the science that treats of citi- 
zenship and of the relations between citizens and the govern- 
ment; ethics, or the doctrines of duty to society; civil policy, or 
governmental methods and machinery; law, in its application 
most directly involving the interests of society; history of civic 
development and movement, and the structure and the working 
of the government and the interrelation of states. 

While it is planned to give instruction concerning the Amer- 
ican government as it now exists, the student will be expected 
to look forward to the solution of such problems as may confront 
the people and the government. At the same time such definite 
and fixed historical information will be expected from each stu- 
dent as will enable him to have a clear understanding of present 
governmental forms and practices. 

No system of human government is perfect. The discussion 
of defective laws and the non-enforcement of present laws are 
common topics of conversation in every state and union. 

Believing that in a republic where the people are supreme, 
an education is incomplete, if not a failure, that does not relate 
itself to the duties and opportunities of citienship it will be a 
purpose to point out to the student a reasonable and patriotic 
duty touching present laws, and to aid him in all possible ways 
to become a useful, honored, and law abiding member of the 
civic community, and to give him suitable instruction with regard 
to public affairs. 

The courses are planned to give such knowledge and training 
as it is believed should be a part of a liberal education. 

The courses offered in Civics are more or less closely inter- 
related with those given in the Departments of History, and 
Economics, but it is believed that the association will prove in 
every way helpful to the student. 

Courses in Civics. 

Course I. — When deemed advisable to the proper instruction 
and advancement of students attention will be directed particu- 



DIVISION OP SCIENCE 345 

larly to the following topics: City, county, and state govern- 
ments; constitutional conventions; constitutions as "Supreme 
Law!" checks and balances; the presidency; the senate; the 
house of representatives; general powers of Congress; the judi- 
cial system, federal and state; divisions of powers between the 
Union and the states; comparison with other federal govern- 
ments; the spoils system and civil service; government of terri- 
tories and colonies. A text-book is used which is supplemented 
with papers and library work. Two hours per week, First and 
Second Semesters of the Academic year of the Engineering and 
Science Courses. 

Course II. — Principles of American Government. — A study of 
the sources and development of the principles of the federal 
government. In this course the following documents will be 
studied and analyzed: Magna Charta, the Act of Habeas Corpus, 
The Petition of Right, The Bill of Rights, Colonial Charters, 
Plans for Union, the Declaration of Independence, Articles of 
Confederation, the First State Constitutions, and the Constitution 
of the United States. The American Party Sysem; origin, 
structure and administration. Relation between the Federal and 
State governments will also be studied. As a prerequisite for 
this course the student must have pursued Course I., or its 
equivalent. The course calls for individual work and investiga- 
tion. The library is, in this course the student's work shop. 
Three hours per week. Elective in the First Semester of the 
Senior year of the Science and General and Domestic Science 
Courses. 

Course III. — The State and Federal Constitutions. — In this 
course very little attention is given to theories, but careful con- 
sideration is given to principles which have been settled judi- 
cially or otherwise. The student will study: The rise of the 
American Union; distribution of the powers of government; the 
powers of Congress; the powers of the legislature; the powers of 
the federal executive; the powers of the state executive; the 
judicial department of the federal government; the judicial 
department of the state government; the government of the 
territories; the admission of new states; civil rights and their 
guaranties; political privileges and their protections; protection 
to persons accused of crime; protection to contract and property; 
the eminent domain; municipal corporations. The text-book is 
'oAipaxa '2[.ioto. XjBjqn pub siadi3d 'sajupai Aq p^uauiaiddns 



346 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

three hours per week in the Second Semester of the Senior year 
of the Science and the General and Domestic Science Courses. 

Course IV. — The demand for the more adequate teaching of 
morals, especially with regard to the making of good citizens has 
prompted the preparation of this course. Among the subjects 
discussed are the following: The family and its government; 
conditions of good citizenship; rights and duties of citizens; the 
citizen's duty to the government; abuses and perils of govern- 
ment; improvement of government; the economic duties of citi- 
zens; social rights and duties; the great social subjects; the 
treatment of criminals, paupers and incorrigible children; inter- 
national duties, or the rights and duties of nation; ideals, or 
the higher law. Elective, two hours per week in the Second 
Semester of the Junior year of the Science and General and 
Domestic Science Courses. 

Course V. — Rural Law. — This course is a discussion of Iowa 
Laws as related to highways, fences, weeds, water rights, ditch- 
ing, drainage, live stock, trespassing, etc., and the legal rights, 
duties and responsibilities of farmers. Attention will also be 
given to contracts, negotiable instruments, sales and personal 
property. Elective, one hour per week, Second Semester of the 
Senior year of the Agricultural Courses. 

Course VI. — Actual Government. — It is the aim in this course 
to aid the student to gain a more intimate knowledge of actual 
governmental affairs. The American governmental system is 
treated as a unit; state government and the various phases of 
local government are taught not as afterthoughts to the national 
system, but as integral parts of one American government. The 
student is taught that the Construction and Statutes are only the 
framework of government and that vitalized government depends 
upon personal interest and personal action. The constant at- 
tempt is to explain both the organization and the functions of 
government, not simply by what the constitutions and laws say 
ought to be done, but by the experience of what is done. Two 
hours per week. Required Second Semester of the Freshman 
year of the Science and General and Domestic Science Courses. 

Course VII. — Comparative Government. — A course of three 
hours a week, lectures and recitations throughout the First 
Semester. This course is optional, elective for Course II. Open 
to all Seniors in the Science and the General and Domestic 
Science Courses. The work of the Semester will include a com- 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 347 

parative study of the governments of England, France, Germany, 
Switzerland, Canada, Mexico and the United States. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS. 

JAMES RUSH LINCOLN, PROFESSOR. 

It is not intended to complete the education of the thorough 
soldier, but to fit young men for filling intelligently, positions in 
the State troops as line officers and company instructors. The 
constant demand for men thus trained emphasizes the value of a 
thouroughly organized and well sustained military course. The 
chief advantages derived are the acquirement of a dignified 
carriage of the person, a gentlemanly deportment and a self- 
respecting discipline, with habits of neatness, order and punc- 
tuality. Opportunities are afforded each cadet for extending the 
studies in military science, as desired, the College being pro- 
vided with the necessary arms, accoutrements and outfits for 
drill and instructions in the infantry, artillery, and signal tactics, 
for which special classes will be formed. Lectures on military 
subjects are delivered throughout the course, and regular bat- 
talion drill and parade take place each Monday and Wednesday 
afternoon. All male students of the College, except such as may 
be excused on account of physical disability by proper authority, 
are required to become members of the College battalion, and 
wear the prescribed uniform during military exercises. Students 
in the Academic year are not required to drill. 

Course I. — First Semester, Freshman Year. — Two drills each 
week. 

Course II. — Second Semester, Freshman Year. — Two drills 
each week. 

Course III. — First Semester, Sophomore Year. — Two drills 
each week and Non-Commissioned Officers' School of one hour 
each week; School of the Guides and Guard Duty. 

Course IV. — Second Semester, Sophomore Year. — Two drills 
each week, and Non-Commissioned Officers' School of one hour 
each week; Drill Regulations and Guard Duty. 

Course V. — First Semester, Junior Year, and 

Course VI. — Second Semester, Junior Year. — Two drills each 
week, and Officers' School of one hour each week; Drill Regula- 
tions, Guard Duty and Army Regulations. Elective in all courses. 

Course VII. — First Semester, Senior Year, and 



348 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Course VIII. — Second Semester, Senior Year. — Two drills 
each week, and Officers' School of one hour each week; Service 
of Security and Information; Military Engineering; Military 
Law, and Military Hygiene. Elective in all courses. 

THE LIBRARY. 

VINA ELETHE CLARK, LIBRARIAN. 
MISS STEVENS, ASSISTANT. 

The College Library numbers about 18,000 volumes, these 
being standard works of history, biography, engineering, agricul- 
ture, natural science, mental and moral philosophy, poetry, gen- 
eral literature and reference. It has been arranged with a view 
to making it especially valuable as a reference library. 

The books are selected by specialists, the heads of depart- 
ments indicating such works as they wish the library to have 
bearing upon their respective lines of study. 

The library is classified according to the Dewey Decimal 
System of Classification and the card catalog is in two parts, the 
Dictionary (author and title) and Classed. 

The library receives about 225 periodical publications, liter- 
ary, scientific and general, and there are complete files of many 
of these upon the shelves. 

The library has on file 5,000 unbound pamphlets, and is in 
constant receipt of large numbers of pamphlet publications from 
the various departments of the government, agricultural experi- 
ment stations and other sources. The library has also several 
hundred bound volumes of government publications, such as 
Geological Surveys, United States Experiment Station Bulletins, 
Congressional Record, War of Rebellion Record, Census Reports, 
Cabinet Officers' Reports, etc. 

The reading room of the library is a large, well-lighted room, 
and is open to readers ten hours daily, except Sundays, when it 
is open five hours. Current numbers of periodicals are kept in 
the reading room and are accessible to all, as are newspapers, 
college exchanges, dictionaries, encyclopaedias, Poole's Index, the 
card catalog, etc. 

The library subscribes for several Chicago and Iowa dailies, 
and, through the courtesy of the editors, a large number of the 
daily and county newspapers of Iowa are sent to the reading 
room for the use of students. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 849 

Personal assistance and suggestions upon all matters relat- 
ing to the library will be given by the librarian and assistant to 
all who desire such help. 

All students in the Freshman year in all courses are required 
to take library work to the extent of four hours in the Fall 
Semester. 

Course I. — Library Work. — Four hours in the First Semester, 
Freshman year. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC. 

FEANK J. BESLEB, DIEECTOE. 

The general plan of instruction is similar to that of the 
best conservatories, and aims to cultivate in the pupil an intelli- 
gent appreciation of the noble and beautiful in Music. It is 
designed to lay a sound foundation upon which to build rather 
than to impart a superficial knowledge for the purpose of display. 
The branches taught are Piano, Pipe Organ, Voice Culture, His- 
tory of Music and Sight Singing. For the completion of the work 
outlined, the College will grant a certificate. 

Piano.— Course of Instruction. 

Grade 1. — Rudiments of Music. — Czerny, Op. 139. Graded 
course of studies. Mathews. Scales and chords. 

Grade 2. — Concone Op. 24 or 30. Czerny Op. 299, No. 1. 
Heller Op. 47. Czerny Op. 299, No. 2. Concone Op. 25. Selected 
Octave studies, Czerny Op. 299, No. 3. Finger Gymnastics. 

Grade 3. — Sonata's of Haydn. Songs without words, Men- 
delssohn. Five Sonata's of Mozart. One book of Heller's Studies 
of Expression or one of similar style and difficulty. Czerny Op. 
834. Czerny Op. 553. Tausig's Daily studies. Miscellaneous 
selections. 

Grade 4. — Cramer's fifty studies. Five Sonatas of Beetho- 
ven. Chopin, seven Waltzes, two Polonaises, three Mazurkas, 
three Nocturnes, one Ballade, one Scherzo, three Etudes. Tau- 
sig's daily studies. Miscellaneous selections. 

Grade 5. — dementi's Gradus ad Parnassum. Four selections 
from Bach, two from Rubinstein and Moszkowski each, four from 
Liszt and four concert pieces of various composers. Tausig's 
daily studies, second book finished. Kullak's Octave studies. 



350 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Voice Culture. — Course of Instruction. 

First Year. — The principles, theory and practice of tone pro- 
duction. Freedom of tone, breath control. Placing of the voice. 
Open throat, Articulation. Legato style, color and character of 
voice on simple songs. 

Second Year. — The development of technical facility. Exer- 
cises for flexibility. Phrasing and articulation. The develop- 
ment of self-expression in the interpretation of songs. Study of 
best English and American songs. 

Third Year. — Advanced technical study. The study of reci- 
tative and advanced work in interpretation, public performance 
or preparation for teaching. Songs from the great masters, 
Schubert, Schumann and Franz. 

Fourth Year. — The study of advanced repertory. Selections 
from oratorio and opera. Preparation of recital for completion 
of course. 

A one year's course in Sight Singing wil lbe required for the 
completion of the Course in Voice Culture. Also at least one 
year's study of the Piano. 

For the completion of the Course in Piano at least one year's 
study of the Voice or Pipe Organ will be required. 

The completion of either course will require the study of 
History of Music and the Theory of Music. 

The candidate for a certificate from the College for the 
completion of either Course in Music shall possess an English 
education equivalent to admittance to the Freshman year of the 
College. 

A Choral Society is maintained, membership being open to 
students and citizens of Ames. Such works as Barnby's Rebekah, 
Gaul's Holy City and Buck's Forty-Sixth Psalm have been given 
successfully in concert. Coleridge Taylor's "Hiawatha's Wedding 
Feast" will be presented in the Spring Semester of 1905. 

An excellent Male Glee Club give concerts each Semester. 
Membership in this organization is gained by examination. 

Public concerts and recitals are given at frequent intervals 
during the year; also private recitals weekly, in which all Music 
pupils will be expected to take part. 

Music students may enter at any time. Students may en- 
roll for Music alone without additional expense. 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 351 

Tuition. 

For term of twenty lessons in any branch $15.00 

Piano Rent. 

One hour daily practice $3.50 

Each additional hour 3.00 

All tuition is due in advance to the director. 

Absence from lessons will not be excused except in case of 
prolonged illness. 



LIST OF STUDENTS 



23 



354 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

HONORS IN THE LITERARY CONTESTS. 

DECLAMATORY CONTEST, SPBING SEMESTER, 1904. 

Dramatic — H. Q. Moore, Bachelor. 
Oratorical — Jennie Tedson, Clio. 

ORATORICAL CONTEST, FALL SEMESTER, 1904. 

First Prize — W. A. Tener, Welsh. 
Second Prize — G. B. Guthrie, Bachelor. 
Third Prize — A. Q. Adamson, Philomathean. 

INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATES, 1904. 

The following students represented the College in the debate 
with Drake University: 

R. L. Collett, Bachelor. 

E. S. Guthrie, Pythian. 

R. K. Bliss, Welsh. 

N. B. Garver, (alternate), Philomathean. 

In the debate with the Iowa State Normal School, the College 
representatives were as follows: 

J. E. Bacchus, Philelentheroi. 

Leonard Paulson, Welsh. 

M. L. Bowman, Pythian. 

Charles Reinbott, Welsh. 

INTER-SOCIETY DEBATES, SPRING TERM, 1904. 

Question: "Resolved, That the United States should adopt 
a system of banking based on commercial assets similar to the 
Canadian system in preference to a system based on United 
States Government Bonds." 

Crescent vs. Bachelor — J. A. McLean, A. E. Bechtelheimer, 
H. O. Tellier, A. B. Scott. 

Bachelor vs. Philelentheroi — F. F. Hofacre, M. B. Williams, 
E. Humbert, M. Havenhill. 

Crescent vs. Philelentheroi — Katherine Terrill, John Hunt, 
M. L. Merritt, R. A. Cave. 

Pythian vs. Philomathean— Smith, R. T. Lyons, C. A. Peter- 
son, G. H. Newcom. 

Welsh vs. Philomathean — Leonard Paulson, G. A. Roberts, 
A. Q. Adamson, J. Q. Wickham. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 355 

Welsh vs. Pythian— Chas. Reinbott, L. E. Troeger, M. L. 
Bowman, R. J. Secor. 

INTER-SOCIETY DEBATES, FALL TEEM, 1904. 

First Section. 

Question: "Resolved, That the history of trade unionism 
in the United States for the past twenty years shows a general 
tendency detrimental to the best interests of the country." 

Philelentheroi vs. Pythian — J. W. Coverdale, C. D. Fores- 
beck, F. O. Nelson, C. B. Guthrie. 

Bachelor vs. Pythian — F. W. Cessna, M. B. Williams, W. E. 
Packard, F. C. Rieke. 

Philelentheroi vs. Bachelor — C. A. Kupfer, E. A. Sayre, C. G. 
Throckmorton, L. W. Ellis. 

Second Section. 

Question: "Resolved, That the Federal Government alone 
should have the power of taxing interstate commerce. Conceded, 
that the basis of assessments should be the earnings." 

Welsh vs. Philomathean — Orval Cohogan, L. W. Wilson, N. 
B. Garver, C. C. Claussen. 

Crescent vs. Philomathean — E. H. Hamilton, M. L. Doty, C. 
A. Peterson, Frank Meiser. 

Welsh vs. Crescent — G. A. Roberts, H. A. Lathrop, H. F. 
Avey, L. E. Kelsey. 

POST GRADUATES. 
Candidates for the Degree of Master of Scientific Agriculture. 

Caine III., John T., B. Sc., (Utah Agr. Coll.) Animal Husbandry, 

Logan, Utah. 
Christie, G. I., B. S. A., (Ont. Agr. Coll.) 1902, B. S. A. (Iowa 

State Coll.) 1903, Agronomy, Ames, Iowa. 
Conover, J. A., B. Sc, (Kan. State Agr. Coll.) Animal Husbandry, 

Ames, Iowa. 
Hildreth, Wm. R., B. S. Ag., (Kas. State Agr. Coll.) Animal 

Husbandry, Altamont, Kansas. 
Hooper, J. J., B. Sc, (Texas Agr. Coll.) Animal Husbandry, 

Houston, Texas. 



356 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Hunt, Thomas S., B. S. A., (Iowa State Coll.) 1903, Agronomy, 

Ames, Iowa. 
Klinck, L. S., B. S. A., (Ont. Agr. Coll.) Agronomy, Ames, Iowa. 
Lauder, Andrew Gilbert, B. S. A., (Cornell Univ.) 1902, Agronomy, 

Binghamton, New York. 
Nielson, Harold T., B. S., (Kas. Agr. Coll.) Agronomy, Denmark, 

Kansas. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Science. 

Bartholomew, C. Edgar, B. S., (Iowa State Coll.) 1904, Zoology, 

Ames, Iowa. 
Buchanan, Robert Earle, B. S., (Iowa State Coll.) 1904, Botany, 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Fogell, Estelle D., A. B., (Parsons Coll.) 1899, B. S., (Iowa State 

Coll.) 1903, Botany, Burlington, Iowa. 
McKay, Willis G., B. S., (Iowa State Coll.) 1898, Botany, Ames, 

Iowa. 



SENIOR. 




NAME. COUESE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Adamson, G. J., C. E., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Agg, T. R„ E. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Anderson, Keo, Sc, 


Jewell Junct, 


Hamilton. 


Anstey, John, Vet., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Anthony, H. F., C. E., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Avey, H. T., M. E., 


Blockton, 


Taylor. 


Bartholomew, Jeanette, 






G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bechtelheimer, A. E., C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Benson, J. N., C. E., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Beyer, H. O., Mn. E. 


Edgwood, 


Clayton. 


Barclay, P. V., Agron., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Barrett, D, C, C. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Bliss, R. K., A. H., 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Bothell, Frank, Dairy, 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Botsford, W. C, E. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Boudinot, A. R., C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Bowman, M. L., A. H., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Brandt, Iva, G. & D. S., 


Jewell Junct. 


Hamilton. 


Budge, Ben G., Sc, 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Buell, J. A., C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bullock, C. F., M. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Cammack, A., M. E., 


Salem, 


Henry. 


Campbell, Mabel, G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cassady, G. R., A. H., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



357 



Caughey, J. W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cessna, F. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chambers, Viola, 


Sc., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Claybaugh, W. C, 


Hort., 


Valley, 


Nebraska. 


Clyde, R. W., 


C. E., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Coates, A. B., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coffey, R. C., 


Mh. E., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Cole, Mildred, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Collett, R. L., 


Sc, 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Cook, A. L., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Cooper, R. D., 


C. E., 


LaPorte City, 


Blackhawk. 


Cox, R. L., 


C. E., 


Geneseo, 


New York. 


Currie, C. H., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Crawford, C. J., 


C. E., 


New London, 


Henry. 


Curtis, J. P., 


E. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Curtis, R. S., 


A. H., 


Columbus Jet., 


Louisa. 


Cutler, G. C, 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cutler, J. L., 


A. H., 


Orchard, 


Mitchell. 


Daniels, P. H., 


M. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Davidson, Jessie, G. 


& D. S., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Davidson, Mary, G. 


& D. S., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Dean, H. G., 


Dairy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Deshler, W. E., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dodge, M. V., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Dykstra, R. R., 


Vet., 


Orange City, 


Sioux. 


Ellenberger, Howard, 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ellis, J. A., 


Dairy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Epley, A. C, 


Agron., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Fair, D. H., 


C. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Fawcett, H. S., 


Sc, 


Salem, 


Ohio. 


Fegles, D. B., 


C. E., 


LaPorte City, 


Black Hawk. 


Fenstermaker, S. E., 


M. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Fitch, T. T., 


E. E., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Flynn, J. P., 


C. E., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Fogler, L. H., 


Sc, 


Osceola, 


Clarke. 


Fraser, Jessie, G. 


& D. S., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Frederick, H. J., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Fyler, L. S., 


E. E., 


Shell Rock, 


Butler. 


Gabrilsen, Carolyn, 


Sc, 


New Hampton, 


Chickasaw. 


Galley, J. H., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Garver, N. B., 


C. E., 


Farmington, 


Van Buren. 


Gilchrist, W. D., 


Vet., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Gillespie, Leigh, 


E. E., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Gillette, Opal, 


Sc, 


Fostorla, 


Clay. 


Gillette, R. U., 


A. H., 


Fostoria, 


Clay. 


Goble, Rose, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gordon, W. M., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Greene, Merritt, 


Agron., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Gribbin, R. L., 


A. H., 


Minden, 


Dallas. 



358 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Griffith, Zaidee, 

G. & D. S., D. S., 

Grubb, Victor, , A. H., 

Haselton, W. R., E. E., 
Hibbard, Stella, G. & D. S., 

Hofacre, F. F., Sc, 

Hoffman, A. H., E. E., 

Hook, J. W., M. E., 

Horn, A. R., E. E., 

Howard, Chelsea, A. H., 

Hunt, W. S., Vet., 

Jacobsen, B. C., C. E., 

Jarnagin, M. P., A. H., 

Johnson, J. P., Vet., 

Jones, Edward, M. E., 

Jorgensen, F. F., Mn. E., 
Kennedy, May, G. & D. S., 

Knickerbocker, C. J., A. H.. 

Labberton, G. P., M. E., 

Leefers, O. L., C. E., 

Lynch, W. J., A. H., 

Madson, Wm. E. Vet, 

Mahanke, Clarence, E. E., 

Maharg, Earl, A. H., 

Maynard, R. P., C. E., 

McCain, P. L., E. E., 

McCulloch, M. E., A. H., 

McKinley, Ethel, G. & D. S., 

Middleton, W. G., Vet, 

Minkler, F. C, A. H., 

Morris, C. C, C. E., 
Morrison, Margaret, 

G. & D. S., 

Mosher, Agnes, Sc, 

Mosher, M. L., Agron., 

Nash, C. W., A. H., 

Nelson, Fred O., Agron., 

Nichols, S. S., M. E., 

Overholser, Pearl, Sc, 

Page, M. L., M. E., 

Patton, T. J., C. E., 

Paxton, I. B., Vet., 

Pendray, E. E., E. E., 

Peterson, A. L., Dairy, 

Peterson, G. C, C. E., 
Pettinger, Celestine, 

G. & D. S., 

Plumley, H. R., E. E., 

Porter, B. E., A. H., 

Prather, C. M., E. E., 



Ames, 
Panora, 
Glidden, 
Paullina, 
Monticello, 
Sigourney, 
Hedrick, 
Newton, 
New Providence, 
Ames, 
Walnut, 
Jefferson City, 
Kimballton, 
Ames, 
Denison, 
Collins, 
Fairfax, 
Orange City, 
Cedar Rapids, 
Greene, 
Vermillion, 
Parkersburg, 
Audubon, 
Traer, 

Des Moines, 
Humeston, 
St. Ansgar, 
Ames, 
Nevada, 
Corning, 

Hedrick, 

Sioux Rapids, 

West Liberty, 

Ames, 

Toledo, 

Marshalltown, 

Ames, 

Charles City, 

Newton, 

Ames, 

Oskaloosa, 

Ames, 

Harlan, 

Cumberland, 
Rockford, 
Ames. 
Walla Walla. 



Story. 

Guthrie. 

Carroll. 

O'Brien. 

Jones. 

Keokuk. 

Keokuk. 

Jasper. 

Hardin. 

Story. 

Pottawattamie, 

Tennessee. 

Audubon. 

Story. 

Crawford. 

Story. 

Linn. 

Sioux. 

Linn. 

Butler. 

South Dakota. 

Butler. 

Audubon. 

Tama. 

Polk. 

Wayne. 

Mitchell. 

Story. 

Story. 

Adams. 

Keokuk. 

Buena Vista. 

Muscatine. 

Story. 

Tama. 

Marshall. 

Story. 

Floyd. 

Jasper. 

Story. 

Mahaska. 

Story. 

Shelby. 

Cass. 
Floyd. 
Story. 
Washington. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



359 



Prouty, Helen, G. 


& D. S., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Rasmussen, Fred, 


Dairy, 


Jewell Jet. 


Hamilton. 


Read, G. C, 


E. E., 


Elburn, 


Illinois. 


Reese, Ed., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Reinbott, Charles, 


Agron., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Reinhart, M. J., 


C. E., 


Anthon, 


Woodbury. 


Ricker, F. H., , 


M .E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Roy, F. V., 


E. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Rush, H. S., , 


E. E., 


Colfax, 


Jasper. 


Schwarting, W. W„ 


E. E., 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Scott, A. B., 


Min. E., 


Shelby, 


Shelby. 


Scott, C. R., , 


A. H., 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Scott, R. S., 


M. E., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Secor, A. J., 


Hort., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Smith, H. M., 


E. E., 


Nashua, 


Chickasaw. 


Smith, I. R., , 


M. E., 


Milwaukee, 


Wisconsin. 


Stephens, Laura, 


Sc, 


Lohrville, 


Calhoun. 


Stevens, Imogene, G. 


& D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Stillwell, Jay D., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stinson, R. S., 


A. H., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Stouder, K. W., 


Vet., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Stout, E. A., 


A. H., 


Stout, 


Grundy. 


Taylor, F. F., 


M. E., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Tener, W. A., 


A. H., 


Brevard, 


No. Carolina. 


Thomas, E. B., 


A. H., 


Green Mountain 


Marshall. 


Thompson, Winnifred, 






G 


. & D. S., 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Treman, A. J., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Truman, W. D., 


C. E., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


*VanDuzer, Guy, 


Sc, 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Wallace, B. R., 


C. E., 


Albia, 


Monroe. 


Washhurn, Leo, 


Vet., 


Greenwich, 


Ohio. 


Watson, E. B., 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Welch, I. J., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Western, C. A., 


A. H., 


Beaconsfield, 


Ringgold. 


White, H. C, 


Mn. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Wiley, Erma, 


Sc, 


Castana, 


Monona. 


Williams, M. B., 


C. E., 


Manly, 


Worth. 


Wood, F., 


M. E., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Woodard, D. C, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Woodard, Wilton, 


M. E., 


Manilla, 


Crawford. 


Woodman, F. E., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Woodman, Lois, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Woodruff, Chas., 


C. E., 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 


Woodruff, Theresa, G 


. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Zanke, G. J., 


M. E., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 



♦Deceased. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



JUNIOR. 



NAME. 


COUKSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Anderson, J. L., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Austin, H. C, 


Mn. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Babbitt, H. K., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Baker, R. L., 


M. E., 


Columbus Jet., 


Louisa. 


Boyd, Geo. R., 


C. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Buckman, Harry, 


Agron., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Campbell, Foster, 


A. H., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Campbell, Guy R., 


C. E., 


Manilla, 


Crawford. 


Caughey, R. I., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cave, R. A., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chalupnik, J. C, 


A. H., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Chiles, G. S., 


M. E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Clements, C. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coates, L. E., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cogswell, D. H„ 


E, E., 


LeRoy, 


Minnesota. 


Cole, Clarence, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cole, W. B., 


Mn. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Collison, E. P., 


Vet., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Cotton, H. E., 


C. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Crossley, B. W., 


A. H., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Decker, C. W., 


E. E., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Doty, H. L., 


Sc., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Evinger, M. I., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Farnum, R., 


A. H., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Fedson, Jennie, G. 


& D. S., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Fish, Don E., 


Agron., 


Adel, 


Dallas. 


Flynn, Millie, 


Sc, 


Postville, 


Allamakee. 


Ford, C. H., 


C. E., 


Estherville, 


Emmett. 


Forrest, James, 


C. E., 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Foster, W. L., 


C. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Frechtling, C. H., 


Agron., 


Hamilton, 


Ohio. 


Fry, S. A., 


A. H., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Fulton, W. L., 


C. E,, 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Furrow, H. L., 


C. E., 


Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Furrow, R. A., 


C. E., 


Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Gould, H. J., 


C. E., 


New Sharon, 


Mahaska. 


Goulden, R. S., 


M. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Gray, H. W., 


C. E., 


Sergeant Bluff, 


Woodbury. 


Guthrie, Geo. B., 


Sc, 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


Guibert, O. E., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hans sen, H. W., 


C. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Harris, E. N., 


M. E„ 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Heberling, C. A., 


C. E., 


Atalissa, 


Muscatine. 


Hidinger, L. L., 


C. E., 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Humbert, E., 


Agron., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Hutchins, Irving, 


A. H., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Ickis, L. S., 


E. E., 


Creston, 


Union. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



361 



Ingels, J. F., 


A. H., 


Meriden, 


Cherokee. 


Jeffs, Royal, 


Hort, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jenkins, Carl, 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, S. Arthur, 


E. E., 


Marquis, 


Cherokee. 


Johnson, Olla, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnston, J. W., 


C. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Jolls, Ray, 


Vet., 


Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Jory, B. N., 


E. E., 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Kelsey, L. E., 


Agron., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Kenny, G. R., 


E. E., 


Early, 


Sac. 


Kimball, G. W., 


M. E., 


Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


King, M. L., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knox. W. H., 


M. E., 


Marquis, 


Cherokee. 


Kohler, A. R., 


Hort., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Lathrop, H. A., 


C. E., 


Estherville, 


Emmett. 


Lawrence, C. W., 


A. H., 


Braddyville, 


Page. 


Lundeen, H. L., 


A. H., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Lungren, O. E., 


M. E., 


Gowrie, 


Webster. 


Mabie, I. P., 


M. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Madson, B. A., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Madson, Mathilda, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Maxwell, W. D., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McCampbell, A. K., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


McCune, H. A., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McEwen, G. F., 


C. E., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


McGregor, A. H., 


M. E., 


Rockford, 


Illinois. 


Meiser, Frank, 


Dairy, 


Solon, 


Johnson. 


Melhus, Irving, 


Sc, 


Jewell Jet., 


Hamilton. 


Miller, H. M., 


M. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Miller, P. B., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Mllnes, Genevieve, G. 


& D. S., 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Money, F. B., 


C. E., 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Moore, H. I., 


C. E., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Mosier, Mac, 


Mn. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Nelson, Max, 


E. E., 


Pomeroy, 


Calhoun. 


Norman, Elvah, 


Hort., 


Omaha, 


Nebraska. 


Nye, H. V., 


E. E., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Ogden, K. R., 


E. E., 


New Sharon, 


Mahaska. 


Oppenheim, Ramsey, 


Dairy, 


New York City, 


New York. 


Palmer, R. R., 


C. E., 


Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Patch, J. W., 


E. E., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Peckstein, Paul, 


A. H., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Peterson, Carl A., 


E. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Pishel, M. A., 


Mn. E., 


Laurel, 


Marshall. 


Reuling, W. E., 


M. E., 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Rieke, F. C, 


A. H., 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Roberts, G. A., 


A. H., 


Marathon, 


Buena Vista. 


Rowat, Frank, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rubel, W. G., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sanford, A. L., 


M. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 



362 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Sayre, E. A., 


Mn. E., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Schiele, Arthur, 


Agron., 


Montpelier, 


Muscatine. 


Secor, E. L., 


E. E., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Shaw, Genevieve, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Shaw, Winnifred, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Sloane, F. M., 


C. E., 


McGregor, 


Clayton. 


Stuart, LeRoy, 


Agron., 


West Branch, 


Cedar. 


Throckmorton, C. G. 


, E, E., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Tinsley, G. W., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Tracy, Paul B., 


Mn. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Troeger, L. E., 


A. H., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Trostel, Geo., 


A. H., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Walker, Ruth, 


D. S., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Weise, A. M., 


E. E., 


Mclntyre, 


Mitchell. 


White, J. W., 


C. E., 


Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Wilkinson, L. J., 


M. E., 


Milford, 


Dickinson. 


Williams, T. R., 


E. E., 


Sutherland, 


O'Brien. 


Wilson, Mary, 


Sc, 


Cincinnatti, 


Appanoose. 


Wright, L. G., 


C. E., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Wyman, Arthur H., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 




SOPHOMORE. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Achatz, R. B., 


E. E., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Adamson, A. Q., 


C. E., 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Adkins, L. W., 


C. E., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Anderson, A. O., 


Mn. E., 


Lake City, 


Calhoun. 


Anderson, Stella J., 








2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Wapello, 


Louisa. 


Arthur, E. E., 


A. H., 


Millersburg, 


Iowa. 


Ashby, J. B., 


A. H., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Atkinson, O. E., 


E. E„ 


Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


Austin, C. F., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bacchus, J. E., 


A. H., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Bair, Clarence, 


C. E., 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie, 


Baker, Guy G., 


Vet., 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun. 


Barber, W. R., 


C. E., 


Central City, 


Linn. 


Beisell, W. D., 


C. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Belles, B. B., 


C. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson. 


Beyer, Harriette, G 


. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Biller, D. H., 


A. H., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Blackburn, Bess, 








2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Postville, 


Allamakee. 


Blackman, H. A., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Blackwood, R. E., 


Sc, 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Bobst, A. E., 


E. E., 


Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Bolser, M. O., 


E. E., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Bonebright, H., 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bowen, M. R., 


Mn. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



363 



Brandt, J. W., 


C. E., 


Jewell Jet., 


Hamilton. 


Bridges, E. F., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Brintnall, B. P., 


Dairy, 


Winthrop, 


Buchanan. 


Brown, C. E., 


Vet., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Brown, E. J., 


C. E., 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Brown, W. E., 


C. E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Burbridge, H. C, 


C. E., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Burke, Tom, 


M. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Burriss, J. A., 


C. E., 


What Cheer, 


Keokuk. 


Burrows, J. M., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Cameron, E. A., 


E. E., 


Keswick, 


Keokuk. 


Carpenter, J. C, 


C. E., 


Watertown, 


South Dakota. 


Carter, L. E., 


Dairy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cave, J. H., 


C. E., 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Clapper, Leland, 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clark, J. C, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clauson, C. C, 


Mn. E., 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Claxton, R. L, 


A. H., 


Randalia, 


Fayette. 


Clyde, Mary, 2 yr. G, 


. & D. S., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Cohagen, O. A., 


A. H., 


Blakesburg, 


Wapello. 


Cooper, A. R., 


E. E., 


Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


Cooper, H. J., 


E. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Cooper, R. L., 


C. E., 


Winterset, 


Madison. 


Corning, S. T., 


A. H., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Couden, H. N., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Coutts, R. V., 


M. E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Crouse, R. W., 


A. H., 


Dyke, 


Grundy. 


Crum, R. W., 


C. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Cutler, P. G., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Daniels, Arthur, 


C. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Danielson, W. A., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Davenport, Mary, 


Sc., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Deming, R. M., 


C. E., 


Arlington, 


Fayette. 


Dickey, A. J., 


E. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Dudgeon, W. S., 


Sc, 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Dunham, F. B., 


Sc, 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Eastman, W. R., 


Hort, 


Nashua, 


Chickasaw. 


Elliott, Jesse, 


Dairy, 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 


Ellis, L. W., 


Agron., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Elwood, W. D., 


E. E., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Entwhistle, Edith, 








2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Rutland, 


Humboldt. 


Fleming, R. C, 


E. E., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Forbes, W. A., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Forsbeck, C. D., 


C. E., 


Gray, 


Audubon. 


Fraseur, Edith, G. 


& D. S., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Gearhart, F. C, 


Vet., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


George, Edith, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gilbert, P. L., 


Vet., 


Monona, 


Clayton. 


Gillis, R. H., 


Agron., 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 



364 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Graham, Lillyan, 








2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Greer, Floy, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Greer, Shelton, 


C. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Grimm, Irving, 


C. E., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Grove, R. A., 


E. E., 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun. 


Guernsey, S. C, 


A. H., 


Piano, 


Appanoose. 


Guthrie, C. B., 


Hort., 


Coin, 


Page. 


Guthrie, E. S., 


Dairy, 


Coin, 


Page. 


Hall, A. G., 


C. E., 


Moravia, 


Appanoose. 


Hallowell, Ada, G. 


, & D. S., 


Dow City, 


Crawford. 


Hamilton, E. W., 


Agron., 


Hawarden, 


Sioux. 


Harrington, Ada, 








2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Hartsell, 


Colorado. 


Healy, W. H., 


E. E., 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Heisey, C. J., 


A. H., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Henninger, C. E., 


C. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Henningson, H. H., 


E. E., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Herr, Gertrude, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hicks, L. J., 


E. E., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Hoebel, O. L., 


C. E., 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Holden, C. L., 


Sc, 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Hook, F. L., 


C. E., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Howard, H. M., 


C. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Hubbard, H. A., 


E. E., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Hughes, James, 


E. E., 


Strawberry Pt., 


Clayton. 


Hurd, Elmer, 


E. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Jackson, Mae, 


Sc, 


Wood River, 


Nebraska. 


Jones, M. F., 


M. E., 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Kennedy, Maud, G. 


& D. S., 


Collins, 


Story. 


Kibbey, E. A., 


E. E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


King, P. M., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kirkpatrick, R. Z., 


C. E., 


Winfield, 


Henry. 


Lage, John, 


C. E., 


Manning, 


Calhoun. 


Landes, C. C, 


E. E., 


Keosauqua, 


Van Buren. 


Larson, C. W., 


A. H., 


Meltonville, 


Worth. 


LaFever, 0. L., 


E. E., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Leonard, Emma, 


D. S., 


Waukee, 


Dallas. 


Lewis, O. E., 


C. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek, 


Lewis, Pearl, 2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Pueblo, 


Colorado. 


Linderman, L. H., 


E. E., 


Frederickburg, 


Chickasaw. 


Lister, Lily M., 


Sc, 


Newton, 


1 Jasper. 


Long, L., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ludens, David, 


C. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Luhman, L. H.. 


E. E., 


Postville, 


Allamakee. 


Lyder, L. C, 


E. E., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Lyman, R. A., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Madson, Emma, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Maresh, G., 


C. E., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Marsden, W. A., 


E. E., 


Columbus City, 


Louisa. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



365 



Mason, F. D., 


M. E., 


Adair, 


Adair. 


Mather, M. G., 


M. E., 


Clarksville, 


Butler. 


McClean, George T., 


C. E„ 


Washington, 


Washington. 


McCollough, Geo., 


C. E., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


McConnell, E. K., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McFarland, D. H., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


McKinley, Angie, G. 


& D. S., 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


McLean, J. A., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


McPherson, R. M., 


C. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Meyling, T. T., 


M. E., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Miller, F. G., 


Vet., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Miller, M. A., 


C. E., 


Central City. 


Linn. 


Moles, R. D., 


C. E., 


Central City. 


Linn. 


Moorehead, J. A., 


E. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Moreno, Ruben J., 


Vet., 


LaPlata, 


Argentine Rep. 


Morgan, C. K., 


C. E., 


Northwood, 


Worth. 


Mjorris, E. L., 


Agrbn., 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista. 


Mueller, E. W., 


A. H., 


Van Meter, 


Dallas. 


Murphy, L. J., 


Mn. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Nash, Nellie, 2 yr. G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Naylor, E. C, 


A. H., 


Startford, 


Hamilton. 


Naylor, Nellie M., G. 


& D. S., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Neely, J. B., 


C. E., 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 


O'Banion, A. L., 


Vet., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Otis, H. R., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Packard, Walter, E., 


A. H., 


Oak Park, 


Illinois. 


Packer, J. H., 


A. H., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Paine, C. E., 


C. E., 


Burt, 


Kossuth. 


Parsons, B. F., 


E. E., 


Columbus Jet., 


Louisa. 


Paul, Denton, 


C. E., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Perrin, A. C, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Perry, Frank, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Persons, Myrtie, G. 


& D. S., 


Sibley, 


Osceola. 


Peterson, Chester A., 


E. E., 


Slater, 


Story. 


Pettinger, Florence, 








G. 


& D. S., 


Cumberland, 


Cass. 


Pierce, E. H., 


E. E., 


Emporia, 


Kansas. 


Pitts, G. S., 


E. E., 


Alton, 


Sioux. 


Plitt, John, 


C. E., 


Wapello, 


Louisa. 


Powell, A. L., 


A. H., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Prime, Vera, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Prior, LaRue, 


E. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Remington, B. S., 


C. E M 


Neola, 


Pottawattamie. 


Robb, Luella, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Robinson, A. I., 


E. E., 


Stockton, 


Muscatine. 


Roby, Charles A., 


C. E., 


Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Rundall, Mabel, 


Sc, 


Rodman, 


Palo Alto. 


Russell, Claude, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rutledge, I. C, 


M. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Scantlebury, E. C, 


Vet., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Scherling, G., 


E. E., 


Parkersburg, 


Butler. 


Schroeder, W. N., 


M. E., 


Rock Island, 


Illinois. 


Semmons, H. G., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Shotwell, L. W., 


Mn. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Sieben, Ira L., 


A. H., 


Geneseo. 


Illinois. 


Skelley, S. B., 


E. E., 


Lost Nation, 


Clinton. 


Skinner, B. B., 


C. E., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Skubal, F. V., 


C. E., 


Riverside, 


Washington. 


Smith, Earle D., 


Dairy, 


Galva, 


Ada. 


Snavely, W. A., 


E. E., 


Tiffin, 


Johnson. 


Snyder, D. C, 


Sc, 


Center Point, 


Linn. 


Stahl, Charles, 


E. E., 


Walnut, 


Pottawattamie. 


Stange, C. H., 


Vet., 


Lowden, 


Cedar. 


Stanton, Edgar W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stebbins, A. W., 


M. E., 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Stewart, G. H., 


C. E., 


Packwood, 


Jefferson. 


Stewart, Walter C, 


Vet., 


Maynard, 


Fayette. 


Stoufer, D. B., 


M. E., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Taylor, Paul P., 


Vet., 


Randalia, 


Fayette. 


Templeton, E. G., 


A. H„ 


Ames, 


Story. 


Todnem, 0. H., 


E. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Trotter, L. E., 


E. E., 


Ainsworth, 


Washington. 


Tripp, F. C, 


Agron., 


Ruthven, 


Palo Alto. 


Troup, James, 


E. E., 


Sioux City* 


Woodbury. 


Tunis, T. L., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


TJhl, W. P., 


E. E., 


Mitchellville, 


Polk. 


Wallis, R. S., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Walters, Blanch, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Walters, H. L., 


E. E., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Watters, V. G,, 


C. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Watts, Sylvia, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Way, L. C., 


M. E., 


Carson, 


Pottawattamie, 


Wentworth, E. M., 


A. H., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Whallon, Paul, 


E. E., 


Battle Creek, 


Ida. 


Whitacre, R. D., 


E. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


White, Fred, 


C. E., 


Keosauqua, 


Van Buren. 


Whitehead, D. V., 


C. E., 


Pipestone, 


Minnesota. 


Wichman, Jno., 


E. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Willitts, E. V., 


A. H., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Williams, Loretta, G 


. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wilson, Fred W., 


C. E., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Wilson, L. A., 


C. E., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Wilson, L. H., 


M. E., 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Wilson, M. L., 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wilson, Piatt, 


C. E., 


Monteuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Wilson, S. W., 


M. E., 


Denmark, 


Lee. 


Winslow, W. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Woods, J. F., 


E. E., 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Wright, J. G., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Zirbel, C. J., 


M. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



367 





FRESHMAN. 




NAME. 


COUBSE 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Adams, Arthur W., 


E. E. 


Grinnell. 


Poweshiek. 


Alexander, C. 0., 


M. E. 


Ames. 


Story. 


Allen, F. M., 


C. E. 


, Knoxville. 


Marion. 


Allen, G. B., 


Vet. 


, Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Allyn, C. G., 


A. H. 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Amondson, 0. L., 


M. E. 


Dows, 


Wright. 


Anderson, Adolph, 


M. E. 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchell. 


Anderson, A. L., 


A. H. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Anderson, Cecil, 


Vet. 


Jewell Jet., 


Hamilton. 


Andrews, Earle D., 


C. E. 


Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Arnold, F. D., 


C. E. 


Eldon, 


Wapello. 


Arnold, H. A., 


A. H. 


, Oak Park, 


Illinois. 


Arnold, Ray, 


A. H. 


Strawberry Pt., 


Clayton. 


Atherton, A. C, 


E. E. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Aulmann, R k C., 


M. E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Austin, Jessie M., G. 


& D. 8. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Baird, John, 


E. E. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Baker, E. D., 


E. E. 


Stanwood, 


Cedar. 


Bakke, A. L., 


E. E. 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Baldwin, Nan M., G. 


& D. S. 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Balthis, Russell F., 


Hort. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Barclay, M. S., 


A. H. 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Barker, Alfred, 


E. E. 


Brooklyn, 


Poweshiek. 


Bassett, J. S., 


C. E. 


Sheldon, 


O'Brien. 


Batchelder, H. S., 


A. H. 


Lyons, 


Clinton. 


Bates, W. E,, 


A. H. 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 


Baxter, Wm., 


A. H. 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Beard, C. B., 


E. E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Beaumont, L. C, 


Vet. 


Kesley, 


Butler. 


Bechtle, Jennie F. G. 


& D. S. 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Bemis, H. E., 


Vet. 


Cawker City, 


Kansas. 


Benbow, Fred, 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Berggren, A. E., 


M. E. 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Bickett, J. F., 


C. E. 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Biggs, F. G., 


M. E. 


Anita, 


Cass. 


Bishop, Thalia, 


Sc. 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Black, R. E., 


M. E. 


Liscomb, 


Marshall. 


Blackwell, Bert, 


M. E. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Bobst, J. A., 


M. E. 


Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Boden, Oscar, 


C. E. 


Kellogg, 


Jasper. 


Bostwick, G. M., 


Dairy 


Woodbine, 


Harrison. 


Boudinot, H. E., 


M. E. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Bourrassa, A. A., 


M. E. 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Bowman, Hugh N., 


M. E. 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Branch, E. W., 


Sc. 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Breckerbanner, H. E 


i., Vet. 


Lewis, 


Cass. 



368 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Breeden, F. L., 


E. E., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Broadie, R. W., 


C. E., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Brodsky, L. T., 


A. H., 


Plover, 


Pocahontas. 


Bridges, E. F., 


C. E., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Brown, Brevier, 


E. E., 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 


Brugger, Fred, 


E. E., 


Lake City, 


Calhoun. 


Bubke, H. P., 


E. E., 


Battle Creek, 


Ida. 


Bunce, C. L., 


A. H., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Burkhalter, C. S., 


C. E., 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun. 


Burkhart, S. W., 


E. E., 


Zearing, 


Story. 


Bush, C. C. R., 


A. H., 


Washta, 


Cherokee. 


Byers, W. F., 


Mn. E., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Cairns, H. F., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Camburn, H. H., 


A. H., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Cameron, Hurst, 


M. E., 


Monezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Cammack, Earl, 


C. E., 


Salem, 


Henry. 


Campbell, Maud, G. 


& D. S., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Carlson, W. K., 


C. E., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Carlton, J. P., 


Vet., 


Lenox, 


Taylor. 


Carpenter, B. A., 


E. E., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Carstensen, A. N., 


E. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Care, Frank, 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chambers, John A., 


A. H., 


Corwith, 


Hancock. 


Chambers, Willard, 


Vet., 


Farragut, 


Fremont. 


Champlin, H. W., 


A. H., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Christian, H. L., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Churchill, F. C, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clark, Clarissa, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Clark, Perry B., 


M. E., 


Yetter, 


Calhoun. 


Cooper, C. W., 


E. E., 


Blairsburg, 


Wapello. 


Cooper, E. E., 


A. H., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Correll, Lafe, 


E. E., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Courson, R. E., 


Sc, 


Clarion, 


Wright. 


Cox, Frank, 


E. E., 


Adair, 


Adair. 


Cozzens, F. S., 


Vet., 


Colo, 


Story. 


Crabb, Morton, 


A. H., 


Shelbyville, 


Kentucky. 


Craig, Marshall B., 


C. E., 


Allison, 


Butler. 


Craven, F. G., 


Mn. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Crawford, M. O., 


M. E., 


Clarion, 


Wright. 


Cunningham, Don, 


A. H., 


Wayne, 


Nebraska. 


Davis, E. C, 


A. H., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Davis, E. F., 


A. H., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Davis, J. W., 


A. H., 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie. 


Dawson, B. L., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Deiling, N. J., 


Vet., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Dengler, H. D., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Denmead, D. H., 


Agron., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Dewell, N. L., 


Sc, 


Blanchard, 


Page. 


Dewey, F. S., 


E. E., 


Murray, 


Clarke. 


Dickman, H. S., 


E. E., 


Shellsburg, 


Benton. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



Dow, H. J., 




C. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Drennan, R. E., 




A. H. 


, Mt. Etna, 


Adams. 


Dunkelberg, H. A., 


E. E. 


, Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Dunlap, L. B., 




Vet. 


, Shannon City, 


Union. 


Dunn, R. A., 




C. E. 


, Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Elwood, Charles, 




E. E. 


, Sac City, 


Sac. 


Ervin, Verna, 


G. 


& D. S. 


, Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Fairman, C. S., 




C. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Farmer, I. W., 




C. E. 


, Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Fenton, Nelle, 


G. 


& D. S. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Fitts, A. C, 




A. H. 


, Madison, 


South Dakota 


Fitzgerald, John W., 


E. E. 


, Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Forman, Elva, 


G. 


& D. S. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Francis, Will, 




C. E. 


, Earlham, 


Madison. 


Fraseur, Clara, 


G. 


& D. S. 


, Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Freed, Oscar, 




Vet. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Freeland, C. H., 




C. E. 


, Onawa, 


Monona. 


Freeman, J. H., 




E. E. 


, Hazleton, 


Buchanan. 


French, Leslie R. 


» 


C. E. 


, Hawarden, 


Sioux. 


Frudden, C. E., 




M. E. 


, Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Fuhrmeister, Ralph S., A. H. 


, Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Fuller, LeRoy, 




A. H. 


, Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Garberson, L. D., 




Sc. 


, Alta, 


Buena Vista. 


Garner, E. R., 




Hort. 


, Ames. 


Story. 


Gearhart, Ralph 


E., 


Vet. 


, Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Gill, Walden, 




E. E. 


, Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Given, J. A., 




C. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Gourley, C. M., 




Vet. 


, Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Graham, Guy G., 




Vet. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Gray, Roy B., 




E. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Gray, J. B., 




E. E. 


, Morrison, 


Illinois. 


Green, J. R., 




C. E. 


, Onslow, 


Jones. 


Green, S. Rex, 




C. E. 


, Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Greiner, Charles 


T., 


Vet. 


, Blairsburg, 


Hamilton. 


Griggs, E. V., 




E. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Griswold, Donald 


T., 


Agron. 


, Montrose, 


Lee. 


Guernsey, H., 




E. E. 


, Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Guthrie, G. T., 




A. H. 


, Coin, 


Page. 


Hadley, Isom D., 




Agron. 


, Earlham, 


Madison. 


Haefner, Henry, 




Hort. 


, Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Hakes, Arnold, 




Mn. E. 


, Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


Hakes, R. M., 




E. E. 


, Nevada, 


Story. 


Halpenny, R. H., 




E. E. 


, Ames, 


Story. 


Hanson, H. B., 




M. E. 


, Stacyville, 


Mitchell. 


Hargis, Sophis, 


G. 


& D. S. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Harper, H. M., 




E. E. 


, Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Harris, T. T., 




E. E. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Hartley, E. C, 




C. E. 


, Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Haskell, E. S., 




Agron. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Hayden, Ada, 




Sc. 


, Ames, 


Story. 



24 



370 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Hayler, A. P., 


M. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Henderson, E. A., 


C. E., 


Rodney, 


Monona. 


Hewitt, G. M., 


E. E., 


Morning Sun, 


Louisa. 


Higgins, F. H., 


A. H., 


Keswick, 


Keokuk. 


Hilliard, M. C, 


E. E., 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


Hoffert, Charles, 


C. E., 


Spirit Lake, 


Dickinson. 


Hogue, T. F., 


M, E., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Horton, Maude, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hubbard, Homer, 


E. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Huesselman, A., 


E, E., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Huff, C. D., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Hugg, John, 


M. E., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Hunt, C. E., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hurst, Dan W., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hutchinson, Bryce, 


Mn. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ingels, M. R., 


Hort., 


Meriden, 


Cherokee. 


Jackson, L. G., 


C. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Jepson, M. S., 


A. H., 


Moorehead, 


Monona. 


Johnson, A. B., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, . 


Polk. 


Johnson, B. L., 


E. E., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Johnson, C. J., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, 0. W., 


A. H., 


LeGrand, 


Marshall. 


Jones, G. L., 


Sc, 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Jordan, Frank, 


M. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Jory, H. W., 


C. E., 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Kelso, M. D., 


A. H., 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Kettering, Sarah, 


D. S. 


Lisbon, 


Linn. 


Kilborne, Luella, 


D. S., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Kildee, H. H., 


A. H., 


Osage, 


Mitchell. 


Kimball, Florence, 


M. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie, 


Kingsbury, Leonard, 


E. E., 


West Branch, 


Cedar. 


Kinnebrew, Claud, 


Agron., 


Corsicana, 


Texas. 


Kleniewska, Boza, 


Agron., 


Russia-Poland, 


Europe. 


Knapp, S. A., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Knowles, R. S., 


E. E., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Koch, W. J., 


M. E., 


Akron, 


Plymouth. 


Koll, Harry, 


Vet., 


Walnut, 


Pottawattamie, 


Kreul, A. H., 


E. E., 


Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


Kulp, A. I., 


Vet., 


Adel, 


Dallas. 


Kupfer, C. A., 


Hort., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Lambert, Earl, 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Lampman, R., 


E. E., 


West Bend, 


Palo Alto. 


Langlois, E. C, 


Hort., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Laughlin, C. J., 


C. E., 


Sloan, 


Woodbury. 


Lawler, Katie, G. 


& D. S., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Leckliter, Harlan, 


C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams. 


Leinen, L. M., 


Vet., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Liken, Frank, 


M. E., 


Gray, 


Audubon. 


Lindberg, I. A., 


E. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Lindley, Earl, 


A. H., 


Hamilton, 


Missouri. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



371 



Little, H. A., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Livingstone, Esther, 








G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lodwick, G., 


Mn. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Luberger, H. S., 


A. H., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Lyons, R. T„ 


A. H., 


Center Junct., 


Jones. 


Mack, F. W., 


E. E., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Mack, G. H., 


C. E., 


Dows, 


Wright. 


Macomber, Stanley, 


C. E., 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Madson, Anna, G' 


: & D. S w 


Ames, 


Story. 


Maresh, Frank, 


C. E., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Marsh, F. E., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Mason, R. J., 


A. H., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Mayne, W. V., 


C. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


McArthur, Wm., 


A. H., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


McBirney, H. R., 


C. E., 


Conrad, 


Grundy. 


McBurney, W. S., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


McChesney, M. A., 


M. E., 


Burt, 


Kossuth. 


McCormick, C. M., 


E. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


McKeen, Jessie, 


E. E., 


Tama, 


Tama. 


McKemey, C. L., 


C. E., 


Fairfield, 


Jefferson, 


McKibben, H. B., 


M. E., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Meickley, K. B., 


Agroh., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Meier, Vina, G. 


& D. S., 


Postville. 


Allamakee. 


Miles, S. W., 


C. E., 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Millard, Frank, 


C. E., 


Eldon, 


Wapello. 


Miller, Howard C, 


C. E., 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


Miller, Laura, G. 


& D. S., 


Oxford, 


Johnson. 


Miller, L. C, 


E. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Minert, Jessie, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Monroe, C. F., 


A. H., 


Greene, 


Butler. 


Moore, R. S., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Moore, W. E., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Morris, Delia, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Mosher, H. E., 


E. E M 


Ames, 


Story. 


Murphy, J. L., 


A. H., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Mutch, G., 


Agron., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Myers, C. J., 


A. H., 


LeGrand, 


Marshall. 


Nelson, J. M., 


Vet, 


Brooklyn, 


Poweshiek. 


Ness, Henry, 


A. H., 


Somers, 


Calhoun. 


Newcomer, A. C, 


E. E., 


Newburg, 


Jasper. 


Newlon, Emily, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Newlon, Mae, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Nye, R. G., 


A. H., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


O'Donnell, R. F., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Olson, O. A., 


E. E., 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista. 


Oransky, Abe, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Ottosen, P. H., 


C. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Overley, F. L., 


Sc, 


Center Junct., 


Jones. 


Patton, D. S., 


Sc, 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 



372 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Patton, M. C, 


C. E. 


, Newton, 


Jasper. 


Paulson, Fred, 


E. E. 


, Avoca, 


Pottawattamie, 


Paulson, Leonard, 


C. E. 


, Triumph, 


Minnesota. 


Peek, Welton, 


A. H. 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Perry, J. B., 


M. E. 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Peters, W. H., 


A. H. 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Peterson, J. B., 


E. E. 


Morrison, 


Illinois. 


Peterson, W. A., 


C. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Phillips, C. J., 


C. E. 


Clarence, 


Cedar. 


Phillips, Howard, 


A. H. 


Maquoketa, 


Jackson. 


Potter, Lena, G. 


&D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Powers, George, 


C. E. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Price, W. A., 


C. E. 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Pullen, M. W., 


E. E. 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Quigley, J. H., 


M. E. 


McGregor, 


Clayton. 


Rail, Ellis, 


A. H. 


Birmingham, 


Van Buren. 


Randall, W. W., 


E. E. 


Rockwell City, 


Calhoun. 


Rea, Florence, G. 


&D. S. 


Holstein, 


Ida. 


Renken, E. T., 


M. E. 


Parkersburg, 


Butler. 


Reppert, P. L., 


E. E. 


Cumberland, 


Cass. 


Reuling, R. E., 


M. E. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Rew, Warren, 


A. H. 


Corydon, 


Wayne. 


Reynolds, John F., 


C. E. 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Robertson, R. D., 


C. E. 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie, 


Robinson, H. E., 


Mn. E. 


Sloan, 


Woodbury. 


Rowat, J. F., 


C. E. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Rudd, Ross, 


E. E. 


Dow City, 


Crawford. 


Sackrison, Peter, 


M. E. 


Williams, 


Hamilton. 


Sanders, M. 0., 


C. E. 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Schaeffer, L. L., 


Hort. 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Schantz, L. C, 


E. E. 


Wayland, 


Henry. 


Scherff, F. C. F., 


A. H. 


Minden, 


Pottawattamie, 


Schlegel, Ella, 


Sc. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Schlegel, Mary, 


Sc. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Schmidt, Will, 


C. E. 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie. 


Scholten, H. M., 


C. E. 


Alton, 


Sioux. 


Schworm, F. G., 


C. E. 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Schofield, Wm. J., 


C. E. 


Strawberry Pt., 


Clayton. 


Scott, C. J., 


Vet. 


Armstrong, 


Emmett. 


Scott, N. H., 


A. H. 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Secor, Florence, G. 


& D. S. 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Seeley, Burton, 


Vet. 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Sellers, L. C, 


C. E. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Shannon, C. W., 


M. E. 


Grant City, 


Sac. 


Shaw, R. P., 


E. E. 


Carnforth, 


Poweshiek. 


Shinkle, Margaret E, 






G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Shumway, C. R., 


A. H. 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Simpson, E. J., 


E. E. 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Slaught, H. M., 


E. E. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



373 



Smith, Ada, 


G. & D. S., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Smith, B. R., 


C. E., 


Ft. Madison, 


Lee. 


Smith, C. C, 


A. H., 


Nashua, 


Chickasaw. 


Smith, T. W., 


E. E., 


Renwick, 


Humboldt. 


Smith, Wilbur, 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sones, C. M., 


E. E., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Soukup, Edw., 


E. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Sparks, Cliff, 


Vet., 


Linnville, 


Jasper. 


Sparks, Mary, 


G. & D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Spencer, Frank, 


M. E., 


Neola, 


Pottawattamie. 


Stelle, A. C, 


Agron., 


Pasedena, 


California. 


Stephens, S. A., 


E. E., 


Ainsworth, 


Washington. 


Stevens, John E., 


Mn. E., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Stone, 0. R., 


E. E., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Storms, Lillian, 


G. & D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Strickler, W. L., 


E. E., 


Sibley, 


Osceola. 


Sturgeon, R., 


E. E., 


Clarion, 


Wright. 


Swift, Gaillard, 


Sc. & Ag., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Symonds, F. W., 


E. E., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Taylor, C. G., 


M. E., 


Sibley, 


Osceola 


Templeton, M. S., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Templeton, R. M., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Terrill, M. T., 


C. E., 


Winterset, 


Madison. 


Thayer, Starr, 


E. E., 


Rock Valley, 


Sioux. 


Thompson, A. W., 


E. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Tiara, Frank, 


C. E., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Titus, Charles, 


Vet., 


Rhodes, 


Marshall. 


Tow, Edward, 


Vet., 


Norway, 


Benton. 


Trout, Shelley, 


E. E., 


Perry, 


.Jallas. 


Tunicliff, H. E., 


M. E., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Ullman, Roy, 


E. E., 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Upton, Louisa, 


Sc, 


Fayette, 


Fayette, 


Van Brunt, E. S., 


E. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie. 


Vance, T. F., 


Sc, 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Vandenburgh, E. 


C, C. E., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Van Epps, Lee, 


Vet., 


Ames. 


Story. 


VanHorne, Ralph, 


E. E., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Van Marter, C. C, 


C. E., 


Sloan, 


Woodbury. 


Veach, H. S., 


C. E., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Vermall, D. E.. 


Vet., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Waggoner, J. E., 


M. E., 


Primghar, 


O'Brien. 


Wagner. C. W., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wagner, H. W., 


E. E., 


Calamus, 


Clinton. 


Wambeam, H. L, 


E. E., 


Kensett, 


Worth. 


Wasem, H. H., 


E. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Waugh, E. N., 


A. H., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Wertz, O. H., 


A. H., 


Russell, 


Lucas. 


Westfall, W. E., 


A. H., 


Toledo, 


Tama, 


Wettstein, A. A., 


M. E., 


in ewton, 


Jasper. 


Whannell, H. J., 


E. E., 


Traer, 


Tama. 



374 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Wheeler, Delbert, 


C. E., 


Ireton, 


Sioux, 


White, E. L., 


Sc, 


(Jorydon, 


Wayne. 


White, J. F., 


Agron., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


White, Van., 


C. E., 


Washington, 


Washington. 


Wieland, Albert, 


M. E., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Willett, Tom, 


Mn. E., 


Decorah, 


Winneshiek, 


Williams, J. R., 


A. H., 


Postville, 


Allamakee, 


Williams, P. R., 


E. E., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Wills, Geo. M., 


E. E., 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


Wilson, Harriett B., 








G. 


& D. S., 


Hedrick, 


Keokuk. 


Winkelhaus, L. C, 


C. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Winslow, L. M., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wolfe, Frank, 


Vet., 


Shannon City, 


Union. 


Wood, Asa, 


C. E., 


Garner, 


Hancock. 


Wood, C. R., 


C. E., 


Corwith, 


Hancock. 


Woodruff, J. D., 


Sc, 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Wright, John, 


C. E., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Wuestenberg, 0. R., 


M. E., 


Eldridge, 


Scott. 


Yarnell, D. L., 


C. E., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Yocom, R. G., 


E. E., 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Zentmire, Frank, 


A. H., 


Oakland, 


Pottawattamie, 


Zilliox, C. T., 


Agron., 


Hamilton, 


Ohio. 


Zimmerman, Phoebe, 








G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Zorn, H. E., 


M. E., 


Montezuma, 


Poweshiek. 


Zumwalt, A. R., 


Vet., 


Ames, 


Story. 




ACADEMIC. 




NAME. 


COURSE. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Abrahamson, J., 


E. E., 


Morning Sun, 


Louisa. 


Ady, James, 


C. E., 


Atalissa, 


Muscatine. 


Albright, Ralph, 


C. E., 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Alexander, Geo. W., 


E. E., 


Fremont, 


Mahaska. 


Alexander, Rolla, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Allen, A. L., 


Sc, 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Allen, Frances, 


Sc, 


Roland, 


Story. 


Alyea, C. W., 


A. H., 


Waterloo, 


Black Hawk. 


Anderson, F. H., 


C. E., 


Colfax, 


Jasper. 


Anderson, Gurine, 


Sc, 


Stanhope, 


Hamilton. 


Bader, Gottliet, 


E. E„ 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Baird, Earl S., 


E. E., 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Baker, H. Ream, 


C. E., 


Jefferson, 


Greene. 


Baldwin, W. A., 


E. E., 


Bradyville, 


Page. 


Baxter, Sam, 


A. H., 


Princeton, 


Scott. 


Beadles, E. L., 


Mn. E., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Bek, Hugh E., 


E. E., 


Seward, 


Nebraska. 


Benson, Joseph, 


E. E., 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Bentley, Con, 


A. H., 


Aledo, 


Illinois. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



375 



Bernick, F., 


E. E., 


Buffalo, 


Scott 


Berryhill, V. L., 


E. E„ 


Parnell, 


Iowa. 


Bielenberg, Carl F., 


E. E., 


Keystone, 


Benton. 


Billedo, Mariano, 


Agron., 


Banqurd, 


Philippine II 


Black, Clyde, 


C. E., 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Bodwell, R. E., 


E. E., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Booth, Francis, 


C. E., 


Wiota, 


Cass. 


Bowie, George W., 


A. H., 


Atalissa, 


Muscatine. 


Bradley, F. E., 


M. E., 


Baldwin, 


Jackson. 


Brown, Frank J., 


Mn. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Brown, Roy S., 


E. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Blubacher, R. R., 


C. E., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Buchanan, H. S., 


C. E., 


Denver, 


Colorado. 


Buckman, A. W., 


E. E., 


Calamus, 


Clinton. 


Budd, James, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Buell, W. E., 


C. E., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Burkhart, Roy F., 


E. E., 


Hawkeye, 


Fayette. 


Butts, Mabel, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Campbell, Carlyle, 


Dairy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cecil, Homer, 


A. H., 


Hamilton, 


Ohio. 


Christenson, L. H., 


C. E., 


Arthur, 


Ida. 


Clark, M. C, 


E. E., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Clausen, B. J., 


E. E., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Clauson, V. C, 


Mn. E., 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Clayton, Elmer, 


E. E., 


Kelley, 


Story. 


Closson, Harold, 


A. H., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Coffin, Martha, G. 


& D. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cole, Harold, 


Sc, 


Thurman, 


Fremont. 


Collins, Edgar V., 


Agron., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Connell, Daniel, 


C. E., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Connell, John, 


C. E,, 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Connelly, H. H., 


E. E., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Corneliussen, F. C, 


Sc, 


Story City, 


Story. 


Cort, E. G., 


A. H., 


Huron, 


So. Dakota. 


Corwin, Frelon R., 


A. H., 


Rock Valley, 


Sioux. 


Cox., I. W., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cox, Lawrence, 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cripliver, Frank, 


M. E., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Cullen, Arthur E., 


M. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Cunningham, A. H., 


C. E., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Cutler, W. McL., 


E. E., 


Dubuque, 


Dubuque. 


Darling, Eugene, 


A. H., 


Fonda, 


Pocahontas. 


Davis, Guy, 


Agron., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Davis, J. S., 


C. E., 


Corning, 


Adams 


Demary, Lewis, 


M. E., 


Seney, 


Plymouth. 


Dixon, Vera, 


Sc, 


Sac City, 


Sac 


Doaden, H., 


M. E., 


George, 


Lyon. 


Dorman, E. D., 


C. E., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Dreher, Genevieve, G 


. & D. S., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Dunham, Ralph, 


A. H., 


Dunlap, 


Harrison. 



Ids. 



376 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Du Val, Eugene, 


M. E., 


Hastings, 


Mills. 


Eckels, Frank, 


Sc., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Edwards, Austin, 


M. E., 


Buck Grove, 


Crawford. 


Eikenberry, L., 


Sc, 


Greene, 


Butler. 


Ellingwood, B. R., 


E. E., 


Leon, 


Decatur. 


Elliott, L. N., 


A. H., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Eyres, R. W., 


M. E., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Fairbanks, Allan T., 


A. H., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


Farnsworth, Elizabeth, 






G. 


& D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Farnsworth, F. B., 


M. E., 


Galva, 


Ida. 


Farnsworth, M. 0., G. & D. S., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Fawley, Bert, 


C. E., 


Springvale, 


Linn. 


Florencourt, F. B., 


E. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Ford, J. C, 


C. K, 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Forman, Lee W., 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Franklin, Ralph H., 


C. E., 


Clearfield, 


Taylor. 


Fuller, Ralph, 


E. E., 


Williams, 


Hamilton. 


Furman, Addie, G 


. & D. S., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Garmire, C. F., 


E. E., 


Audubon, 


^udubon. 


Garver, Samuel, 


Hort., 


Farrington, 


Van Buren. 


Gethmann, Charles, 


M. E., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Gilbert, Guy, 


A. H., 


Gilbert, 


Story. 


Gillette, Milly, 


Sc, 


Fostoria, 


Clay. 


Gilmore, Wm. J., 


C. E., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Given, Jean, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Gadeken, August, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Godden, Carl, 


E. E., 


Dows, 


Wright. 


Godfrey, J. E., 


M. E„ 


Griswold, 


Cass. 


Goodrich, John, 


Agron., 


Keokuk, 


Lee. 


Graham, M. L., 


C. E., 


Rongis, 


Wyoming. 


Grant, Florence, G 


, & D. S., 


ROlfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Greene, R. J., 


A. H., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Grimes, Ethel, 


Sc, 


Montrose, 


Lee. 


Hale, J. A., 


E. E., 


Tripoli, 


Bremer. 


Halford, Robert, 


A. H., 


Manning, 


Carroll. 


Hall, Herman, 


M. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hammer, L. G., 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Harris, T. T., 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Harris, G. D., 


M. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Hawbaker, E. H., 


A. H., 


Stratford, 


Hamilton. 


Haugas, Ella M., 


Sc, 


Henderson, 


Mills. 


Hesse, Fred W., 


A. H., 


Greub, 


Wyoming. 


Hill, A. F., 


M. E., 


Ames, 


btory. 


Hills, Mamie, G. 


& D. S., 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Hills, Olive, G. 


& D. S., 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Hitchcock, Rex B., 


M. E„ 


Greenfield, 


Adair. 


Hoffman, W. G., 


Sc, 


Beloit, 


Wisconsin. 


Hofmann, George, 


M. E., 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Hoggatt, Esmond, 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



377 



Hollister, Olivia, 


D. S., 


Des Moines. 


Polk. 


Holt, Ed., 


M. E., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Homeman, Herman, 


A. H., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Hopkins, K. M., 


E. E., 


Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Horn, M. R., 


A. H., 


Douds-Leando, 


Van Buren. 


Hummel, F. L., 


M. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Huxtable, E. C, 


M. E,, 


Newell, 


Buena Vista. 


Igo, Roy, 


A. H., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Ines, Leon, 


C. E., 


Sinait, Ilocos, 


Philippine Ids, 


Jamison, F. H., 


E. E., 


Oelwein, 


Fayette. 


Jeanson, R. E., 


A. H.. 


ijes Moines, 


Polk. 


Jepson, A. O., 


E. E., 


Sioux City, 


Woodbury. 


Johnson, W. E., 


E. E., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Jones, Charles H., 


E. E., 


Minburn, 


Dallas. 


Jones, Frank, 


C. E., 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Jones, Gertrude, 


Sc, 


Redfield, 


Dallas. 


Jones, H. B., 


M. E., 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Ka Del, Orpha, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kemp, Ward, 


A. H., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


King, J. N., 


C. E., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Kirkpatrick, K. A., 


Hort., 


South English, 


Keokuk. 


Knoche, A., 


E. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Knowles, Frank, 


M. E., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Knox, R. B., 


M. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


Knudson, M. N., 


E. E., 


Milford, 


Dickinson. 


Koester, C. H., 


M. E., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Kruel, A. H., 


E. E., 


Laurens, 


Pocahontas. 


Kruse, J. H., 


E. E., 


West Side, 


Crawford. 


Kuebler, L. J., 


Agron., 


Calamus, 


Clinton. 


Kyhl, Louis, 


E. E., 


Miles, 


Jackson. 


Lackey, A. J., 


C. E., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Langwill, "Wm., 


Dairy, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Langwill, W. G., 


Dairy, 


Rockford, 


Illinois. 


Lau, Oscar M., 


C. E., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Lidvall, Ed., 


C. E., 


Dayton, 


Webster. 


Lieberknecht, Arthur, 


A. H., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Lieberknecht, Ernest, 


E. E., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Long, George, 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Long, Robert J., 


A. H., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Loring, David M., 


C. E., 


Lone Tree, 


Johnson. 


Loudermilk, H., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Lynch, Joe, 


E. E., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Magsaysay, Ambrosia, 


C. E., 


San Marcelino, 


Philippine Ids. 


Maine, Kenneth, 


M. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Martin, Helen, G. < 


& D. S., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Marshall, C, 


A. H., 


Gilmore City, 


Pocahontas. 


Mason, L. N., 


A. H., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Matter, Otto, 


E. E., 


Polk City, 


Polk, 


Maynard, R. N., 


M. E., 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee. 


McBurney, Eva L., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 



378 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



McCord, Bradley, 


M. E., 


Harlan. 


Shelby. 


MeCulloch, D. E., 


A. H., 


Donaldson, 


Lee. 


McDonald, R. G., 


E, E. 


Florence, 


Colorado. 


McElhinney, Ralph, 


A. H. 


Dysart, 


Tama. 


McEwen, Philip H., 


E. E. 


Plover, 


Pocahontas. 


MeKibben, Guy, 


M. E. 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


McKimm, F. A., 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


McMillan, Leslie E., 


Agron. 


Vinton, 


Benton. 


McNeal, Will, 


E. E. 


Cherokee, 


Cherokee, 


McSweeney, Henry, 


C. E. 


Westgate, 


Fayette. 


Meinhardt, Hugh, 


E. E. 


Donaldson, 


Lee. 


Merrill, J. W., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Metcalf, J. P., 


A. H. 


Paullina, 


O'Brien. 


Michaelson, Walter M 


., C. E. 


Gilbert, 


Story. 


Miller, Philip W., 


C. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Milligan, F. R., 


E. E. 


Hiteman, 


Monroe. 


Mills, A. D., 


M. E. 


Central City, 


Linn. 


Milton, I. W., 


E. E. 


, Stanwood, 


Cedar. 


Mollyneaux, Guy, 


Mn. E. 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Mondroenedo, Marino M., 








A. H. 


Gaunisabela, 


Philippine Ids. 


Morado, Ciriacas, 


A. H. 


Nipabatangas, 


Philippine Ids. 


Monroe, C. R., 


E. E. 


, Garden Grove, 


Decatur. 


Moody, J. G., 


E. E, 


Cedar, 


Mahaska. 


Moore, L. J., 


E. E. 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Morrison, G. W., 


M. E. 


Altoona, 


Polk. 


Naiden, Fred, 


Sc. 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 


Nelson, Lawrence A., 


A. H. 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Nichols, C. S., 


E. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Nichols, T. C, 


C. E. 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Nicholson, Edith, 


Sc. 


Ralston, 


Carroll. 


Nicholson, N. J., 


M. E. 


Scran ton, 


Greene. 


Ogle, Margaret, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Okey, C. W., 


C. E. 


Prescott, 


Adams. 


Oliver, Florentine, 


M, E. 


Nuera, Caceres, 


Philippine Ids. 


O'Reilly, D. 0., 


E. E. 


Vail, 


Crawford. 


Orr, Robert, 


C. E. 


St. Francisville, 


Missouri. 


Overbaugh, Tom, 


C. E. 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Packer, E. E., 


A. H. 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Packman, M. E., 


E. E. 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Payne, Rodney, 


E. E. 


Moville, 


Woodbury. 


Paine, Roger, 


A. H. 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Palmer, Maude L., 


Sc. 


Deep River, 


Poweshiek. 


Parsons, F. W., 


C. E. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Phillips, T. J., 


E. E. 


Hiteman, 


Monroe. 


Pickworth, E. A., 


C. E. 


Minden, 


Jones. 


Pieper, Fred, 


A. H. 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie 


Platner, C. R., 


M. E. 


Libertyville, 


Pottawattamie, 


Pollock, Ivan, 


C. E. 


Anamosa, 


Jefferson. 


Polzier, Elmer H., 


M. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



379 



Pratt, Len, 


Agron., 


Traer, 


Tama. 


Pray, Gilbert, 


M. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Prill, Margaret, G. 


& D. S., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Randall, Alpheus, 


M. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Reigard, Fay 0., 


Sc, 


Spirit Lake, 


Dickinson. 


Remington, Harry, 


Sc, 


Mt. Auburn, 


Benton. 


Rice, Dora, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Riedesel, R. C, 


M. E., 


Charter Oak, 


Crawford. 


Rogers, J. H., 


C. E., 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie, 


Rogers, R. D., 


C. E., 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Rolph, James M., 


E. E., 


Little Sioux, 


Harrison. 


Roman, B. G., 


M. E., 


Clinton, 


Clinton. 


Rounds, C. E., 


M. E., 


Hiteman, 


Mjonroe. 


Rust, W. D., 


A. H.» 


Newell, 


Buena Vista. 


Sanborn, H. G., 


C. E., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Sanders, J. S., 


A. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Sauerberg, C. G., 


M. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Saul, W. I., 


E. E., 


Carroll, 


Carroll. 


Schelm, Mattie, 


Sc, 


Charter Oak, 


Crawford. 


Schnaidt, Wm. F., 


A. H., 


Baxter, 


Jasper. 


Schoonover, F., 


M. E., 


Stacyville, 


Mitchell. 


Schregardus, Dirk, 


E. E„ 


Prairie City, 


Jasper. 


Scott, W. R., 


A. H., 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Sexsmith, Perlee, 


E. E., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Sharp, Omer, 


Sc, 


Dows City, 


Crawford. 


Shinkle, Martha, G. 


& D. a., 


Amet 


Story. 


Shirley, Will, 


C. E., 


Minburn, 


Dallas. 


Shoals, J. W., 


A. H., 


Valiant, 


Indian Terri. 


Schultz, Chester, 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Simmons, Clark, 


E. E., 


Macksburg, 


Madison. 


Smith, F. S., 


Sc, 


Riverton. 


Fremont. 


Smith, R. R., 


M. E., 


Woodward, 


Dallas. 


Spangler, G. W., 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stafford, H. A., 


C. E., 


Blairsburg, 


Hamilton. 


Starr, M. B., 


E.E., 


Pocahontas, 


Pocahontas. 


St. Clair, Fred, 


Sc, 


Mt. Auburn, 


Benton. 


Sterling,, G. C, 


E. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Stockslager, Ray, 


E. E„ 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Stoddard, W. E., 


Agron., 


Tama, 


Tama. 


Strickler, Paul, 


A. H., 


Centerville, 


Appanoose. 


Swanson, C. A., 


M. E., 


Fremont, 


Mahaska. 


Swatosh, J. S., 


E. E., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Thompson, A. P., 


C. E., 


Ft. Dodge, 


Webster. 


Tiara, Bessie, 


Sc, 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Trullinger, S. B., 


C. E., 


Farragut, 


Fremont. 


Upham, Glenn O., 


C. E., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Vangilst, Peter, 


M. E., 


Kilduff, 


Jasper. 


VanHouten, Abi, G, 


, & D. S., 


Lenox, 


Taylor. 


Velander, Verner, 


M. E., 


Stanton, 


Montgomery. 


Walston, Luverna, 


D. S., 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 



380 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Watts, Ruth, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Watts, T. F., 


A. H. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Waycott, Earl, 


M. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Welday, Ralph, 


E. E. 


Libertyville, 


Jefferson. 


Westphal, Jennie, G &. D. S. 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


White, Hazel, G. 


& D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


White, Sadie, 


Sc. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Williams, Ivan, 


Sc. 


Pleasantville, 


Marion. 


Williams, Jennie, G. 


&D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Williams, L. A., 


E. E. 


Council Bluffs, 


Pottawattamie 


Wilson, F. H., 


A. H. 


Manning, 


Carroll. 


Wilson, J. G., 


A. H. 


Ottumwa, 


Wapello. 


Wilson, Osee, 


Sc. 


Seymour, 


Wayne. 


Wilson, R. G., 


Agron. 


Humboldt, 


Humboldt. 


Wood, A. B., 


C. E. 


Fonda, 


Pocahontas. 


Woodruff, E. B., 


Sc. 


, Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Woody, J. G., 


E. E. 


, Cedar, 


Mahaska. 


Worden, H. R., 


A. H. 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wright, Forest, 


C. E. 


, Corning, 


Adams. 


Yaunt, Glen, 


Mn. E. 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Yeomans, H. C, 


M. E. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Young, Charles H., 


C. E. 


Muscatine, 


Muscatine. 


Young, C. R., 


A. H. 


, Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Young, Fred, Sc 


. & Ag. 


, Collins, 


Story. 


Zellhorfer, C. C., 


C. E. 
SF 


, Cedar Falls, 
►ECIALS. 


Black Hawk. 


NAME. 


COURSE 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Adams, Ella C, 


D. S. 


, Sigourney, 


Keokuk. 


Adamson, O. E., 


A. H. 


, Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Agne, Burdette, 


A. H. 


, Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Agne, Glen, 


A. H. 


, Mechanicsville, 


Cedar. 


Anderson, Charles, 


Mn. E. 


, Hilton, 


Monroe. 


Anderson, G., 


M. E. 


, Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Ankeney, Margaret, 


D. S. 


, Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Arey, Anna, 


D. S. 


, Sedalia, 


Missouri. 


Arnold, Clarence, 


Agron. 


, Klemme, 


Hancock. 


Bacon, W. C, 


A. H. 


New York, 


New York. 


Bakke, Olaf, 


Dairy 


, Slavanger, 


Norway. 


Ballard, W. L., 


Agron. 


, McKeesport, 


Pennsylvania. 


Barnes, R. E., 


M- E. 


, Marquis, 


Cherokee. 


Barney, W. V., 


A. H. 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Battles, D. C, 


Agron. 


Maquoketa, 


Jackson. 


Beyer, A. R., 


Dairy 


Edgewood, 


Clayton. 


Bickel, K. D., 


Sc. 


, McGregor, 


Clayton. 


Blumer, H. H., 


A. H. 


Luverne, 


Kossuth. 


Bonner, R. A., 


Agron. 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Brich, P. A., 


Agron. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Burton, F. W., 


Agron. 


Grant, 


Montgomery. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



381 



Campbell, Fae, 


Sc., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Campfield, Grace, G. 


& D. S., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Carey, J. W., 


Mn. E., 


xveb, 


Wapello. 


Caughey, Alice, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chapman, T. C, 


Mn. E., 


Hilton, 


Monroe. 


Chenoweth, Grace, 


D. S., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Churchill, F. G., 


Agron., 


Sewal, 


Wayne. 


Copeland, C. B., 


M. E., 


Chariton, 


Lucas. 


Coverdale, C. F., 


A. H., 


Delmar, 


Clinton. 


Coverdale, J. W., 


A. H., 


Delmar, 


Clinton. 


Crowder, R. G., 


Mn. E., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Cunningham, S. B., 


Agron., 


Granger, 


Dallas. 


Cutler, P. D., 


Agron., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Davenport, Lora, 


D. S., 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Davis, H. W., 


A. H., 


Buffalo, 


Wyoming. 


Dean, Emil, 


Agron., 


Unionville, 


Appanoose. 


Dirrim, G. D., 


Agron., 


Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Douglass, W. H., 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Duncan, J. H., 


A. H., 


Allerton, 


Wayne. 


Dunkle, W. G., 


Agron., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Duysters, P. D., 


A. H., 


Haelan, 


Belgium. 


Dyer, J. N., 


A. H., 


St. Louis, 


Missouri. 


Eddleman, M. R., 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ellsworth, Fred, 


C. E., 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


Evans, J. L., 


Agron., 


Emerson, 


Mills. 


Field, Blanche E., 


D. S., 


Grinnell, 


Poweshiek. 


Frybarger, B. M., 


A. H., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Frye, George D., 


A. H., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Fuchs, O. C, 


A. H., 


Wall Lake, 


Sac. 


Gamble, J. B., 


A. H., 


Wheatland, 


Clinton. 


Gerlaugh, Arthur, 


A. H., 


Osborn, 


Ohio. 


Graham, E. H., 


A. H., 


Mt. Carroll, 


Illinois. 


Graham, L. L., 


Sc, 


Coon Rapids, 


Carroll. 


Haberkorn, Julien, 


Agron., 


Primghar, 


O'Brien. 


Haines, R. H., 


A. H., 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista. 


Harrison, F. C, 


Agron., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 


Harvey, Maye, 


Sc, 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Hawn, J. A., 


A. H., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Higgins, Fosse, 


A. H., 


Keswick, 


Keokuk. 


Hills, Leona, G. 


& D. S., 


Stuart, 


Guthrie. 


Hopkins, A. W., 


A. H., 


Morrisonville, 


Wisconsin. 


Huxsol, Amelia, 


Sc, 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Hovland, P. B., 


M. E., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Ineck, Anna, 


Sc, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jeffry, Howard, 


A. H., 


Oxford Junct, 


Jones. 


Jenkins, John, 


A. H., 


Columbus Jet., 


Louisa. 


Johnston, E. W., 


Agron., 


Oak Park, 


Illinois. 


Jones, J. C, 


Sc, 


Cedar Falls, 


Black Hawk. 


Jorgenson, Anthony, 


A. H., 


Vermillion, 


So. Dakota. 


Kasten, J. H., 


A. H., 


Ames. 


Story. 



382 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Kenyon, Floyd, 
Knight, Emma, G. 
Knorr, J. G., 
Lambert, J. S., 
Lanphear, F. W., 
Latimer, B. J., 
Lauther, I. S., 
Lawler, F. J., 
Lehfeldt, William, 
Lewis, Louise, G. 
Lindmeier, H. N., 
Lister, Mary E., 
Low, H. L., 
Lucas, Carey A., 
Lynn, Wm., 
Maharg, Minnie, G. 
Mallette, F. G., 
Martin, Blanch, G. 
Martin, G. L., 
McLaughlin, W. D., 
Miller, E. E., 
Miller, L. J., 
Moody, Thomas, 
Moore, Emma, 
Morgan, C. T., 
Myers, Ruth M., 
Newcomer, Charles, 
Overly, J. R., 
Paddock, Flora, 
Parkinson, J. R., 
Parkinson, Kenton, 
Pike, Hattie A., G. 
Pullen, G. C, 
Ranney, F. E., 
Rausch, Mary F, G. 
Reading, Charles, 
Rehder, A. E., 
Richeson, R. E., 
Richey, R. W., 
Roberts, C. A., 
Robinson, Delia, G. 
Rollins, J. C, 
Rosenstiel, J. H., 
Rueda, Grace R., G. 
Rueda, Remigio, 
Salisbury, H. J., 
Sampson, Frank, 
Schonboe, L. B., 
Schuldt, Ben, 
Shinkle, I. B., 



Agron., 


Wichita, 


Guthrie. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


A. H., 


Fontanelle, 


Adair. 


E. E., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


E. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Mn. E., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Agron., 


Ft. Madison, 


Lee. 


Agron., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Mn. E., 


Dennison, 


Crawford. 


& D. S., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Agron., 


Lyons, 


Clinton. 


D. S., 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


A. H., 


Dwaarkill, 


New York. 


A. H., 


Bloomfield, 


Davis. 


M. E., 


Eldora, 


Hardin. 


& D. S., 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


A. H., 


Garden Grove, 


Decatur. 


& D. S., 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


Hort., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


A. H., 


Monticello, 


Jones. 


A. H., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


A. H., 


Madrid, 


Boone. 


A. H., 


Rensseler, 


Indiana. 


Sc, 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


E. E., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Sc, 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Agron., 


Newburg, 


Jasper. 


Agron., 


Wyoming, 


Jones. 


D. S., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


A. H., 


Rensseler, 


Indiana. 


A. H., 


Rensseler, 


Indiana. 


& D. S„ 


Olin, 


Jones. 


Agron., 


Onawa, 


Monona. 


C. E., 


New Hartford, 


Butler. 


& D. S., 


Denver, 


Colorado. 


Agron., 


Churdan, 


Greene. 


A. H., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


A. H., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


A. H., 


Allerton, 


Wayne, 


Sc, 


LaPorte City, 


Black Hawk, 


& D. S., 


Stockton, 


Muscatine. 


A. H., 


Burr Oak, 


Winneshiek. 


A. H., 


Freeport, 


Illinois. 


& D. S., 


Anita, 


Cass. 


A. H., 


Tucuman, 


Argentine R< 


A. H., 


Cresco, 


Howard. 


A. H., 


Audubon, 


Audubon. 


M. E., 


Irwin, 


Shelby. 


A. H., 


Hayneld, 


Hancock. 


C. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



383 



Shoemaker, B. B., 


A. H. 


Inwood, 


Lyon. 


Simpson, H. H., 


A. H. 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Smith, Laura, G. 


&D. S. 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie 


Smith, Leah M., 


Sc. 


Fairmont, 


Nebraska. 


Smith, W. H., 


A. H. 


Prattville, 


Alabama. 


Steen, Charles T., 


Agron. 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Stockdale, Guy, 


A. H. 


Walcott, 


Scott. 


Stough, F. G., 


M. E. 


Ida Grove, 


Ida. 


Terrill, Eunice, G. 


&D. S. 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Terrill, Otis, 


Agron. 


Grand Junction, 


Greene. 


Thompson, Brwin, 


A. H, 


Jamacia, 


Guthrie. 


Thompson, Theo., 


A. H. 


Grand Forks, 


No. Dakota. 


Tidrick, A. W., 


A. H. 


Mt. Ayr, 


Ringgold. 


Trotter, Tina, 


D. S. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Vangilst, Cornelius, 


M. E., 


Kilduff, 


Jasper. 


Vorse, Florence, G. 


& D. S., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Wallis, W. B., 


Agron. 


Dubuque, 


Dubuque. 


Watson, R. D., 


Agron. 


Milwaukee, 


Wisconsin. 


Watt, H. F., 


Sc. 


Hawarden, 


Sioux. 


Welton, A. J., 


C. E. 


Sheldahl, 


Polk. 


Westhrook, F., 


M. E. 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


White, J. F., 


Agron. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Wilcox, Lulu, 


D. S. 


Emmetsburg, 


Palo Alto. 


Wilson, C. S., 


A. H. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wilson, Maude, 


D. S. 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Wilson, R. T., 


A. H. 


Seymour, 


Wayne. 


Wolf, Henry, 


Hort. 


Aurora, 


Buchanan. 


Yoder, L. C, 


M. E. 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Zurcher, H. G., 


Agron. 


Farmersburg, 


Clayton. 



SPECIAL DAIRY. 



NAME. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Bortner, A. P., 


West Union, 


Fayette. 


Budden, Nick, 


Petersburg, 


Delaware. 


Holcomb, Harry, 


Cushing, 


Woodbury. 


Knott, Jno., 


St. Joseph, 


Iowa. 


Larson, Alfred, 


St. Ansgar, 


Mitchel. 


Mason, A. G., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Mason, A. J., 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Mason, Freeman, 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Quist, Severin, 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Rockwell, Chas., 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Wiike, Ed., 


Rosendale, 


Iowa. 


Wise, Elmer, 


Storm Lake, 


Buena Vista 



384 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



MUSIC STUDENTS. 



NAME. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Allen, Frances, 


Roland, 


Story. 


Austin, Jessie, M., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bechtle, Jennie, 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


Brandt, Ora, 


Jewell, 


Hamilton. 


Campbell, Maud, 


Newton, 


Jasper. 


Carstenson, A. N., 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Cave, Frank E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chambers, Jno. A., 


Corwith, 


Hancock. 


Chenoweth, Grace, 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Clausen, C. C, 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Clossen, Harold, 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Cutler, W. McL., 


Dubuque, 


Dubuque. 


Davenport, Lora, 


Odebolt, 


Sac. 


Eldridge, Madge, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hanson, H. B., 


Stacyville, 


Mitchell. 


Harrington, Ada, 


Hartsel, 


Colorado. 


Hodgdon, Mary, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Huxsol, Amelia, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Johnson, C, 


Ames, 


Scory. 


Johnson, Hazel. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kelsey, L. E., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Lau, Oscar, 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Lindmeier, H. M., 


Lyons, 


Clinton. 


Lyons, Robert, 


Center Junction 


, Jones. 


McCloud, Blanche, 


Ames, 


Story. 


McCormick, Stella, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Mereness, Gertrude, 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Myers, Ruth, 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Neely, J. B., 


Glenwood, 


Mills. 


Prill, Margaret, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Rice, Dora, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Rueda, Grace Rood, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Schelm, Mattie, 


Charter Oak, 


Crawford. 


Schriner, Cophine, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Schriner, Herbert, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Scott, Ada, 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Storms, Lillian, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Van Epps, Kathryn, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Walsten, Luverna, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Wark, R. S., 


Adair, 


Adair. 


Warren, Fannie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Westphal, Jennie, 


Camanche, 


Clinton. 


Wilson, W. M., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



385 



ENROLLMENT FOR SHORT COURSE IN DOMESTIC SCIENCE. 



NAME. 


TOWN. 


COUNTY. 


Bliss, Edith C., 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Carr, Bessie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Carr, C. Lillian, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Chandler, Letty, 


Kellerton, 


Ringgold. 


Cox, Mrs. A. B., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Drennen, Lena, 


Osceola, 


Clarke. 


Felter, Inez D., 


Washta, 


Cherokee. 


Felter, Mrs. Victor, 


Washta, 


Cherokee. 


Fullerton, Grace, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gossard, Blanche, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gray, Ethel, 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Gugger, Emma, 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Hawley, Mrs. A. W., 


Pioneer, 


Humboldt. 


Housken, Inga, 


Duncombe, 


Webster. 


Huxsol, Emma , 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Jarvis, Mrs. Arthur, 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Lynch, Mrs. L. J., 


Villisca, 


Montgomery. 


Malmin, Bertha, 


McCallsburg, 


Story. 


Mellor, Marie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Plambeck, Theo. C, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Richards, Lydia, 


Clarion, 


Wright. 


Smith, Leah, 


Fairmont, 


Nebraska. 


Sowers, Dollie, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Trotter, Phoebe, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Warburton, Carrie, 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


White, Mrs. G. C, 


Nevada, 


Story. 



ENROLLMENT FOR SPECIAL COURSES IN STOCK AND 
GRAIN JUDGING, JANUARY, 1905. 



NAME. 

Adams, R. K., 
Adamson, Arthur W., 
Adamson, O. O., 
Albaugh, Louis, 
Alleman, G. G., 
Aldrich, H. D., 
Allen, B. F., 
Allen, N., 
Allen, W. P., 
Allison, J. P., 
Allenson, W. R., 
Allyn, E. K., 
Anderson, A. H., 
Anderson, A. L., 
Anderson, T., 
Anderson, W. E., 



TOWN. 

Solon, 

Clinton, 

Bayard, 

Lisbon, 

Slater, 

Waukee, 

Laurens, 

Dows, 

Eagle Grove, 

State Center, 

Hampton, 

Mt. Ayr, 

Sheldahl, 

Ames, 

Harper's Ferry, 

Hawthorne, 



COUNTY. 

Johnson. 

Clinton. 

Guthrie. 

Linn. 

Story. 

Dallas. 

Pocahontas. 

Wright. 

Wright. 

Marshall. 

i?ranklin. 

Ringgold. 

Polk. 

Story. 

Allamakee. 

Montgomery. 



25 



386 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Andrews, B. C, 


Oilie, 


Keokuk. 


Andrews, E. C, 


Vermilion, 


Clay. 


Andrews, L., 


Nora Springs, 


Floyd. 


Archer, B. W., 


Gaynor City, 


Missouri. 


Arnold, E. J., 


Klemme, 


Hancock. 


Armstrong, E. W., 


Searsboro, 


Poweshiek. 


Artis, G. H., 


Grand Mound, 


Clinton. 


Ashby, W., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Atkinson, J. F., 


Washington, 


Washington. 


Bachens, C. R., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Baldwin, E. W., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Ballain, I. E., 


Emerson, 


Mills. 


Barber, T. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Barlou, W. L., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo 


Barringer, R., 


Ruthven, 


Palo Alto. 


Bartlett, F., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Barton, F., 


.uuverne, 


Humboldt. 


Bateman, R., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bates, C, 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Bates, H., 


Cambridge, 


Story. 


Beach, A. A., 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Beall, S. A., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Beck, A., 


Auburn, 


Sac. 


Beck, R. H., 


Langdon, 


Clay. 


Behrens, 0. C, 


Volga, 


Clayton. 


Bennett, E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bennett, G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bennett, R. F., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Berry, D. L,, 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Bickford, L., 


v/ebster City, 


Hamilton. 


Bigelow, R. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Bisberry, B. L., 


Clermont, 


Fayette. 


Black, F. C, 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Bliss, F. C., 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Bliss, J. A., 


Diagonal, 


Ringgold. 


Bloomer, H. H., 


Luverne, 


Kossuth. 


Bohle, F., 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Bohle, Wm., 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Bohrofen, H., 


Grimes, 


Polk. 


Bone, F. S., 


Grand River, 


Decatur. 


Boody, A. C, 


Belle Plaine, 


Benton. 


Born, A. L., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Borthwick, J. L., 


Coin, 


Page. 


Bothwell, A. C, 


Orion, 


Illinois. 


Bouska, J. A., 


Protivin, 


Howard. 


Bacon, W. C, 


New York, 


New York. 


Boys, W. S., 


Creston, 


Union. 


Brandenbury, A. E., 


Ames, 


Story 


Branson, R., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Braun, D. A., 


Corning, 


Adams. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



387 



Brich, P. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Brick, C. A., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Brindle, J. P., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Brinton, R., 


Brighton, 


Washington. 


Brisbine, A. C, 


Downey, 


Cedar. 


Brockway, A. H., 


Grundy Center, 


Tama. 


Brockway, J. M., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Brooks, F. H., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Brownlie, R. A., 


Fairfax, 


Benton. 


Brooks, C. V., 


Hillsdale, 


Mills. 


Brown, H. E., 


Salix, 


Woodbury. 


Brown, L. D., 


.denson, 


Black Hawk. 


Brunner, W., 


Rolfe, 


Pocahontas. 


Burns, Clifford, 


Orion, 


Jllinois. 


Burroughs, S. J., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Burch, J. B., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Burton, F. W., 


Grant, 


Montgomery. 


Byam, Perry, 


Sioux Rapids, 


Buena Vista. 


Cabrera, B. B., Buenas Ayres, Argentine Republic, So. Amen 


Cadwell, H. C, 


Logan, 


Harrison. 


Cain, E. B., 


Delmar, 


Clinton. 


Caldow, J. B., 


Castalia, 


Winneshiek. 


Callahan, P. J., 


Welton, 


Clinton. 


Campbell, G. E., 


Gravity, 


Taylor. 


Cannon, F. I., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Carpenter, A. E., 


Conesville, 


Muscatine. 


Carr, R. E., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Carrothers, T. H., i 


Ryan, 


Delaware. 


Cawley, C. E., 


Manchester, 


Delaware. 


Chandler, C. W., 


Kellerton, 


Ringgold. 


Chandler, H. W., 


Kellerton, 


Ringgold. 


Chapman, Grant, 


Bagley, 


^uthrie. 


Chapman, J. 0., 


Washta, 


Cherokee. 


Childs, C. W., 


Greenfield, 


Adair. 


Chizem, J. B., 


Chicago, 


Illinois. 


Christenson, H. W. f 


Lynn Grove, 


Clay. 


Christenson, L. W., 


Arthur, 


Ida. 


Christenson, H. H., 


Calamus, 


Clinton. 


Christensen, M., 


Marne, 


Cass. 


Christian, 0. H., 


Rolland, 


Story. 


Clampit, R. R., 


New Providence 


, Hardin. 


Clifton, J. E., 


Havelock, 


Pocahontas. 


Coie, R. T., 


Tingley, 


Ringgold. 


Cold, F. T., 


Gladbrook, 


Tama. 


Connell, H. H., 


Deep River, 


Poweshiek. 


Cook, C. C, 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Coon, W. P., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Cooper, C. W., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Cottington, 0., 


Curlew, 


Palo Alto. 


Coverdale, 0. F., 


Delmar, 


Clinton. 



388 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Cox, L. W., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Crane, R. W., 


Kelley, 


Story. 


Creath, C. W., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Creswell, J. C, 


Wapello, 


Louisa. 


Crow, F./ 


Oxford, 


Johnson. 


Crumley, W. R., 


Carlisle, 


Warren. 


Cunningham, D. A., 


Granger, 


Polk. 


Cunningham, S. D., 


Granger, 


Polk. 


Dahlby, P. A., 


Joyce, 


Worth. 


Damewood, B. G., 


Coin, 


Page. 


Daniels, M., 


Pulaski, 


Davis. 


Danskin, T. C, 


Colo, 


Story. 


Davis, A. H., 


Estherville , 


Emmett. 


Davis, F., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dawson, W. L., 


Gaynor City, 


Missouri. 


Dean, H. G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Defenlaugh, B., 


Redding, 


Ringgold. 


Deming, W. A., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Dew, W., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Dewey, H. E., 


Milford, 


Dickinson. 


Dixon, L. G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dodd, C. C, 


Randolph, 


Fremont. 


Dodd, H. V., 


Randolph, 


Fremont. 


Dooley, H. , 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Dosland, M. H., 


Grand Mound, 


Clinton. 


Dove, W. V., 


Janesville, 


Bremer. 


Doyle, T. C, 


Logan, 


Harrison, 


Drahein, E. A., 


Emerson, 


Mills. 


Drake, A. G., 


Manilla, 


Crawford. 


Duerst, H., 


Goldfleld, 


Wright. 


Duke, H. C, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Dutton, F. D., 


Mount Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Eckstein, F. A., 


Chester, 


Howard. 


Ehmann, F. G., 


Boone, 


Boone. 


Elliott, G. G., 


Hartley, 


O'Brien. 


Escher, H. A., 


Harlan, 


Shelby. 


Evans, G. W., 


Hedrick, 


Mahaska. 


Evanson, H. E., 


Rolland, 


Story. 


Folk, D. L., 


Red Oak, 


Montgomery. 


Faidley, I. D., 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Fairley, W., 


Mechanicsville, 


Cedar. 


Fantz, M. M., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Felter, V., 


\v ashta, 


Cherokee. 


Ferguson, E. C, 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Fischer, E. A., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Foster, 0. L., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Frame, J. C, 


Salem, 


Henry. 


France, C. W., 


Rose Hill, 


Mahaska. 


Franks, R. W., 


Renwick, 


Humboldt. 


Freed, S. P., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



389 



Frye, G. D., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gammon, W. G., 


St. Charles, 


Madison. 


Gammon, B. 0., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Geer, G. S., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Gilmore, R., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gleason, G. S., 


Mechanicsville, 


Cedar. 


Glenny, E. B., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Goodman, 0., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Gordon, G. G., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Gormley, N., 


Bondurant, 


Polk. 


Gould, F. R., 


Gilman, 


Marshall. 


Gowdy, A., 


Dexter, 


Dallas. 


Graham, E. H., 


Mt. Carroll, 


Illinois. 


Gray, A., 


Eddyville, 


Wapello. 


Gray, J. F., 


Genoa, 


Illinois. 


Greenwood, R. D., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Gresham, M., 


Petterson, 


Madison. 


<Jrice, T., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Grimes, E., 


Massena, 


Cass., 


Gronan, L. F., 


Kiron, 


Crawford. 


Gross, W. R., 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie. 


Grossmann, E. C, 


Logan, 


Harrison. 


Grubb, M., 


Carbondale, 


Colorado. 


Guernsey, S. C, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Gunn, R. M., 


Buckingham, 




Haafke, J. A., 


Bronson, 


Woodbury. 


Habicht, 0. C, 


Avoca, 


Pottawattamie. 


Paddock, G. W., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Hales, J. N., 


Keosauqua, 


Van Buren. 


Hansen, H. M., 


Algona, 


Kossuth. 


Hansen, Henry, 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Hanson, L., 


Dean, 


Appanoose. 


Hanson, N. P., 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Hanson, W., 


Inwood, 


Lyon. 


Hardman, B., 


Brayton, 


Audubon. 


Harriman, C. B., 


Hampton, 


Franklin. 


Harris, 


Hubbard, 


Hardin. 


Harrison, J. B., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Harrison, H., 


Washta, 


Cherokee.' 


Harrison, L. C, 


Washta, 


Cherokee. 


Harshlarger, W. A., 


Mount Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Harvey, A. J., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Harvey, C, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hatch, F. B., 


Sumner, 


Bremer. 


Haulman, H. E., 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Hawkins, W., 


Farley, 


Dubuque. 


Hawley, A. W., 


Pioneer, 


Humboldt. 


Hayne, D. D., 


Marshalltown, 


Marshall. 


Heald, W. E., 


Downey, 


Cedar. 


Helgeran, T., 


Radcliffe, 


Hardin. 



S90 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Helms, J. D., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Henderson, E. M., 


Randall, 


Hamilton. 


Henderson, E. C, 


Coin, 


Page. 


Henderson, M. 0., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Henning, C. A., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Henry, H. C, 


Carlisle, 


Polk. 


Henryson, T. X., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Herr, H., 


Wilton, 


Cedar. 


Herring, C. L., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Hill, H. H., 


New Sharon, 


Mahaska. 


Hill, H. I., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hodnefield, I., 


Radcliffe, 


Hardin. 


Hofacre, F. F., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Holden, 0. 0., 


Bode, 


Humboldt. 


Hollenbeck, M. E., 


Logan, 


Harrison. 


Holzfaster, W. J., 


Neola, 


Pottawattamie. 


Hook, W. A., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hooper, J. J., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hoover, E., 


Mount Vernon, 


Linn. 


Hopkins, R. F., 


Colo, 


Story. 


Houghtaling, W. W., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Howard, E. B., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hughes, J. R., 


Mount Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Hunt, J. M., 


Ackley, 


Hardin. 


Hunt, W. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Hunter, C. R., 


Iowa City, 


Johnson. 


Hursh, E., 


Marengo, 


Iowa. 


Hutchison, B., 


Anderson, 


Fremont. 


Hutchison, F. H., 


Anderson, 


Fremont. 


Hutchison, T. W., 


Anderson, 


Fremont. 


Iddings, A. H., 


Mapleton, 


Monona. 


Igo, E. B., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Igo, R., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Ineck, E. W., " 


Ames, 


Story. 


Irvine, C, 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Isom, W. C, 


Whiting, 


Monona. 


Jarvis, A., 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Jay, A., 


Blakesburg, 


Wapello. 


Jensen, C. F., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Jensen, J. E., 


Sac City, 


Sac. 


Johnson, C. 0., 


Sheldahl, 


Polk. 


Johnston, R. R., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Johnston, Wi. W., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Jones, R. D., 


GiiDert, 


Story. 


Jones, P., 


Ft. Madison, 


Lee. 


Joyce, H., 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Justice, F., 


Berwick, 


Polk. 


Kasten, J. H., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Keen, C. F., 


West Liberty, 


Muscatine. 


Keenan, F., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



391 



Kelly, H. L., 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Kelsey, C. J., 


Iowa Falls, 


Hardin. 


Kim, C. T., 


LeGrande, 


Marshall. 


Kemp, W., 


Davenport, 


Scott. 


Kemp, W. J., 


Marion, 


Linn. 


Kennison, F. R., 


Madrid, 


Boone. 


Kerr, B. S., 


Dysart, 


Benton. 


King, J. A., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Kingsbury, A. G., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Kinker, H. H., 


Rippey, 


Greene. 


Kinne, G., 


Curlew, 


Palo Alto. 


Kleniewska, Boza, 


Russian Poland, 


Europe. 


Knaack, V. P., 


Correctionville, 


Woodbury. 


Knight, H. R., 


Coin, 


Page. 


Knudsen, F, N., 


Kanawha, 


Hancock. 


Knutson, F. G., 


Hubbard, 


Hardin. 


Koe, C. C, 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Koford, Hans, 


Alexander, 


Franklin. 


ivooker, D. A., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Kuhn, J. M., 


Nevada, 


Story. 


Kurtz, C, 


Oakville, 


Louisa. 


Kurtz, 0. S., 


Wesley, 


Kossuth. 


Lacock, J., 


Mount Vernon, 


Linn. 


LaGrange, J., 


Marengo, 


Iowa. 


Laison, J. L., 


Marcus, 


Cherokee. 


Larsen, 0. L., 


Huxley, 


Story. 


Larsen, P. N., 


Spencer, 


Clay. 


Larson, T. M., 


Randolph, 


Hamilton. 


Larson, A., 


Britt, 


Hancock. 


Larson, L. G., 


Eagle Grove, 


Wright. 


Laughlin, M., 


Batavia, 


Jefferson. 


Laughlin, P. R., 


Batavia, 


Jefferson. 


Lawler, F. J., 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Lawrence, C. W., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Learn, R. T., 


Clermont, 


Fayette. 


Lee, H. D., 


Hartwick, 


Poweshiek. 


Lepley, E., 


Beaman, 


Grundy. 


Lillibridge, C. D., 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Linquist, A., 


Kiron, 


Crawford. 


Lofgren, G. S., 


Dayton, 


Webster. 


Loman, H., 


West Point, 


Lee. 


Love, E. C, 


Orion, 


Illinois. 


Luchsinger, J., 


Luverne, 


Kossuth. 


Ludwig, 0. H., 


Lawson, 


Woodbury. 


Lundstete, E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Lundvall, N. J., 


Boxholm, 


Boone. 


Lwengood, P., 


Castana, 


Monona. 


Lyon, F. D., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Magel, L., 


Sidney, 


Fremont. 


Magel, W. C, 


Sidney, 


Fremont. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Malmin, A. C, 
Manning, A., 
Manning, F. W., 
Marti, P., 
Martin, K. L., 
Mason, C. B., 
Mason, E. J., 
Mason, L. M., 
Mason, T. A., 
Mast, J., 
Matzinger, G., 
Mayor, C, 
Maylan, A. F., 
Mc Arthur, D., 
McArthur, W., 
McKabe, W., 
McClean, C. R., 
McCoffin, H. A., 
McCormick, J. E., 
McCoy, M. J., 
McCrery, Henry, 
McCulloch, M. E., 
McDonald, W. A., 
McGranahan, Harry, 
McGrew, E. W., 
McLean, J. A., 
McSweeney, J. J., 
Mead, I. J., 
Meinecke, F., 
Meints, H., 
Me|berg, V. E., 
Menzel, J. H., 
Merriman, J. E., 
Miller, N., 
Miller, W., 
Mills, J. W., 
Montgomery, F. B., 
Moore, C. R., 
Moorhous, C, 
Morada, C., 
Morris, H. F., 
Morris, J. N., 
Moses, S. W., 
Mowen, G. V., 
Mourer, R., 
Muxen, P., 
Myers, Glenn, 
Nains, J. W„ 
Nash, A. J., 
Neal, B. C, 



McCallsburg, 


Story. 


Kellerton, 


Ringgold. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Lycurgus, 


Allamakee. 


Gaza, 


O'Brien. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Calamus, 


Clinton. 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Slater, 


Polk. 


Eddyville, 


Mahaska. 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Union, 


Hardin. 


Jonesville, 


Bremer. 


Farmington, 


Missouri. 


Waverly, 


Bremer. 


Atlantic, 


Cass. 


Humestone, 


Wayne, 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Springville, 


Linn. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Neola, 


i-ottawattamie. 


Indianola, 


Warren. 


Forest City, 


Winnebago. 


Grand Mound, 


Clinton. 


Kiron, 


Crawford. 


Hazelton, 


Buchanan. 


Albia, 


Monroe. 


Dubuque, 


Dubuque. 


Solon, 


Johnson. 


Estherville, 


Emmett. 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Kellerton, 


Ringgold. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Ireton, 


Sioux. 


Linn Grove, 


Buena Vista. 


Ames, 


Story. 


Maxwell, 


Story. 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Whiting, 


Monona. 


Tiffin, 


Johnson. 


Emerson, 


Mills. 


Nichols, 


Muscatine. 


Mt. Vernon, 


Linn. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



393 



Neal, B. H., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Linn. 


Neal, C. E., 


Mt. Vernon, 


Linn. 


Neil, Marshall, 


Hopkinton, 


Delaware. 


Iselson, A., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Nelson, C. J., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Nelson, Chas., 


Sheldahl, 


Polk. 


Nelson, Nels, 


Irwin, 


Shelby. 


Nelson, M. S., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Nienaber, E. C., 


Durant, 


Cedar. 


Noble, 0. E., 


Glidden, 


Carroll. 


Nordholm, G. W., 


Boxholm, 


Boone. 


Nordstrom, T., 


Aurelia, 


Cherokee. 


Nurth, M., 


LeMars, 


Plymouth. 


O'Connor, F. J., 


Honey Creek, 


Pottawattamie. 


Ogle, J. W., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Oldham, C, 


Eddyville, 


Wapello. 


Olson, A. L., 


Kirkman, 


Shelby, 


Olson, 0., 


Kiron, 


Crawford. 


Orr, J. W., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Palmer, F. A., 


Eddyville, 


Wapello. 


Palmer, J. C., 


Elwood, 


Clinton. 


Parker, L., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Parkinson, John, 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Pascal, D. L., 


DeWitt, 


Clinton. 


Pashby, G. C, 


Cedar Falls, 


Blackhawk. 


Pederson, L., 


Bode, 


Humboldt. 


Pederson, W., 


Marne, 


Cass. 


Peterson, O., 


Ringsted, 


Emmett. 


Perkins, W., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Person, L. C, 


Sibley, 


Osceola. 


Peterson, A., 


Lanyon, 


Webster. 


Peterson, M. C, 


Randall, 


Hamilton. 


Pike, H. P., 


Forest City, 


Hancock. 


Pierce, F. L., 


Clear Lake, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Pittman, J. R., 


Scranton, 


Greene. 


Pitts, G. S., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Plager, L. W., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Porter, C, 


Centerville, 


Appanoose. 


Powell, C, 


Eddyville, 


Wapello. 


Powers, H. 0., 


Moulton, 


Appanoose. 


Powers, J. F., 


Persia, 


Harrison. 


Proctor, R., 


Fairdale, 


Illinois. 


Radeke, Wm., 


Luzerne, 


Benton. 


Ramey, L., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Redfern, F., 


New London, 


Henry. 


Redfern, R., 


Yarmouth, 


Des Moines. 


Reeve, C, 


Geneva, 


Franklin. 


Reichenbach, F. A., 


Luther, 


Boone. 


Reno, M., 


Agency, 


Wapello. 


Renshaw, F., 


Inwood, 


Lyon. 



394 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Rexroth, J. J., 


Walton Junction, 


, Muscatine. 


Rice, I., 


Estherville, 


Emmett. 


Richardson, L., 


Hillsdale, 


Mills. 


Rink, R. R., 


Shelby, 


Harrison. 


Ritchy, U. S., 


Packwood, 


Jefferson. 


Ritland, L. J., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Roberts, C, 


Luther, 


Boone. 


Roberts, C. E., 


Fremont, 


Mahaska. 


Roberts, H. E., 


Postville, 


Allamakee. 


Robinson, H. R., 


State Center, 


Marshall. 


Roe, L. W., 


Oskaloosa, 


Mahaska. 


Rogers, Burton, 


Cedar Rapids, 


Linn. 


Rollins, J. C, 


Prosper, 


Minnesota. 


Ronana, D. D., 


Waukon, 


Allamakee. 


Rosenfeld, C, 


Kelly, 


Story. 


Ross, J. A., 


Garden Grove, 


Decatur. 


Rote, W., 


Charles City, 


Floyd. 


Royer, E. E., 


Dallas Center, 


Dallas. 


Rude, C. H., 


Fonda, 


Pocahontas. 


Ruprecht, A., 


Massillon, 


Cedar. 


Russell, H., 


Bagley, 


Guthrie. 


Safley, H. J., 


Tipton, 


Cedar. 


Satrang, I. I., 


Harper's Ferry, 


Allamakee. 


Savim, L., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Sawhill, J. E., 


Clarinda, 


Page. 


Saylor, F. A., 


Valley Junction, 


Polk. 


Schaal, E. A., 


Polk City, 


Polk. 


Schildroth, G. J., 


Reinbeck, 


Grundy. 


Schlater, H. A., 


Lawler, 


Chickasaw. 


Schmid, W>, 


Beresford, 


South Dakota. 


Schmidt, A., 


Holstein, 


Ida. 


Schoubal, C. L., 


Earlham, 


Madison. 


Schroeder, L. H., 


Holstein, 


Ida. 


Scbuldt, B. R., 


Hayfleld, 


Hancock. 


Sconce, R., 


Benton, 


Ringgold. 


Scott, W. G., 


Perry, 


Dallas. 


Secor, P. R., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Seeley, W. B., 


Mt. Pleasant, 


Henry. 


Severance, P. V., 


Grundy Center, 


Grundy. 


Sexauer, T., 


Ankeny, 


Polk. 


Shank, C. C, 


Waterloo, 


Blackhawk. 


Shaver, E., 


Klona, 


Johnson. 


Shea, R., 


Fonda, 


Pocahontas. 


Sherger, F. A., 


Blairstown, 


Benton. 


Shirley, W. S., 


Minburn, 


Dallas. 


Scheeler, L. L., 


Pierson, 


Plymouth. 


Sparke, C, 


Ellsworth, 


Hamilton. 


Skromme, L. J., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Smith, L. D., 


Elkader, 


Clayton. 


Smith, R., 


Ames, 


Story. 



STUDENTS OF THE COLLEGE 



395 



Southwisk, L., 


Riverside, 


Washington. 


Spartz, G., 


Ashton, 


Osceola. 


Spinney, B. A., 


Massena, 


Cass. 


Spurgin, J., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Stearns, P., 


Webster City, 


Webster. 


Stearns, vsf., 


Webster City, 


Hamilton. 


Stevens, S., 


Colo, 


Story. 


Stevenson, W. S., 


Indianola, 


Warren, 


Stone, 0., 


Springville, 


Linn. 


Stroppel, T., 


West Branch, 


Cedar. 


Strout, G., 


Keosauqua, 


Van Buren, 


Sundberg, J., 


Whiting, 


Monona. 


Suss, L. J., 


Fallow, 


Palo Alto. 


Sweney, J. S., 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Taff, P. C, 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Taylor, R. J., 


Bronson, 


Woodbury. 


Tevedt, J. 0., 


Roland, 


Story. 


Thompson, T., 


Sciola, 


Montgomery. 


Thompson, S. C, 


Mason City, 


Cerro Gordo. 


Thompson, T. H., 


LeGrande, 


Marshall. 


Thornton, R., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Thornton, C. E., 


New Providence, 


Hardin. 


Tierman, P. J., 


Patterson, 


Madison. 


Tjornagel, M. 0., 


Story City, 


Story. 


Tostenson, 0., 


LeGrand, 


Marshall. 


Townsend, J., 


Ashton, 


Osceola. 


Treeman, A. J., 


Ames, 


Story. 


Tripp, C. H., 


Ontario, 


Story. 


Tripp, W. P., 


Kent, 


Adams. 


Trowbridge, S. F., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Tucker, W. W., 


Knoxville, 


Marion. 


Tunnicliff, J. C, 


Shenandoah, 


Page. 


Turner, A., 


Maxwell, 


Polk. 


Ukro, F., 


Ackley, 


Grundy. 


Vannorsdel, D. V., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Van Meter, W. L., 


Adel, 


Dallas. 


Van Orsdel, R. M., 


Kingsley, 


Plymouth. 


Vansant, J. B., 


Farragut, 


Fremont. 


Voncent, H. W., 


Letts, 


Louisa. 


Votaw, W., 


Fremont, 


Mahaska. 


Wall, 0., 


Panora, 


Guthrie. 


Wallace, H. A., 


Des Moines, 


Polk. 


Waller, H. B., 


Pioneer, 


Humboldt. 


Warburton, W. H., 


Independence, 


Buchanan. 


Warden, H. E., 


Melbourne, 


Marshall. 


Warner, F., 


Goldfield, 


Wright. 


Watt, A., 


Anamosa, 


Jones. 


Wenstrand, P., 


Essex, 


Page. 


West, Roy, 


Bondurant, 


Polk. 


Westfall, G. W., 


Toledo, 


Tama. 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



Whitaker, J., 
Wickham, C. M., 
Wilcox, L. S., 
Wiles, F. W., 
Will, Carl, 
Williams, J. A., 
Wilson, A., 
Wilson, A. H., 
Wilson, S. W., 
Wingert, P. E., 
Wingert, R. D., 
Winslow, T. H., 
Winslow, W. J., 
Wittman, E. C, 
Wooley, B., 
Wormley, D. F., 
Wright, R. S., 
Wylie, J. L. f 
Young, O. N., 
Zaelke, C. L., 
Zimmerman, A. T., 
Zumwalt, L. M., 



Sioux City, 

Mt. Vernon, 

Harlan, 

Yorktown, 

Dayton, 

Clear Lake, 

West Liberty, 

Colo, 

Dayton, 

Tipton, 

Tipton, 

Clemmons, 

Clemmons, 

Pioneer, 

Garden Grove, 

Newton, 

Mount Pleasant, 

Gilmore, 

Ringsted, 

Elliott, 

Washta, 

Ames, 



Woodbury. 

Linn. 

Shelby. 

Page. 

Webster. 

Cerro Gordo. 

Muscatine. 

Story. 

Webster. 

Cedar. 

Cedar. 

Marshall. 

Marshall. 

Humboldt. 

Decatur. 

Jasper. 

Henry. 

Marshall. 

Emmett. 

Montgomery. 

Cherokee. 

Story. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 



398 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

ALUMNI OF THE STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND 
MECHANIC ARTS. 

* before a name indicates deceased. 

* after the address indicates an old address. Late informa- 
tion lacking. 

GRADUATES OF 1872. 

J. C. Arthur, B. S., M. S., Lafayette, Indiana. 

P. S. Brown, B. S., Chico, California. 

O. H. Cessna, B. S., A. M., D. D., Station, A., Ames, Iowa. 

*S. A. Churchill, B. S. 

*S. H. Dickey, B. S. 

Chas. N. Dietz, B. S., Omaha, Nebraska. 

Luther Foster, B. S., M. S. A., Las Cruces, New Mexico. 

*H. Fuller, B. S., 

*F. L. Harvey, B. S., M. S. 

*E. M. Hungerford, B. S. 

Mattie (Locke) Macomber, B. S., 3020 Kingman Ave., 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. K. Macomber, B; Sc, 510 Youngerman Block, Des Moines, Iowa. 
L. W. Noyes, B. S., 234 Lincoln Park Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois. 
H. L. Page, B. S., Leeds Station, Iowa. 

G. W. Ramsey, B. S., Masonville, Iowa. 

*Fannie (Richards) Stanley, B. S. 
*C. A. Smith, B. S. 
*I. W. Smith, B. S. 
*H. C. Spencer, B. S. 

E. W. Stanton, B. S., M. S., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

J. L. Stevens, B. S., 728 Linn St., Boone, Iowa. 
C. L. Suksdorf, B. S., 1910 Marquette Street, Davenport, Iowa. 
*T. L. Thompson, B. S. 

C. H. Tillotson, B. S., Ormund, Nebraska. 
*C. P. Wellman, B. S. 

John M. Wells, B. S., Nevada, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1873. 

Edward L. Beard, B. S., R. F. D., 5, Decorah, Iowa. 

Rowena (Edson) Stevens, B. S., 728 Linn Street, Boone, Iowa. 

*G. R. Flower, B. S., 

W. Green, B. S., Hort. Dept, Capitol Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 

*G. W. Harvey, B. S., 

A. M. Hawkins, B. S., 661 Yesler Way, Seattle, Washington. 

D. A. Kent, B. S., R. F. D. No. 3, Jewell, Iowa. 
Kate (Krater) Starr, B. S., Algona, Iowa. 
*J. S. Lee, B. S. 

Chas. B. Maben, B. S., - Wealthwood, Minnesota. 

M. F. Marshall, B. S., Atwood, Kansas.* 



LIST OF GRADUATES 399 

Hattie (Raybourne) Morse, B. S., 1617 Humboldt St., Denver, Col. 
W. O. Robinson, B. S., 219 East Eighth St., Oklahoma, Oklahoma. 
M. Stalker, B. S., V. S., M. S., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 
Sallie (Stalker) Smith, B. S., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1874. 

Estella (Bebout) Morse, B. S., Main St., Sevastapol, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
C. D. Boardman, B. S., Okeene, Oklahoma. 

Chas. S. Chase, B. S., 517 Franklin Sreet, Waterloo, Iowa. 
Chas. E. Clingan, B. S>, 814 Sixth Street, Sioux City, Iowa. 
E. R. Clingan, B. S., Belt, Montana. 

*C. P. Hastings, B. S. 

George W. Kiesel, B. S., 57 Highland Place, Dubuque, Iowa. 
M. C. Litteer, B. S., Yukon, Oklahoma. 

G. E. Marsh, B. S., Osage, Iowa. 

O. P. McCray, B. S., 620 Fourth Street, Sioux City, Iowa.* 
Mary (Palmer) Snell, B. S., 711 Crawford Street, Boone, Iowa. 
A. A. Parsons, B. S., 326 Nevada Ave., Colorado Springs, Colorado. 
Eva (Paull) Vanslyke, B. S., 1406 Tenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa.* 
E. A. Pyne, B. S., Waverly, Iowa. 

Ida (Smith) Noyes, B. S., 234 Lincoln Park Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
W. R. Smith, B. S., 1629 North Seventieth Ave., Chicago, Illinois.* 
Kate (Tupper) Galpin, B. S., 520 N. Ave., 64 Los Angeles, Calif. 
J. R. Whitaker, B. S., 703 Carroll Street, Boone, Iowa. 
*S. Y. Yates, B. S. 

GRADUATES OF 1875. 

E. P. Cadwell, B. S., Manila, P. I.* 

Millah (Cherrie) Whiting, B. S., 636 Thirtieh Ave., Denver, Colo. 

Alice (Cunningham) Culver, B. S., Knoxville, Iowa.* 

Lizzie (Curtis) Foster, B. S., Masilla Park, Las Cruces, N. M.* 

R. P. Kelley, B. S., Helena, Montana.* 

C. H. Lee, B. S., 411 McPhee Block, Denver, Colorado.* 

W. R. Lamoreaux, B. S., l.os Angeles, California.* 

Hannah (Lyman) Cadwell, B. S., Helena, Montana.* 

Frank J. Macomber, B. S., Lewis, Iowa. 

Celestia (Neal) Gearhart, B. S., 359 Grand Ave., Astoria, Oregon. 

T. L. Palmer, B. S., 614 Kirby Street, Lake Charles, Louisiana. 

H. R. Patrick, B. S., Phoenix, Arizona. 

C. E. Peterson, B. S., Panora, Iowa. 

*Ida (Ross) Boardman, B. S. 

M. E. Rudolph, B. S., Canton, So. Dakota. 

Ida (Sherman) Caulkins, B. S., Storm Lake, Iowa. 

L. C. Thornton, B. S., Pocahontas, Iowa.* 

Nancy (Wills) Roundy, B. S., Hawarden, Iowa.* 

Lizzie (Wilson) Edwards, B. S., Waterloo, Iowa.* 

J. M. Whitaker, B. S., 12 East Main Street, Marshalltown, Iowa. 



400 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

GEADUATES OF 1876. 

Martin I. Aitken, B. S., 1812 F. Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Arthur P. Barker, B. S., 318 Eighth Street, Clinton, Iowa. 
L. W. Beard, B. S., Decorah, Iowa.* 

A. M. Blodgett, B. S., 405 Thayer Building, Kansas City, Missouri. 
Julia (Blodgett) Hainer, B. S., Aurora, Nebraska. 

*L. A. Claussen, B. S. 

J. E. Cobbey, B. S., 1505 South Third Street, Beatrice, Nebraska. 
W. S. Collins, B. S., Basin, Wyoming.* 

Winifred (Dudley) Shaw, B. S., 1700 4th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. J. Pegtley, B. S., 211 South Main Street, Wichita, Kansas. 
William T. Gilmore, B. S., 620 Fifth Street, Tipton, Iowa. 
James F. Hardin, B. S., Eldora, Iowa. 

Ella (Harlow) McKinzie, B. S., Cor. Elm and Twenty-third Street, 

Spokane, Washington. 
A. E. Hitchcock, B. S., Mitchell, So. Dakota. 

W. M. James, B. S., Meridan, Yucutan.* 

Ella (Mead) Dissmore, B. S., Dissmore, No. Dakota. 

G. A. Gerard, B. S., Denver, Colorado.* 

H. N. Scott, B. S., 489 Jefferson Street, Portland, Oregon. 
A. B. Shaw, B. S., 1700 Fourth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
L. E. Spencer, B. S., 5725 Monroe Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
W. W. Woodward, B. S., Lincoln, Nebraska.* 

GRADUATES OF 1877. 

F. W. Booth, B. S., 7342 Rural Lane, Mt. Airy, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Alfa (Campbell) Fassett, B. S., 118 South Scoville Ave, 

Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois. 
Mary (Carpenter) Hardin, B. S., 
C. C. Colclo, B. S., 
Kate (Curtis) Mirick, B. S., 
J. W. Doxsee, B. S., 
Mary (Farwell) Carpenter, B. S., 
A. P. Hargrave, B. S., 
W. A. Helsell, B. S., 
J. B. Hungerford, B. S., 
W. N. Hunt, B. S., 
*R. F. Jordan, B. S. 
*Cora B. (Keith) Pierce, B. S. 
Edwin L. King, B. S., 
George I. Miller, B. S., 427 Story Street, Boone, Iowa. 
Alice (Neal) Gregg, B. S., Traer, Iowa. 

J. C. Milnes, B. S., 3546 Forest Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Cora (Patty) Payne, B. S., Linden, Iowa. 

L. B. Robinson, B. S., 1010 Baldwin Street, Harlan, Iowa. 
T. L. Smith, B. S., 134 Tenth Street, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
F. L. Stratton, B. S., Osceola, So. Dakota.* 

*H. M. White, B S. 



Eldora, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Monticello, 


Iowa. 


Armstrong, 


Iowa. 


Odebolt, 


Iowa. 


Carroll, 


Iowa. 


Central City, 


Iowa.* 


Osceola, 


Nebraska. 



Garey, 


California. 


Santa Maria, 


California. 


Logan, 


Iowa. 


Rockwell, 


Iowa.* 


Prairieburg, 


Iowa.* 


Pueblo, 


Colorado. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 401 

GRADUATES OF 1878. 

♦Florence (Brown) Martin, B. S. 

Richard Burke, B. S., 221-223 First Ave., East, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

H. L. Glenn, B. S., 924 Eleventh Avenue, Helena, Montana. 

A. E. Griffith, B. S., M. S., 703 Madison Ave., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

J. C. Hainer, B. S., M. S., 309 Security Bidg., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Milan M. Hitchcock, B. C. E., 412 Pullman Bidg., Chicago, Illinois. 

Thomas F. Lee, B. S., Box 98, Lakeport, California. 

C. E. Martin, B. C. E., San Antonio, Texas.* 

J. C. Meridith, B. C. E., Kansas City, Missouri.* 

C. F^ Mount, B. C. E., C. E., Homewood, Penn. 

J. N. Muncey, B. S., Jesup, Iowa. 

Emma (McHenry) Glenn, B. S., 924 Eleventh Ave., Helena Mont. 

David McKinnon, B. S., California, Iowa. 

Ellen (Rice) Robbins, B. S., 290 McGregor St., Manchester, N. H. 

Wm. K. Robbins, B. S., 290 McGregor St., Manchester, N. H. 

L. (Shepherd) Beckwith, B. S., 

Ida (Twitchell) Blockman, B. S., 

E. G. Tyler, B. C. E., 

G. W. Wilson, B. C. E., 

J. W. Whitney, B. S., 

Belle Woods, B. S., 



GRADUATES OF 1879. 



Malinda (Cleaver) Faville, B. S., 428 Pool St., Norfolk, Virginia. 
♦Carrie (Carter) Hanson, B. S. 

Lillie (Croy) Lee, B. S., 118 Oak Park, Chicago, Illinois.* 
Geo. C. Faville, B. S., D. V. M., 428 Pool St., Norfolk, Virginia. 
Frank N. Field, B. C. E., 715 Foster Street, Burlington, Iowa. 
F. H. Friend. B. C. E., 897 Ashland Avenue, St. Paul, Minnesota. 
Albert L. Hanson, B. C. E., Ada, Minnesota. 

T. V. Hogatt, B. S., 808 Bush St., San Francisco, California. 
James E. Hyde, B. S., New Rockford ; No. Dakota. 

L. L. Manwaring, B. S., 303 West Olive St., Stillwater, Minnesota. 
W. G. McConnon, B. M. E., 1024 South Avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Jennie (McElyea) Beyer, B. S., 901 Kellogg Street, Ames, Iowa. 
*J. C. Noble, B. S. 

Herbert Osborne, B. S., M. S., 485 King Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 
Warren M. Scott, B. S., Kiona, Washington. 

James D. Shearer, B. S., 517 First Ave., So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Fremont Turner, B. M. E., 902 Sixteenth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. M. Waugh, B. S., 1525 Monadnock Building, Chicago, Illinois. 
♦Genevieve (Welch) Barstow, B. S. 

Willis Whited, B. M. E., M. E., 286 Main Street, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Alice (Whited) Burling, B. S., Eldora, Iowa. 



26 



402 



IOWA STATE COLLEC4E 



GRADUATES OF 1880. 



M. J. Bailey, B. S., 


Custer City, 


So. Dakota.* 


D. D. Briggs, B. S., 


Nevada, 


Iowa.* 


*F. Boddy, B. S. 






0. S. Brown, B. S., 


Meservey, 


Iowa. 


M. Hakes, B. S., 


Laurens, 


Iowa. 


D. S. Hardin, B. S., 


Alma, 


Nebraska. 


*E. D. Harvey, B. S. 






J. Hassett, B. S., 


Papillion, 


Nebraska.* 


Carrie (Lane Chapman) Catt, B. 


S., Park Row 


Bldg, 



*C. H. McGrew, B. S. 

*R. M. Nicholson, B. S. 

*G. E. Reed, B. S. 

J. L. Simcoke, B. S., 

C. D. Taylor, B. S., 

W. A. Thomas, D. V. M., 645 North 

J. Vincent, D. V. M., 

W. B. Welch, B. S., D. V. M., 



Adel, Iowa.* 

Seattle, Washington.* 

13th Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Shenandoah, Iowa.* 
Marshall, Missouri.* 



GRADUATE S OF 1881. 

W. C. Armstrong, B. C. E., C. E., 225 Central Ave., Wilmette, 111. 

Nellie (Bell) McGavern, B. S., Mo. Valley, Iowa. 

A. M. Beresford, B. S., Orleans, Nebraska. 

Thomas Burke, B. S., Baker City, Oregon. 

Chas. M. Coe, B. S., Cor. 11th and Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 

Frank E. Colby, B. C. E., Onawa, Iowa. 

*Marilla J. Crossman, B. S. 

James S. Dewell, B. S., Mo. Valley, Iowa. 

C. A. Dodge, B. C. E., Orange City, Iowa. 

E. C. Portner, B. S., 801-126 State Street, Chicago, Illinois.* 

F. E. Furry, B. S., Alden, Iowa. 
Mark J. Furry, B. S., Alden, Iowa. 

Julia M. Hanford, B. S., 811 South Eleventh St., Tacoma, Wash. 

*R. J. Hopkins, B. S. 

W. O. McElroy, B. C. E., Newton, Iowa. 

Jno. S. McGavern, B. S., Mo. Valley, Iowa. 

Wm. H. McHenry, B. S., 2820 Cottage Grove Ave., Des Moines, la. 

Jennie (Perrett) Gault, B. S., Whitworth College, Tacoma, Wash. 

Alice (Sayles) Osborn, B. S., 485 King Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 

Thos. W. Shearer, B. S., M. S., Wallisville, Texas. 

GRADUATES OF 1882. 



W. D. Atkinson, B. 
*J. A. Blaine, B. S. 
Etta M. Budd, B. S. 



S., 1605 Forrest Avenue, Parsons, Kansas. 



Kellogg St., Ames, 



Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 403 

Geo. M. Catt, B. C. E., C. E., Park Row Bldg, New York, N. Y. 
Mary (Coe) Lorbeer, B. S., 781 Holt Avenue, Pomona, California. 
W. V. A. Dodds, B. S. 1207 North 7th Street, Beatrice, Nebraska. 
W. M. Dudley, B. S., 300 Church Street, Shenandoah, Iowa. 
*H. J. Gable, B. S. 

C. I. Lorbeer, B. S., 781 West Holt Avenue, Pomona, California. 
J. B. Marsh, B. M. E., 1700 Ninth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
E. A. McDonald, B. S., Box 2165, Mexico - City, Mexico. 
J. R. McKim, B. S., 304 Maple Avenue, Kansas City, Missouri. 
Nellie (Merrill) Wheeler, B. S., 1715 Ninth St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Delia A. Neal, B. S., 16 Augusta Avenue, Atlanta, Georgia. 
J. H. Patten, B. S., Denver, Colorado.* 

Hattie A. Perrett, B. S., Rock Falls, Iowa. 

Lizzie Perrett, B. S., Rock Falls, Iowa. 

O. C. Peterson, B. S., 7405 Princeton Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
♦Kitty E. Reeve, B. S. 

C. F. Saylor, B. S., 1082 Twenty-first Street, Des Moines, Iowa.* 
Sarah (Smith) McDonald, B. S., Box 2165, Mexico City, Mexico. 

D. T. Stockman, B. S., Sigourney, Iowa. 

W. S. Summers, B. S., Omaha, Nebraska. 

W. W. Wheeler, B. S., 1715 Ninth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

W. U. White, B. S., Hope, No. Dakota. 

GBADTJATES OF 1883. 

A. M. Allen, B. S., 2116 Kenwood Boulevard, Minneapolis, Minn.* 
A. G. Andrews, B. C. E., U. S. Surveyor General's Office, 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
G. M. Burnham, B. S., ^.shland, Wisconsin. 

Luberta (Carson) Cleave, B. S., 224 Catherine St., Ottawa, Illinois. 
George Caven, B. C. E., 45-154 Lake Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Jennie L. Christman, B. S., 150 Jay Street, Albany, New York. 
Virginia (Colclo) Quint, B. S., 1715 W. Ninth St., Des Moines, la. 
George W. Curtis, B. S. A., M. S. A., Fort Worth, Texas. 
C. M. Doxsee, B. S., Algona, Iowa.* 

*Lottie Estes, B. S. 

C. H. Flynn, D. V. M., Postville, Iowa. 

*Jessie (Frater) Muncey, B. S. 

H. M. Hunter, B. S., Sibley, Iowa. 

Chas. H. Kegley, B. S. A., 970 Eighteenth Street, Oakland, Calif. 
Minnie (Knapp) Mayo, B. S., 519 Pujo Street, Lake Charles, La. 
Herman Knapp, B. S. A., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

Mary (McDonald) Knapp, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
Kate (McNeil) Wells, B. S., 1801 R. Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Elwood Mead, B. S., C. E., 1513 Rhode Island Avenue, 

Washington, D. C. 
A. M. Miller, B. S„ 1314 E. Thirteenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa.* 
Emily A. Reeve, B. S., 1909 Ninith Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
M. J. Riggs, B. C. E., 3136 Collingwood Avenue, Toledo, Ohio. 
S. C. Scott, B. S., Lyons, Iowa.* 



404 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

*Effie G. Slater, B. S. 

F. J. Smith, B. S., 2311 Carpenter Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 
M, E. "Wells, jtf. S., 1801 R. Street, Lincoln, Nebraska. 

W. D. Wells, B. S., 1716 Park Avenue, Davenport, Iowa. 
Agatha (Wjest) Ramsey, B. S., Rock Rapids, Iowa. 

Mabel A. (Young) Alexander, B. S., Clarion, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1884. 

J. F. Armstrong, B. S., Faulkton, So. Dakota. 

Edna (Bell) Anderson, B. S., Mo. Valley, Iowa. 

T. F. Bevington, B. S., Iowa Building, Sioux City, Iowa.* 

Geo. R. Chatburn, B. C. E., 2850 P. St., Lincoln, Nebraska. 

C. J. Clark, B. C. E., Denver, Colorado.* 

J. E. Daugherty, B. C. E., 1420 W. Seventh St., Texarkana, Texas. 

*W. P. Dickey, B. S. 

L. M. Garrett, B. S., 703 West. Seventh Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

J. W. Gill, B. C. E. 

B. T. Hainer, B. S., 1002 E. Street, Perry, Oklahoma. 
Hermine (Hainer) Gabel, B. S., 446 Hamilton Avenue, 

Palo Alto, California. 
*A. E. (Henry) Quint, B. S., M. Ph. 

G. B. Hibbs, B. S., Mitchellville, Iowa. 

A. S. Hitchcock, B. S. A., M. S., 3363 Sixteenth Street, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
F. A. Huntley, B. S. A., 14 Quince St., North Yakima, Washington. 

F. L. Lambert, B. S. A., R. F. D. No. 3, Charles City, Iowa. 
W. E. D. Morrison, D. V. M., 978 McGarry St., Los Angeles, Calif. 

E. J. Nichols, B. C. E., 407 Juan Linn Avenue, Victoria, Texas. 

G. M. Osborn, D. V. M., 126 A. Avenue, East, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

F. L. Pitman, B. C, E., Port Norfolk, Virginia.* 

J. F. Porter, B. C. E., 205 Market Street, Alton, Illinois. 
Addie (Rice) Hainer, B. S., Webster Groves, St. Louis, Missouri. 

C. H. Sloan, B. S., Geneva, Nebraska. 

G. W. Thompson, B. C. E., Casey, Iowa.* 

C. Vincent, B. S., 1812 Chicago Street, Omaha, Nebraska. 

M. Vincent, B. S. A., Lake Charles, Louisiana, 

lone (Weatherby) Marsh, B. S., 1700 Ninth St., Des Moines, la.* 
*W. J. Hicks, B. S. 

W. H. Wier, B. S., Swan, Iowa. 

Alfred Williams, B. C. E., Treadwell, Alaska. 

Fannie R. Wilson, B. S., Charles City, Iowa. 

G. W. Wormley, B. C. E., Newton, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1885. 

C. S. Bowie, B. M. E., 105 South 10th Street, Tacoma, Washington. 
L. G. Brown, B. C. E., York Bridge Company, York, Pennsylvania. 
Chas. A. Carey, B. S., D. V. M., Auburn, Alabama. 

D. B. Collier, B. S. A., Durant, Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 405 

D. B. Collins, D. V. M., Beatrice, Nebraska.* 

G. H. Glover, B. S., D. V. M., Ft. Collins, Colorado. 

Geo. F. Goodnow, B. S., M. S., 220 Genesee St., Waukegan, Illinois. 
Elam Gray, B. C. E., 1941 Morgan Ave., Morgan Park, Illinois. 
W. A. Grow, B. S., Grantsville, Montana. 

Willet M. Hays, B. S. A., University Farm, 

St. Anthony Park, Minnesota. 
*E. N. Hill, B. M. E. 

D. L. Hutchinson, B. C. E., 2245 Irving Street, Denver, Colorado.* 
Hannah (Hutton) Shearer, B. S., Wallisville, Texas. 

L. D. Jackson, B. M. E. 

Mark E. Johnson, D. V. M., Corning, Iowa. 

G. W. Knorr, B. S. A., Clarks Station,Kentucky. 

*C. J. Lee, B. S. "" 1 

Frank Leverett, B. S., 312 North Thayer St., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

J. C. Lipes, B. S., 815 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, New York. 

J. B. C. Lockwood, B. C. E., 70 Dexter Horton Blvd., Seattle, Wash. 

*Anna (McConnon) Bevington, B. S. 

Albert G. Mosier, B. C. E., Sedro-Woolley, "Washington. 

L. F. McCoy, B. C. E., 1202 Fourth Avenue, Spokane, Washington. 

Anna (Nichols) Goodnow, B. S., 537 Genesee St., Waukegan, 111. 

W. B. Niles, D. V. M., Ames, Iowa. 

*Oak G. Norton, B. S. A. 

J. G. Pope, B. M. E., 857 Nineteenth St., Oakland, California. 

Emma (Porter) Sloan, B. S., Geneva, Nebraska. 

A. U. Quint, B. S., 1715 West Ninth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

E. E. Sayres, D. V. M., Algona, Iowa. 

F. S. Schoenleber, B. S. A., M. S. A., 1639 Wabash Ave., 

Chicago, 111. 
I. B. Schreckengast, B. S., Washington, Iowa. 

Lydia (Schreckengast) Collier, B. S., Durant, Iowa. 
S. Stewart, D. V. M., Kansas City, Kansas.* 

C. E. Underhill, B. S., Onawa, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1886. 

J. W. Bradford, B. C. E., 10255, Elizabeth Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

B. Buchli, B. S., D. V. M., Alma, Kansas. 

P. S. Burns, B. S., Mass. Institute Technology, Boston, Mass. 

H. L. Chatterton, D. V. M., Peterson, Iowa. 

S. D. Clough, B. S., Pine Bluffs, Arkansas.* 

M. Z. Farwell, B. S., La Junta, Colorado. 

*V. C. Gambell, B. S. 

W. E. Gamble, B. S., 100 State Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

G. W. Greene, B. S. A., 1702 North 26th St., South Omaha, Neb. 
S. H. Hedges, B. C. E., 95 Yesler Way, Seattle, Washington. 
W. B. Hunter, B. S., Buffalo, New York.* 
A. P. Johnson, B. C. E., Sigourney, Iowa. 

E. S. Johnson, D. V. M., Morning Sun, Iowa. 

G. A. Johnson, D. V. M., Exchange Building, Sioux City, Iowa. 



406 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Lizzie Langfitt, B. S., 2650 Cottage Grove Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 
H. J. Langfitt, B. S., Hutchinson, Minnesota. 

W|. R. Myers, B. S., 306 North Ave., 66, Los Angeles, California. 
E. P. Niles, D. V. M., 2109 North Tenth St., Kansas City, Kansas 
M. H. Reynolds, B. S. A., D. V. M., St. Anthony Park, Minnesota. 
O. W. Rich, B. S. A., Kennewick, Washington. 

E. S. Richman, B. S. A., M. S. A., Fullerton, California. 

H. S. Stewart, B. C. E., Texarkana, Texas.* 

J. J. Streets, D. V. M., Los Angeles, California.* 

Cora (Wagner) Hunter, B. S., Des Moines, Iowa.* 

GRADUATES OF 1887. 

G. Z. Barnes, D. V. M., 315-319 Elizabeth Street, Pekin, Illinois. 

S. A. Beach, B. S. A., M. S., Geneva, New York. 

*R. C. Bennett, D. V. M. 

Emil Besser, D. V. M., Remington, Indiana. 

C. M. Canady, B. C. E., Ambridge, Penn. 

Emma (Casey) Scofield, B. L., Glendora, California. 

E. J. Christie, B. S., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
*S. B. Clark, B. S. 

*C. J. Cotey, B. S. 

G. H. Colton, B. S. A., 416 18th Ave, North, Seattle, Washington. 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 855 Fairmont Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 

C. F. CurUss, B. S. A., M. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

A. C. Felt, B. S., Superior, Nebraska. 

C. W. Ferguson, D. V. M., Chappell, Nebraska. 

*W. H. Frater, B. C. E. 

G. S. Govier, B. C. E., Argentine, Kansas. 

F. H. Graves, D. V. M., Madrid, Iowa. 
Norma (Hainer) Beach, B. S., Geneva, New York. 

N. E. Hansen, B. S., M. S., 720 Sixth Ave., Brookings, D. Dakota. 
L. V. Harpel, B . S., 1229 Fourth Street, Boone, Iowa. 
F. W. Hoskins, D. V. M., Beresford, So. Dakota. 

*W. S. Igo, D. V. M. 

E. A. Kirkpatrick, B. S., M. Ph., Fitchburg, Mass. 

F. W. Malley, B. S., M. S., Garrison, Texas. 
O. E. McCarthy, B. C. E., 

A. E. Osborne, B. S., La Porte City, Iowa. 

L. G. Patty, D. V. M., 120 East Fifth Street, Carroll, Iowa. 
Joseph Paxton, B. C. E., 203 West Hallam Street, Aspen, Colorado. 
J. A. Perley, B. C. E., Peterboro, No. Carolina.* 

W. A. Peterson, B. S., 3046 Wentworth Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 

G. R. Randall, B. M. E., Warren, Illinois. 

G. L. Schermerhorn, B. M. E., Schenectady, New York. 

C. L. Spencer, B. S. A., 444 West Monroe St., Jacksonville, Florida. 
G. W. Sturtz, B. S. A., Plainview, Nebraska. 

R. P. Thurtle, D. V. M., Ashawa, Iowa. 

John Tillie, D. V. M., Muscatine, Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 407 

Olive (Wilson) Curtiss, B. L., Station A Ames, Iowa. 
J. W. Wilson, D. V. M., Traer, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1888. 

J. G. Abraham, B. S., R. F. D. No. 1, Mt, Pleasant, Iowa. 

F. W. Ainsworth, D. V. M., Cor. Grotto and Vassar Streets, 

Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 
J. B. Allen, B. S., R. F. D. No. 4. Codaz, Nebraska. 

Clarence Baker, B. C. E., 415 East State Street, Centerville, Iowa, 
Etbel Bartholomew, B. L., Chariton, Iowa. 

Chas. L. Bartholomew, B. S., 622 E. 18th St., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Scott, Bradford, B. S„ Storm Lake, Iowa. 

A. Brandvig, B. S., 331 North Wapello Street, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

G. L. Buffington, D. V. M., Brooklyn, Iowa. 

J. G. Davidson, B. M. E., 529 West 60th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
F. L. Dobbin, B. S., State Center, Iowa. 

*C. A. Finnegan, B. C. E. 

Grant Flora, B. C. E., 120 E. Lincoln Street, Estherville, Iowa. 
W. N. Gladson, B. M. E., 820 W. Maple St., Fayetteville, Arkansas. 
K. H. Granger, B. b., 129 Pleasant Street, South Weymouth, Mass. 
James E. Gyde, B. S., Wardner, Idaho. 

Ella (Henderson) Bartholomew, B. L., 622 E. Eighteenth Street, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Chas. W. Hunt, B. S., Logan, Iowa. 

F. L. Lightner, B. S., Iowa, Louisiana. 

Elizabeth (McClusky) Morrison, B. L., 619 First Avenue, 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Geo. L. Meissner, B. S., Crete, Nebraska. 

Laura Moulton, B. L., 754 Nineteenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
E. K. Paine, D. V. M., Fairburg, Nebraska. 

R. C. Sayers, D. V. M., Fairfield, Iowa. 

E. A. Sheaf e, B. S., 120 South Court Street, Ottumwa, Iowa. 

B. J. Sheldon, B. S., Douglass St., Ames, Iowa. 
E. B. Skinner, B. S., Calliope, Iowa.* 

N. Spencer, B. S., 415 Forest Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 

C. E. Tallman, B. S., Scotts Station, Alabama.* 
W. L. Thompson, B. S., Bayard, Iowa. 

L. C. Tilden, B. S., Kellogg St., Ames, Iowa. 

W. E. Warwick, B. M. E., Whiting, Indiana. 

Nannie E. Waugh, B. L., Manchester, Iowa. 

Florence (Weatherby) Hainer, B. L., 1002 E. Street, Perry, Okla. 

Julia (Wentch) ) Stanton, B. L., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

W. H. Wright, B. S. 

Sherman Yates, B. S., Tipton, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1889. 

C. A. Ashworth, D. V. M., Valley Junct., Iowa. 

James A. Baker, B. S., Muskogee, Indian Ter. 

J. E. Banks, B. C. E., 271 Fisk Street, Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. 



408 



IOWA STATE COLLEGE 



New Madrid, 


Missouri. 


Sioux Rapids, 


Iowa. 


Wooster, 


Ohio. 


Atlantic, 


Iowa. 


Brookings, 


So. Dakota. 


Chinook, 


Montana. 


Edmonds, 


Oklahoma. 


Dunlap, 


Iowa. 



S. W. Beyer, B. S., Ph. D., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

D. B. Bisbee, B. S., M. S., 200 S. Ashland Ave., LaGrange, Illinois. 

*A. E. D. Bosquet, D. V. M. 

W. B. Budrow, B. S., Calli de Morelos, 103 1-2 Guadalajara, 

Jalisco, Mexico. 
*H. W. Chamberlain, B. S. 
*F. H. Cooley, B. C. E. 
Harry B. Day, B. M. E., 
J. E. Durkee, B. S., 
H. A. Gossard, B. S., 

A. L. Graham, B. M. E., 

B. T. Green, B. S., 
Wm. R. Hensen, B. S., 
Nellie Johnson, B. L., 
James A. Kelsey, B. S., M. S., 

C. F. Kimball, B. M. E., 711 Seventh St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
C. W. Lamborn, B. C. E., 184 LaSalle Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
J. A. Meissner, B. S., Reinbeck, Iowa. 

S. W. Morris, B. S., Corning, Iowa. 

John McBirney, D. V. M., Clarinda, Iowa. 

Albert McClelland, B. S., Runnells, Iowa. 

A. A. McLaughlin, B. S., 1060 Twentieth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

S. B. Nelson, D. V. M., 

Belle Newell, B. L., 

I. A. Nichols, B. S., 

John H. Piatt, D. V. M., 

W. H. Rickard, B. C. E., 

P. H. Rolfs, B. S., M. S., 

*John Schoenleber, B. M. E. 

W. U. Scott, B. S., 

John A. Shelton, B. S., 34-35 Hirbour Building, Butte, Montana. 

Wm. R. Shoemaker, B. S., Menomonee, Michigan. 

J. O. Simcoke, D. V. M., Stuart, Iowa. 

Virgil Snyder, B. S., 214 University Avenue, Ithaca, New York. 

* Palmer W. Starr, B. C. E. 

C. H. Stearns, B. S., Santa Rosa, New Mexico. 

Jno. S. Stroud, B. S., 622 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 

M. W. Thornburg, B. S., Redfield, Iowa. 

Rosalia Thurlimann, B. L., Carroll, Iowa. 

Chas. M. Wade, B. S., 1010 Tenth Street, Sioux City, Iowa. 

Mary (Zimbleman) Otis, B. L., 322 Story Street, Boone, Iowa. 

GEADUATES OF 1890. 



Pullman, 


Washington, 


Woodward, 


Iowa. 


Iowa Falls, 


Iowa. 


Montezuma, 


Iowa. 


Texarkana, 


Arkansas.* 


Miami, 


Florida. 


Clarinda, 


Iowa. 



Nettie Bannister, B. L., Cherokee, Iowa. 

J. A. Bishop, B. S., New Hampton, Iowa. 

W. E. Bolles, B. C. E., 63 Johnson Avenue, Richmond Hill, 

New York, New York. 
John A. Bramhall, B. M. E., 317 Court Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Meyer Brandvig, B. S., M. Ph., Spencer, Nebraska. 



Algona, 


Iowa. 


Algona, 


Iowa. 


Blue Earth, 


Minnesota. 


Magnolia, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 409 

J. S. Chamberlain, B. S., M. S., 3020 Irving Place, N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
Herbert E. Crosby, B. S., Fourth Street, Montevideo, Minnesota. 
Chas. D. Davidson, B. M. E., Whiting, Indiana. 

W. C. Dewell, B. S., Magnolia, Iowa. 

Edward N. Eaton, B. S., 1628-315 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 
Mary (Fellows) Weare, B. L., 5121 25th Street, Morton Park, 111. 
Q. C. Fuller, D. V. M., Milford, Iowa. 

*Belle (Gaston) James, B. L. 

T. A. Geddes, D. V. M., Care U. S. Consul, London, England. 
J. M. Graham, B. S., * Audubon, Iowa. 

*May Hardy, B. L. 

Spencer Haven, B. S., Hudson, Wisconsin. 

Eugene Henley, B. S., Brooklyn, Iowa. 

T. S. Howard, B. S., 3624 Third Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Thos. S. Kerr, B .S., 2829 Calumet Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
E. A. Kreger, B. S., Infantry & Cavalry School, 

Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 
Alice Mann, B. S., 
Bertha Mann, B. S., 
James J. McLaughlin, D. V. M., 
Ada (Mills) Dewell, B. L., 

J. C. Norton, D. V. M., 118 W. Washington, St., Phoenix, Arizona. 
Robt. W. Olmstead, B. S., 929 21st Street, Rock Island, Illinois. 
♦Violet U. Quint, B. L. 

Maria, M. Roberts, B. L., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Geo. H. Schulte, B. S., Elkader, Iowa. 

W. H. Shaul, B. S., 507 Equitable Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Kate (Stevens) Harpel, B. L., 812 Eighth Street, Boone, Iowa. 
John T. Stinson, B. S., Mountain G've, Missouri. 

Rodney B. Swift, B. S., 4837 Madison Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Edward Thurlimann, B. S., Carroll, Iowa. 

Leo Thurlimann, B. S., M. S., 1733 Monadnock Bldg., Chicago, 111. 
Cora (Van Velsor) Lambert, B. L., 6435 Jackson Ave., Chicago, 111. 
A. R. Williams, D. V. M., Glenwood, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1891. 

Geo. S. Angus, B. C. E., 38 Forest Ave., Chicago Heights, Illinois. 
Wm. H. Austin, D. V. M., Newton, Iowa.* 

Chas. A. Ballreich, B. S., Central Block, Pueblo, Colorado. 
Sarah T. Barrows, B. L., 85 West Tenth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio. 
Frank J. Brown, B. C. E., Pipestone, Minnesota. 

Donald M. Carter, B. M. E., 1410-204 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. 
Geo. L. Christy, B. C. E., 128 W. 42nd Street, New York City, N. Y. 
*Clinton C. Clarke, B. S. 

Mae (Cottrell) Woods, B. L., 321 Western Ave., Waterloo, Iowa. 
Robert M. Dyer, B. M. E., 95 Yesler Way, Seattle, Washington. 
Wm. A. Heck, D. V. M., Maquoketa, Iowa. 



410 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Wm. H. Heileman, B. S., M. S., Dept. of Agriculture, 

Washington, D. C. 
Rollin E. Hinds, B. C. E., 419 Hawkeye Street, Ottumwa, Iowa. 
R. P. Hodson, B. S., Ames, Iowa. 

E. P. Hudson, B. S., 1408 East Ninth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Thomas B. Hutton, B. S., 1312 Court Street, Le Mars, Iowa. 
Wm. H. Jackson, B. C. E., 1351 12th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Chas. W. Johnson, B. S., 106 Kelly Street, Charles City, Iowa. 
W. Clyde Jones, B. M. E., 5540 Monroe Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Edwin S. King, B. S., R. F. D. No. 1, Grundy Center, Iowa. 
Eleanor (King) Moss, B. L., 1052 20th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
John H. Moore, B. C. E., 814 Foster Street, Evanston, Illinois. 
Berkley N. Moss, B. C. E., C. E., 1052 20th. St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
W. A. McClanahan, D. V. M., Redding, Iowa. 

L. D. McNaughton, B. M. E., 510 W. Broadway, Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Mary (Nichols) Cox, B. L., Chappaqua, New York. 

E. C. Oggel, B. S., 125 North Flower St., Los Angeles, California. 
J. F. Schulte, B. S., Victor, Iowa. 

B. F. Shaum, B. C. E., Col. City, Iowa. 

J. H. Shepperd, B. Ag., M. S. A., 1018 Seventh St., North, 

Fargo, North Dakota. 

F. A. Sirrine, B. S., M. S., 124 Sound Ave., Riverhead, New York. 
Nels Sorenson, D. V. M., Louisville, Kentucky.* 
John E. Spaan, B. S., 918 Law Building, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Grant F. Starkey, D. V. M., Jordan, Iowa. 
Walter D. Steele, B. M. E., N. York City, N. Y.* 
Willis C. Swift, B. M. E., 72 Canal Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

D. A. Thornburg, B. S., 1026 Broad Street, Grinnell, Iowa. 
Samuel Whitheck, D. V. M., Decorah, Iowa. 

Peter M. Wilson, D. V. M., Traer, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1892. 

Charles B. Adams, D. V. M., 2396 116th Street, Chicago, Illinois.* 

Geo. B. Ashford, B. C. E., Nome, Alaska. 

Alice M. Beach, B. S., M. S., Geneva, N. Y. 

R. B. Benjamin, B. S., 1992 Van Buren Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

Estelle (Blaine) Spence, B. L., Polk City, Iowa. 

Emma (Boyd) Jones, B. L., 5540 Monroe Street, Chicago, 111. 

Eugene G. Brown, B. S., Mason City, Iowa.* 

Geo. W. Brown, B. C. E., Boone, Iowa.* 

Inez, J. Christie, B. L., E. St. Louis, Illinois.* 

E. E. Clinton, B. C. E., Lents, Portland, Oregon. 
W. Ross Cooper, D. V. M., Kansas City, Missouri. 
Edgar C. Correy, B. S., 415 Manhattan Bldg., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Genevieve Culver, B. L., Audubon, Iowa. 
Homer Davis, D. V. M., B. S., M. S., 2617 Franklin Street, 

Omaha, Nebraska.* 
Anna (Dean) Blair, B. L., 2923 Logan Ave., E. Des Moines, Iowa. 
Chas. C. Deering, B. S., 1006 Grand Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 411 

C. U. Emery, B. C. B., Fairfield, Iowa. 

Geo. S. Poster, B. C. E., U. P. Headquarters, Omaha, Nebraska. 
Kittie B. Freed, B. L., 1108 Clark Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Ellis T. Gilbert, B. S., 202 N. 8th Street, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Eugene B. Henry, B. S., Klamath Falls, Oregon.* 

Wm. C. Hicks, B. S., 9909 Ewing Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Edwin D. Jones, B. C. E., Hamburg, Kansas.* 

Elmer E. Kaufmann, B. Ag., Bismarck, No. Dakota. 

S. Arthur Knapp, B. S., Pujo Street, Lake Charles, Louisiana. 

F. A. Littell, B. C. E., Audubon, Iowa. 
C. W. Mally, B. S., M. S., Currie Street, Grahams Town, 

Cape Colony, South Africa. 
Jessie (Maxwell) Freeland, B. L., 101 G. St., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Frank L. Meredith, B. S., 1445 21st Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
W. P. Milburn, B. M. E., Eby, California.* 

Gordon P. Miller, B. S., Des Moines, Iowa. 

C. R. Molison, D. V. M., Graettinger, Iowa.* 

Jennie (Morrison) Beyer, B. L., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
Fred R. Muhs, B. C. E., American Bridge Co., San Francisco, Cal. 
Clarice (McCarthy) McNaughton, B. L., 510 W. Broadway, 

Eagle Grove, Iowa. 
Wilton McCarthy, D. V. M., 205 Equitable, Des Moines, Iowa. 
E. S. McCord, D. V. M., Story St., Ames, Iowa. 

Fred S. Phelps, B. S., uournee, Illinois. 

Kate (Porter) Gess, B. S., tot. Anthony, Idaho.* 

*Henry Replogle, D. V. M. 

J. A. Replogle, D. V. M., Udell, Iowa. 

John A. Rolfs, B. S., Eldridge, Iowa. 

T. T. Rutledge, B. Ag. 

J. F. Saylor, B. S., 527 S. Howard Street, Spokane, Washington. 
Robt. J. Sloan, B. S., 313 Kemper Bldg., Kansas City, Missouri. 
L. B. Spinney, B. M. E., Cor. Burnett & Story Sts., Ames, Iowa. 
Fred C. Stewart, B. S., M. S., 48 Brook Street, Geneva, New York. 
Arthur C. Stokes, B. S., 400 Bee Building, Omaha, Nebraska. 
*C. E. Swenson, B. S. 

Walter E. Trotter, B. M. E., 339 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburg, Pa.* 
O. C. Van Houten, B. Ag., Nevada, Iowa. 

H. C. Wallace, B. Ag., 11th and Walnut Streets, Des Moines, Iowa. 

G. S. Waterhouse, D. V. M., Charter Oak, Iowa. 

Hugh H. West, D. V. M., Spurling Building, Elgin, Illinois. 
Elmina T. Wilson, B. C. E., C. E., 19 W. 106th St., New York, N. Y. 
Flora H. Wilson, B. L., Washington, D. C. 

Vincent Zmunt, B. S., Iowa City, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1893. 

Frank W. Austin, B. C. E., Manvel, California.* 

Bert Benjamin, B. M. E., 631 Washington Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
E. C. Boutelle, B. M. E., 31-41 Indiana Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
C. E. Brown, B. E. E., Box 123, Peterboro, Ontario, Canada. 



412 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Alene (Chestek) Stewart, B. L., 48 Brook St., Geneva, New York. 

D. G. Cooper, D. V. M., 2626 Capitol Ave., Omaha, Nebraska.* 
Virginia H. Corbett, B. L., 127 W. Mulberry St., Ft. Collins, Colo. 

F. E. Davidson, B. C. E., 7436 Kimback Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
C. M. Day, D. V. M., bt. Joseph, Missouri.* 
Earl Douglass, B. S., Missouri, Montana.* 
Jennie Downing, B. L., Brookings, So. Dakota. 
Edwin M. Duroe, B. S., Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

R. H. Fairfield, B. Ag., Creston, Iowa.* 

Kate M. Farr, B. L., 316 South Grand Street, Bozeman, Montana. 

E. E. Faville, B. Ag., M. S. A., Sioux City, Iowa. 

James H. Gasson, D. V. M., 309 Erie St., Missouri Valley ,Iowa. 
Margaret (Gifford) Hodson, B. L., Ames, Iowa. 

E. F. Green, B. S., De Smet, So. Dakota. 

J. L. Guernsey, B. C. E., 228 Lombardy Street, Corydon, Iowa. 
W. E. Harriman, B. S., M. D., Cor. Burnett and Story Streets, 

Ames, Iowa. 
C. E. Hart, B. M. E., Davenport, Iowa.* 

W. E. Herring, B. C. E., 224 Bowen Street, St. Louis, Missouri.* 
Royal T. Hodgkins, B. M. E., N. York City, N. Y.* 

Jessie B. Hudson, B. S., B. L., 121 N. Dubuque St., Iowa City, la. 
Geo. W. Hursey, B. S., Upland, California. 

Jno. A. James, B. S., 1006 Carleton Bldg., St. Louis, Missouri. 
James F. Jones, B. S., Wickenburg, Arizona. 

Edward J. Kearney, B. M. E., Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. 

Fred L. Kent, B. Ag., Third and Jefferson Sts., Corvallis, Oregon. 

G. A. Ketterer, B. S., Circle City, Alaska.* 

G. A. Kuehl, B. C. E., 731 Central Avenue, Wilmette, Illinois. 
Willis E. Lincoln, D. V. M., 925 Fatherland St., Nashville, Tenn. 
Willard C. Lusk, B. S., Yankton, So. Dakota. 

John A. Maguire, B. S., 55-56 Burr Block, Lincoln, Nebraska, 
Philip J. Maguire, B. S., 100 Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Berthold W. Manville, B. E. E., Ulysses, Nebraska. 

Ira J. Merrill, B. M. E., 335 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois.* 
Charles L. Miles, B. S., Charles City, Iowa. 

Grace (Mills) Hangeberg, B. L., Clinton, Missouri. 

Ella (Morton) Kearney, B. L., Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. 
C. K. Munns, B. E. E., M. A. in E. E., Corning, Iowa. 
C. A. McCall, D. V. M., Dodge City, Kansas. 

*F. B. McCall, D. V. M. 

G. E. McKim, B. C. E., 3918 E. 19th Street, Kansas City, Missouri. 
Henry N. Nichols, B. S. 2 East Main Street, Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Don. W. Patton, D. V. M., 822 E. 48th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Florence (Parkhill) Kuehl, B. S., B. L., 731 Central Ave., 

Wilmette, Illinois. 
Lavenia Price, B. S., 1602 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Helen Radnich, B. L., Davis City, Iowa.* 

Roscoe G. Rice, B. E. E., 237 Thirtieth Street, Chicago, Illinois.* 
Mary C. Rolfs, B. L., Fairfield, Illinois.* 

W. G. Rundall, B. S., 1206 Adams Street, Chicago, Illinois. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 413 

E. E. Smith, B. S., Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 
♦Evelyn E. Starr, .B .S, B. L. 

F. S. Tufts, D. V. M., 6500 Green Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Belle (Wentch) Wood, B. S., Traer, Iowa. 

B. F. White, D. V. M., Hampton, Iowa. 

Vinnie (Williams) Grattan, B. L., Barr, Colorado. 

GRADUATES OF 1894. 

W. J. Ballard, B. S., Irvington, Iowa.* 

Cassie Pearl Bigelow, B. L., 415 W 22nd Street, Pueblo, Colorado. 

O. N. Bosingham, D. V. M., Ringsted, Iowa. 

Harry S. Bowen, B. M. E., 224 E. 65th Street, Chicago, Illinois.* 

S. D. Bowie, B. Ag., Chelan, Washington.* 

Blanche (Bradley) White, B. L., Hampton, Iowa. 

Wm. J. Burdess, B. M. E., R. F. D. No. 1, Oskaloosa, Iowa. 

Frank. H. Campbell, B. C. E., 1528 Pruitt St., Forth Worth, Texas. 

Iowa Campbell, B. L., Newton, Iowa. 

W. Lee Campbell, B. C. E., Van Buren and Morgan Street, 

Care of Automatic Electric Co., Chicago, Illinois. 
W. G. Carlson, B. S., Willow Lake, So. Dakota.* 

G. W. Carver, B. Ag., Tuskegee, Alabama. 
Ida (Clark) Campbell, B. L., Clear Lake, Iowa.* 
W. R. Cooper, B. S., Newton, Iowa. 

Louis B. Craig, B. M. E., 764 Esplanade, Avenue, Davenport, Iowa. 
Ella (Curtis) Derr, B. L., Independence, Iowa. 

Fannie (Curtiss) Craig, B. L., 764 Esplanade Ave., Davenport, la. 
E. C. Dickinson, B. C. E., 495 Laurel Street, Elgin, Illinois. 
S. R. Fitz, B. S., Rockford, Iowa. 

Annie W. Fleming, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

W. H. Gemmill, B. S., Dallas Center, Iowa. 

Anna Georgen, B. L., Worthington, Iowa. 

Emil, Hansen, B. M. E., Great Falls, Montana.* 

Alvin W. Hoyt, B. S., 1432 Fifth Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Winifred (Hunter) Evans, B. L., Searsboro, Iowa. 

B. D. Knickerbocker, B. M. E., 1233 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111.* 
H. R. Kreger, B. S., Bloomfield, Nebraska.* 

W. G. Langfitt, B. M. E., 1762 Tenth Street, Harlan, Iowa. 

C. G. Lee, B. S., 1208 Burnett Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Charles Lincoln, B. M. E., Ft. Logan, Denver, Colorado. 
Scott W. Linn, B. M. E., Cleveland, Ohio.* 

W. L. Meinzer, B. S., Clark, So. Dakota. 

John Meissner, B. S., Rugby, No. Dakota. 

J. C. Miller, B. C. E., Galesburg, No. Dakota.* 

H. G. Moore, D. V. M., 316 Exchange Bldg., U. S. Yards, Chicago, 

Illinois.* 
Bertha (Mosier) Hays, B. L., Armstrong, Iowa. 

W. A. Murphy, B. C. E., 1341 S. 19th St., St. Joseph, Missouri. 
♦Emma (Pammel) Hansen, B. L., M. S. 
Nora (Person) Sanborn, B. L., Hood River, Oregon. 



Owensboro, 


Kentucky. 


Clinton, 


Iowa.* 


Omaha, 


Nebraska." 


Ames, 


Iowa.* 


Knoxville, 


Iowa. 



414 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Alex McKinnon, B. C. E., Yalesville, Connecticut. 

E. M. McLaughlin, B. E. E., Newton, Iowa. 

A. A. Peters, D. V. M., Winterset, Iowa.* 

Albert M. Price, B. M. E., 376 Chicago Street, Elgin, Illinois. 

C. E. Read, B. Ag., New Virginia, Iowa. 

C. D. Reed, B. Ag., M. S. A., 523 S. 25th Ave., Omaha, Nebraska. 

H. I. Rutledge, B. M. E., Tiffin, Iowa. 

Edith (Ryan) Faville, B. L., 1249 W. 10th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 

W. L. Ryan, B. S., 1141 19th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

G. T. Schlenker, B. S., Ankeny, R. F. D., No. 2, Iowa. 

A. H. Seaver, B. C. E., R. F. D. No. 1, Baldwin, Iowa. 

Harry Shanks, D. V. M., Millersburg, Iowa.* 

Hala (Silliman) Munns, B. L., Corning, Iowa. 

Emma F. Sirrine, B. S., M. S., Dysart, Iowa. 

*H. J. Stevens, D. V. M. 

A. W. Stuntz, B. E. E., 

Clarence Van Epps, B. S. 

Arthur R. Wake, D. V. M., 

Carter B. Weaver, B. S., 

C: O. Williamson, B. E. E., 

Alda H. Wilson, B. C. E., 19 West 106th St., New York, New York. 

Elsworth Wilson, D. V. M., Alva, Oklahoma. 

Elvin J. Wilson, D. V. M., No. English, Iowa.* 

J. T. Young, B. M. E., Hydro, Oklahoma. 

GRADUATES OF 1895. 

Arthur J. Ashby, B. E. E., 530 Harrison Ave., Canon City, Colo. 
Florence (Baker) McManus, B. S., 1110 E. Pierce St., Council 

Bluffs, Iowa. 
Elmer D. Ball, B. S., M. S., 351 N. 4th St., East Logan, Utah. 
A. J. Banks, B. M. E., Montour, Iowa. 

A. W. Bitting, D. V. M., B. S., 320 State St., LaFayette, Indiana. 
Richard Blanche, D. V. M., 1009 7th St., Las Vegas, N. Mexico. 
C. E. Brockhausen, B. M. E., 1208 Unity Bldg., Chicago, Illinois. 
I. C. Brownlie, B. S., D. D. S., 623 Malk Bldg., Denver, Colorado. 
Charles R. Cave, B. M. E., Waverly, Iowa. 

J. W. Crawford, B. S., Fort Morgan, Colorado. 

Erne (Curtiss) Campbell, B. L., 1528 Pruitt St., Fort Worth, Texas. 
J. G. Danielson, B. A., R. F. D. No. 3,Gourie, Iowa. 

J. R. Davidson, B. S., Louisville, Kentucky.* 

E. T. Davison, D. V. M. 

Ruth (Duncan) Tilden, B. L., Kellogg Street, Ames, Iowa. 
C. R. Duroe, B. M. E., Jeffers, Minnesota. 

W. J. Eck, B. M. E., 22 Fifth Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
C. H. Eckles, B. Ag., M. S. A., Columbia, Missouri. 

A. H. Foster, B. M. E., 420 Third Street, Red Wing, Minnesota. 
Jerome B. Frisbee, B. Ag., 1200 High St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Burt German, B. M. E., Actual Business Univ., Fremont, Ohio. 
Clarence Goddard, B. C. E., 



Nira, 


Iowa.* 


Pony, 


Montana.* 


Carlsbad, 


N. Mexico. 


Stillwater, 


Oklahoma. 


Cornell, 


Iowa. 


Manly, 


Iowa. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 415 

W. E. Gossard, B. S., Webster City, Iowa. 

Geo. D. Gunn, B. S., Lexington, Nebraska. 

Geo. W. Harden, B. S., White Sulphur Springs, Montana. 
A. C. Helmer, B. M. E., 1031 Brady Street, Davenport, Iowa. 

D. M. Hosford, B. M. E., M. E., 186 Oakdale St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
N. C. Hurst, B. M. E., Burlington, Iowa.* 

Chas. S. Hutchinson, B. S., M. S., M. D., 3 & 4 Bunch-Allison Bldg., 

Harrison, Arkansas. 
*Ira B. Johnson, B. S. 

Raymond Johnson, D. V. M., Arkansas City,Kansas. 

Fred J. Lazell, B. S., 1557 Washington Ave., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
C. C. Lewis, B. M. E., 
H. T. Lewis, B. M. E., 
John W. Lewis, B. C. E., 
L. L. Lewis, D. V.. M., 
G. W. Louthan, B. Ag., M. S. A., 
F. R. Lyford, B. C. E., 
Nellie Maguire, B. L., 249 Selby Ave., St. Paul, Minnesota.* 
A. E. Mellinger, B. M. E., 59 Aberdeen St., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. H. Meyers, B. Ag., Spokane, Washington. 

Lillian Mills, B. L., Jefferson, Iowa. 

J. A. Moore, B. C. E., 475 E. 48th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
W. R. McCready, B. C. E., 1027 Morse Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Mary (McNeill) Aten, B. L., Garden Grove, Iowa. 

*Hulda M. Nelson, B. S. 

Wm. J. Oliver, B. S., Chicago Heights, Chicago, Illinois. 
M. J. Orr, B. M. E., 1812 Douglass Street, Sioux City, Iowa.* 
Mabel Ruth (Owen) Wilcox, B. L., Washington, D. C* 
Lola A. Placeway, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

*John M. Preston, B. Ag. 

Erwin E. Reed, B. S., Monticello, Iowa. 

Thomas L. Rice, D. V. M., 468 E. 48th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
W. D. Rich, B. S., 519 State St., Ames, Iowa. 

Albert Richmond, B. C. E., Edmunds, No. Dakota. 

F. S. Roop, D. V. M., 214 14th Street, Charlottsville, Virginia.* 
Ethel B. Rundall, B. S., Emmetsburg, Iowa. 

*Geo. D. Sabin, B. M. E. 

J. C. Sample, B. C. E., Lebanon, Iowa.* 

Roger S. Sanborn, B. S., Hood River, Oregon. 

Frank H. Schleiter, B. M. E., Galva, Iowa. 

J. I. Schulte, B. Ag., 1921 13th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
John M. Sokol, B. S., Spencer, Iowa. 

W. J. Thomas, B. C. E., 148 W. 128th Street, New York, New York. 
R. H. Walker, B. M. E., Osage, Iowa.* 

Etta J. Whipple, B. S., 506 Lee Avenue, Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Chas. A. Wilson, B. Ag., 93-95 Exchange Bldg., Stock Yards, 

Chicago, Illinois. 

E. R. Wilson, B. Ag., Chenoy, Washington.* 
O. P. Woodburn, B. M. E., Rock Rapids, Iowa.* 



416 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

John I. Wright, B. Ag., Kilduff, Iowa.* 

Laura (Wyatt) Cutler, B. S., Harlan, Iowa.* 

GRADUATES OF 1896. 

Mildred Anderson, B. L., Jewell, Iowa. 

Carlton R. Ball, B. S., M. S., 1621 1st St., N. W., Washington, D.C. 
Hazel (Beardshear) Chambers, B. L., 502 Colorado Bldg., Denver, 

Colorado. 
J. F. Blakemore, B. C. E., Room 603 Pacific Blk., Seattle, Wash. 
E. N. Bonnell, B. S., 102 N. St. Albans St., St. Paul, Minnesota. 
W. A. Bryan, B. S., Bishop Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii Islands. 
Agnes M. Cole, B. S., Ames, Iowa. 

*Robert Combs, B. S., M. S. 

B. G. Dunham, B. M. E., 1595 Main St. E., Rochester, New York. 
Raymond B. Eckles, B. Ag., Aplington, Iowa. 

J. J. Edgerton, B. Ag., 3141 Elliott Avenue, Berv^yn, Illinois. 
Jas. W. Elliott, B. C. E., Toledo, Ohio.* 

Nettie A. Fibbs, B. C. E., 1217 Fifth Ave. S., Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Edith (Foster) Orr, B. S., 1329 Jennings St., Sioux City, Iowa. 
Ella (French) Robinson, B. S., Hampton, Iowa. 

Frank C. French, B. C. E., Sta. A., Ames, Iowa. 

L. M. Goodman, B. M. E., Britt, Iowa. 

Maud Hursey, B. L., Morvia, Iowa.* 

C. P. Johnson, B. S., 2142 Maple Ave., Evanston, Illinois. 

C. F. Langlass, B. M. E., 271 Parker St., Newark, New Jersey. 
R. R. Landon, B. M. E., 1115 G. St., N. W., Washington, D. C* 
Myrtle (Little) Fowler, B. L., 310 Duff Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Nora B. Lockwood, B. S., 802 East 9th Street, Sheldon, Iowa. 
E. C. Macy, B. C. E., 70 Seymore Ave., S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Stella (McLain) Lawrence, B. L., 1303 Carroll St., Boone, Iowa. 
Carl H. McLean, B. Ag., M. Ph., Baxter, Iowa.* 

Mary J. Maguire, B. S., Creighton, Nebraska.* 

T. J. Mahoney, B. S., 1221 Greene Street, Boone, Iowa. 
*Watson Mason, B. M. E. 
Fred W. Matthews, B. S. r Jefferson, Iowa.* 



Ira J. Meade, B. Ag., 


M. Ag., R. F. D. No. 1, 


Indianola, Iowa. 


C. C. Mills, B. S., 


Linden, 


Iowa.* 


S. B. Mills, B. Ag., R. 


F. D. No. 3, Ames, 


Iowa. 


C. O. Pool, B. S., 


Bedford, 


Iowa.* 


Lillian Porterfield, B. 


S., Dundee, 


Illinois. 


Herbert L. Preston, B. 


S., Brocksburg, 


Nebraska. 


Ivan B. Roscoe, B. S. 


, Camanche, 


Iowa. 



Rose (Rummel) Smith, B. S., 914 Kellogg Street. Ames, Iowa. 
E. A. Sherman, B. S., Hamilton, Montana. 

C. H. Speers, B. M. E., Pleasant Hill, Missouri. 

G. L. Steelsmith, B. S., Fairbanks, Alaska. 

Henry C. Taylor, B. Ag., M. Ag., 1214 W. Johnson St..Madison, Wis. 
R. G. Weaver, B. S., Box 8, Oakland, California. 

W. W. Wentch, B. M. E., Kansas City, General Delivery, Missouri. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 417 

B. W. Wilson, B. Ag., Butte, Montana.* 
James W. Wilson, B. Ag., M. S. A., Brookings, South Dakota. 
A. L. Zinser, B. S., Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 

G. W. Zorn, B. C. E., Cody, Wyoming. 

GRADUATES OF 1897. 

Mary Barger, B. S., Ontario, Iowa.* 

C. A. Bergeman, B. M. E., Grant Works, Illinois.* 

E. C. Bierbaum, B. S., Walla Walla, Washington.* 

F. W. Bouska, B. Ag., M. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Guy S. Brewer, B. S., 2925 Rutland Ave., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Andrew Brown, B. S., Whitaker Building, Davenport, Iowa.* 
Jas. R. Burnip, B. S., Montevideo, Minnesota. 

Orange R. Cole, B. S., in E. E., Seattle, Washington.* 

Robt. A. Craig, D. V. M., 621 Owen St., Lafayette, Indiana. 
Philip E. Damon, B. Ag., Harrison, Arkansas. 

Geo. G. Dana, B. M. E., 2311 Washington Ave., Racine, Wisconsin. 
Ole Davidson, B. C. E., 3805 N. 18th St., Omaha, Nebraska. 
Gwendolen (Doxsee) Reed, B. L., Monticello, Iowa. 
L. A. Duroe, B. S., Jeffers, Minnesota. 

L. Mae (Fellows) Banks, B. L., Montour, Iowa. 

W. C. Garberson, B. S., Sibley, Iowa. 

O. H. Gersbach, B. C. E., 6553 Harvard Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Blanche (Greeley) Wilson, B. L., Chicago, Illinois. 

C. A. Hartman, B. S., 723 E. 12th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Glen D. Heald, B. M. E., 13th & Arch Sts., Philadelphia, Penn. 
Margaret Jones, B. S., Winnetka, Chicago, Illinois. 

Ward M. Jones, B. C. E., 1003 Burnett Street, Ames, Iowa. 
W. S. Joseph, B. C. E., 403 N. Maple Street, Creston, Iowa. 
Robt. E. King, B. S. in E. E., Cripple Creek, Colorado.* 
Helen (Knapp) Fay, B. L., 822 Seventh St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
E. P. Kribbs, B. Min. E., Clarissa, Minnesota. 

Chas. E. LeBuhn, B. S., 626 W. 15th St., Davenport, Iowa. 
Frank W. Linebaugh, B. M. E., Iowa Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Thomas W. Mast, B. Ag., Big Elm Farm, Dahlonega, Iowa. 
Elizabeth (Morphy) Tilden, B. L., 915 Hoggatt St., Ames, Iowa. 
Joseph Morrison, B. C. E., Boone, Iowa. 

Frank McConnon, B. S., Monticello, Iowa.* 

Geo. B. McWilliams, B. C. E., Waterloo, Iowa. 

Wilmon Newell, B. S., M. S., State Entomologist, Atlanta, Georgia. 
E. A. Pattengill, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Geo. W. Patterson, B. S. in E. E., 257 Rice St., St. Paul, Minn.* 
Allan Rae, B. M. E., Lincoln & Forest Aves., Grossdale, Illinois. 
Edith Redmond, B. L., R. F. D. No. 1, Hedrick, Iowa. 
Emerson G. Reed, B. S. in E. E., Elkhart, Indiana.* 
Edward F. Rhodenbaugb, B. S., 1605 Washington St., Boise, Idaho. 
Ambrose C. Rice, B. S., Baptist College, Rangoon, Burma, India. 
Moss F. Rolfe, B. S., Goodell, Iowa.* 

Margaret Rutherford, B. S., Mayville, No. Dakota. 

27 



418 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

A. F. Sample, B. Ag., Lebanon, Iowa.* 

Herman T. Schmidt, B. S. in E. E., 1342 W. 3rd St., Davenport, la. 
Frank B. Spencer, B. S. in E. E., 1325 First Natl. Bank Bldg., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Geo. L. Sterns, B. S. in E. E., Edgerton, Minnesota. 

Olive E. Stevens, B. L., 915 Hoggatt Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Clarence E. Tanton, B. S., 415 Boone Street, Boone, Iowa. 
Hannah M. Thomas, B. S., Corning, Iowa.* 

Minta (Tilden) Macy, B. L., 70 Seymore Ave., S. E., Minneapolis, 

Minnesota. 

E. R. Townsend, B. M. E., 318 E. State St., Columbus, Ohio. 
John J. Vernon, B. Ag., Mesilla Park, New Mexico, 
Ida L. Watkins, B. L., Grundy Center, Iowa. 
Jasper Wilson, B. Ag., 1022 Vermont Ave., Washington, D. C. 
Lawrence Winnie, B. S., Humboldt, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1898. 

M. C. Adamson, B. S., Dana, Iowa.* 

Ralph W. Barclay, B. Ag., Mason City, Iowa. 

Amanda J. Barger, B. L., Ontario, Iowa.* 

Esther (Beatty) Ketchum, B. L., 1121 11th St., Boulder, Colorado. 
J. N. Bonnell, B. S. in E. E., 1025 South 2d St., Springfield, Illinois. 
Leora May Bonwell, B. S., Ross, R. F. D. llowa. 

Otis Boyd, B. S., Roland, Iowa. 

Harvey Bozarth, B. M. E., E. Pittsburg, Penn. 

C. J. Bristol, B. M. E., Globe Machinery & Sup. Co., Des Moines, la. 
Harry F. Brown, B. S., 1205 Kellogg Street, Ames, Iowa. 
J. C. Brown, B. Ag., Agricultural Hall, Madison, Wisconsin. 
Olive Z. Brown, B. L., 401 North 24th St., South Omaha, Nebraska. 
Ena (Burnham) Eckles, B. L., Aplington, Iowa. 

Glenn C. Clark, B. S., N. K. Fairbank Co., Chicago, Illinois. 
Margaret (Cooper) Forde, B. L., 4th & Huron Sts., Mo. Valley, la. 
John Craig, B. Ag., 3 East Avenue, Ithaca, New York. 
W. J. Devine, B. S. in E. E., 239 Seventh Ave., Clinton, Iowa. 
Gordon F. Dodge, B. M. E., 6329 Jefferson Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Harry E. Dyer, B. S., St. Louis, Missouri.* 

W. C. Edson, B. S., 219 Cayuga St., Storm Lake, Iowa. 
Ada (Ellis) Johnson, B. L., 2142 Maple Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. 
Sadie Ellis, B. L., 30 Koun Mita, Shiba, Tokyo, Japan. 
Harry J. Evans, B. < S., Humboldt, Iowa.* 

F. F. Faville, B. S., 116 Cayuga St., Storm Lake, Iowa. 
Oliver J. Fay, B. S., 822 Seventh Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Elmer Franklin, B. S., 815 Central St., Kansas City, Missouri. 
Orville S. Franklin, B. S., 406 Youngerman Blk., Des Moines, la. 
James Galloway, B. M. E., Milwaukee, Wisconsin.* 
Thomas Galloway, B. M. E., 129 Lincoln Ave., Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Theron S. Grant, B. S., Lusk, Wyoming. 

H. N. Grettenberg, B. Ag., M. S., Lockland, Ohio.* 

J. H. Grisdale, B. Ag., Central Experimental Farm, Ottawa, Can. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 419 

Wm. H. Grover, B. S. in B. B., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

M. J. Hammer, B. C. E., 4779 North Clark St., Chicago, Illinois. 

C. J. Heckard, D. V. M., Wheatland, Iowa. 

O. J. Henderson, B. S., 836 Elm Street, Webster City, Iowa. 

B. H. Hibbard, B. Ag., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

E. R. Hodson, B. S., M. S., 64 Lake Place, New Haven, Connecticut. 
♦Ralph H. Hollenbeak, B. C. E. 

Sarah C. (Hook) Passig, B. L., Humboldt, Iowa. 
M. R. Hull, B. S. in E. E., 421 N. St. Clair St., Pittsburg, Penn. 
Ewing M. Johnson, B. S., Cnarles City, Iowa. 

Irene (Jones) Bonnell, B. S., 1025 South 2d St., Springfield; 111. 
*Axel Rolling, D. V. M. 

J. C. Kyle, B. S. in E. E., E. Pittsburg, Penn. 

Kate (LaRue) Rodgers, B. L., Van Horn, Iowa. 
Edward E. Little, B. Ag., M. S. A., 202 Onandoga St., Ames, Iowa. 
John B. Love, B. Ag., Everett, Washington.* 

Fred R. Lowery, B. S. in E. E., Hazle Block, Spokane, Washington. 
Fred N. Lewis, B. C. E., Y. M. C. A. Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn.* 
W. H. Meek, B. S., Howard, So. Dakota. 

Royal Meeker, B. S., Collegeville, Penn. 

Roger C. Mills, B. Ag., Fort Wright, Spokane, Washington. 
David W. Morgan, B. E. E., 511 S. Broadway St., Albuquerque, 

New Mexico. 

C. J. McCusker, B. S., Huntington, Oregon. 
Will G. McKay, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Pearl (McWilliams) Stetzel, B. S., 222 Maple St., Waterloo, Iowa. 

Geo. E. Nesom, D. V. M., B. S., Clemson College, South Carolina.* 

Jessie J. Parker, B. S., Cross Street, Ames, Iowa. 

*A. J. Perrin, B. C. E. 

Eugene D. Perry, B. S., 406 Youngerman Blk., Des Moines, Iowa. 

Marius J. Pos, B. M. E., 6327 Jefferson Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

E. G. Preston, B. Ag., Battle Creek, Iowa. 
Elizabeth (Read) Cohn, B. L., 529 West 3rd St., Los Angeles, Calif. 
Alice E. Reed, B. L., Monticello, Iowa. 

O. W. Roe, D. V. M., Utica, Iowa.* 

Stella Russell, B. L., Storm Lake, Iowa. 

J. Harry Scurr, B. Ag., Gilman, Iowa. 

H. W. Skinner, B. ML E., Swift & Co., Chicago, Illinois.* 

Dollie (Snelson) Hogan, B. S., Massena, Iowa. 

Edwin M. Stanton, B. S., 588 Madison Ave., Albany, New York. 

F. C. Stetzel, B. S., 222 Maple Street, Waterloo, Iowa. 

C. T. Stevens, B. S., 169 Centre Ave., New Rochelle, New York. 
Mabelle (Stewart) Wright, B. L., Los Angeles, California. 
Simon W. Tarr, B. C. E., 614 East 2d St., Duluth, Minnesota. 
Margaret Taylor, B. L., 1015 E. Main St., Estherville, Iowa. 
Wm. C. Tilden, B. S., Stanwood, Iowa. 

Harry E. Titus, D. V. M., Box 25, Lafayette, Indiana. 
Annie (Walker) Kingsbury, B. S., 613 Pine St., Osage, Iowa. 
Wm. M. Warden, B. Ag., R. F. D. No. 1, Melbourne, Iowa. 
Lorena Webber, B. S., 915 Hoggatt Street, Ames, Iowa. 



420 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

A. P. Whitmore, B. Ag., 1214 Farnam Street, Omaha, Nebraska. 

Ira Williams, B. S., M. S., Sta. A., Ames, Iowa. 

John H. Wykoff, B. C. E., 185 Fenelow Place, Dubuque, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1899. 

Howard W. Adams, B. S., 139 College Street, Elgin, Illinois. 
J. R. Allen, B. S., 2252 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
R. C. Anderson, B. S. in M. E., 318 Hanover St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
H. B. Bolks, B. S., 1635 C. Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Geo. W. Brooks, B. S. in E. E., 1077 S. Ridgeway Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Clare (Campbell) McCusker, B. S., Huntington, Oregon. 
Elsie (Davis) Malcolm, B. Ph., 1335 Wilton Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. W. Deering, B. C. E., 922 Washington St., Evanston, Illinois. 
Howard L. Eckles, B. S., Marshalltown, Iowa.* 

F. Ora (Edgett) Dow, B. S., Hoggatt St., Ames, Iowa. 

G. H. Ehlers, B. S., Thornton, Iowa. 

H. O. Fritzel, B. S., R. F. D. No. 1, De Smet, South Dakota. 
Lucy A. Giffen, B. Ph., 917 Cauldwell Ave., New York, New York. 
Fannie M. Gilbert, B. Ph., Gilbert Station, Iowa. 

John L. Gillespie, B. S. in E. E., 1453 E. Grand Ave., Des Moines, la 
A. R. Glaisyer, D. V. M., 143 Calle Cabildo, Manila, Philippine Ids. 
Katherine Goble, B. Ph., 823 Kellogg Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Racine D. Goble, B. S., Ames, Iowa. 

E. E. Granger, B. S., Kasbeer, Illinois. 

C. J. Griffith, B. S. A., 125 W. Mulberry St., Ft. Collins, Colorado. 
Walter I. Griffith, B. S. A., Victor, Iowa. 
Roland O. Hayter, B. M. E., 716 N. Madison St., Mason City, Iowa. 
Alice (Hess) Myers, B. S., M. S., New Franklin, Missouri. 
L. C. Hodson, B. C. E., Lead, So. Dakota. 

D. E. Hollingsworth, B. S. A., East Peru, Iowa. 
Arthur G. Hopkins, B. S. A., 191 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, 

Manitoba, Canada. 
John C. Horning, B. S. in E. E., 1218-22 Marquette Bldg., Chicago, 

Illinois. 
H. Harold Hume, B. S. A., M. S. A., 530 N. Wilmington St., 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 

E. W. Humphrey, D. V. M., Spinson, Iowa.* 

M. S. Hyland, B. S. in E. E., 661 Burling St., Chicago, Illinois.* 

W. J. Kennedy, B. S. A., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

Wm. H. Leathers, B. S. in E. E., Mapleton, Iowa. 

C. P. Liegrot, D. V. M., Greenfield, Iowa. 

John P. Lund, B. S., Saint Ansgar, Iowa. 

Erna Maguire, B. S., Beardsley, Minnesota. . ,' 

Norman J. Malcolm, B. S. in E. E., 1335 Wilton Ave., Chicago, 111: 

W. S. Marston, B. M. E., 4405 West Belle St., St. Louis, Missouri. 

Edith Metcalf, B. Ph., Fayette, Idaho. 

*Ethel Ray Mills, B. Ph. 

Ruth Morrison, B. Ph., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

F. H. McQuiston, B. S. in E. E,, 707 S. 4th St., Fairfield, Iowa. 



LIST OF GKADUATES 421 

Fay I. Nichols, B. C. E., City Engineer's Office, Manila, P. I. 
George D. Nicoll, B. S. in E. E., 1720 Railway Exchange, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Thomas E. Nicoll, B. S. in E. E., 332 Germania Ave., 

Schenectady, New York. 
Chester M. Perrin, B. S., Mapleton, Iowa. 

Russell Read, B. S., Douglass Street, Ames, Iowa. 

F. J. Rettenmaier, B. S., Main Street, Carroll, Iowa. 
Chas. Rhinehart, B. S. A., Dallas Center, Iowa. 

Harry V. Rice, B. S. in E. E., El Paso, Texas. 

Fordyce W. Rhodes, B. S., Whatcom, Washington.* 

Guy Roberts, B. S., Webb, Iowa. 

Burton R. Rogers, D. V. M., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Geo. M. Rommel, B. S. A., 1929 Cincinnati St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 
Chas. F. Rottler, B. S., 615 Oak Park Ave., Des Moines, Iowa.* 
H. W. Sayles, B. S. in E. E., 501 W. Park Place, Peoria, Illinois. 

D. J. Scholten, B. S., Alton, Iowa. 
Frank A. Schuetz, B. S., Perham, Minnesota. 
Annie (Seaver) Seaver, B. Ph., Beloit, Wisconsin.* 
Geo. A. Smith, B. C. E., 1705 W. 12th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
S. P. Smith, D. V. M., Corvallis, Oregon.* 

C. F. Spring, B. S., 347 Bothwell Bldg., 6th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
C. A. Steele, B. S. A., Ogden, Iowa. 

Wayne Stillman, D. V. M., Anthon, Iowa. 

James M. Stimson, B. S., Republican C'y Nebraska. 

F. V. Stout, B. S. A., Stout, lowa. 

Adele H. Stuhr, B. Ph., Minburn, Iowa. 

E. R. Thomas, B. S., Correctionville, Iowa. 
Alice M. Tooley, B. Ph., 116 S. 7th St., Council Bluffs, Iowa. 
Mame Tooley, B. Ph., 1205 O'Farrell St., San Francisco, Calif. 
E. B. Tuttle, B. S. in E. E., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

J. E. Van Liew, B. S. in E. E., Des Moines Brick & Iron Works, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
Maude Wakefield, B. P., Ames, Iowa. 

Roy A. Walker, B. S. in E. E., 1603 Bluff St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
J. C. Welch, B. S. in E. E., 2221 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 
Jeannette (Younie) Prusia, B. S., Odebolt, Iowa. 

GRADUATES OF 1900. 

Linton P. Bennett, B. S., Ferndale, Washington. 

Frank S. Bone, B. S., R. F. D. No. 2, Grand River, Iowa. 
John W. Bunker, B. S. A., Winterset, Iowa. 

Melville Cumming, B. S. A., Truro, Novia Scotia Co., Canada. 
Wm. E. Day, D. V. M., Exchange Bldg., St. Joseph, Missouri. 
Chas. W. Deming, D. V. M., San Marco Flats, Spokane, Wash. 
Leroy L. Diller, B. S. A., Grundy Center, Iowa. 

Ella E. Down, B. Ph., 1125 Pleasant St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Maude F. Eastwood, B. Ph., Cedar City, Utah. 



422 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

*Chas. A. Egger, B. S. in E. E.' 

C. E. Ellis, B. S. A., M. S. A., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 
Estella Ellis, B. Ph., 802 West Main St., Marshalltown, Iowa. 
F. W. Faurot, B. S., Mountain G've, Missouri. 

A. L. Haecker, B. S. A., 503 South 26th St., Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Hattie Hasbrouck, B. Ph., Humeston, Iowa. 

Paul Hensen, B. S., Chinook, Montana. 

Wm. A. Houghton, B. S. A., Norway, Iowa. 

Delia (Johnson) Butler, B. Ph., 2008 Rockfeller Ave., Everett, 

Washington. 
Samuel P. Johnson, B. S. in E. E., Jefferson, Iowa. 

Western L. Johnson, D. V. M., 824 North Main St., Pueblo, Colo. 
Birdie C. Kegley, B. S., 308 15th Street, Olympia, Washington. 
Susa A. (Kelsey) Breckon, B. Ph., Manchester, Iowa. 
Addie L. Knight, B. Ph., Green Hall, University of Chicago, 

Chicago, Illinois. 

E. G. LeClere, B. S., Quanah, Texas. 
Sybil M. Lentner, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
Martin Lewis, B. M. E., Oelwein, Iowa. 

John L. Lowe, D. V. M., Still School of Oesteopathy, Des Moines, 

Iowa.* 

F. R. Marshall, B. S. A., College Station, Texas.* 

Wm. H. Mast, B. S. A., Yale Forest School, New Haven, Conn. 
John F. McBirney, B. S. in E. E., C. & G. W. R'y, Byron, Illinois* 
Wilson F. McDill, B. S .A., Creston, Iowa.* 

A. D. McKinley, B. S., Clermont, Iowa. 

Nellie M. Nicholas, B. Ph., Montezuma, Iowa. 

Brete C. Nowlan, B. S. in E. E., 6521 Yale Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
A. Estella Paddock, B. S., 3 West 29th St., New York City, N. Y. 
Henry J. Palmer, B. S. A., St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Foster F. Parker, D. V. M., 301 S. First St., Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
Sophia Schott, B. Ph., What Cheer, Iowa. 

Ira J. Scott, B. S., Roland, Iowa. 

Frisbie T. Suit, D. V. M., 212 N. 21st St., St. Joseph, Missouri. 
H. H. Thomas, B. S., 637 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
Evahn R. Walker, B. S., 527 S. Dubuque St., Iowa City, Iowa. 
Chas. S. White, B. S., Audubon, Iowa. 

Wilbur M. Wilson, B. M. E., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

Ray W. Wortman, B. S. in E. E., 1279 W. Polk St., Chicago, 111. 

GRADUATES OF 1901. 

J. C. Blumer, B. S. A., 535 South 5th Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
M. D. Crane, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa. 

Herbert C. Eckles, B. S.' A., R. F. D. No. 5, Marshalltown, Iowa. 
W. D. Fitzwater, B. S., 178 Prospect Park, West, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
H. F. Garver, B. C. E., American Bridge Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
C. E. Gray, B. S. A., 622 Polk Street, Topeka, Kansas. 
Ernest H. Hall, B. S. A., Iowa City, Iowa.* 

Henry S. Hopkins, B. S. A., Bainbridge, New York. 



LIST OF GRADUATES 423 

Jas. F. Horner, B. S. A., Ashley, Missouri. 

Ole C. Hovland, B. S. in E. E., Van Buren & Morgan St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Roland J. Kinzer, B. S. A., 502 Moro St., Manhattan, Kansas. 
Willis E. Lamb, B. S. in E. E., Ill Loomis St., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. C. Lathrop, B. C. E., 416 W. 124th Street, New York, New York. 
James Madsen, D. V. M., Washington, D. C* 

Frank G. Miller, B. S. A., University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr. 
Edgar C. Myers, B. S. A., M. S. A., New Franklin, Missouri. 
R. C. Obrecht, B. S. A., 510 West High Street, Urbana, Illinois. 
Elmer Peshak, B. S. in E. E., Chicago, Illinois.* 

Hattie A. Pike, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Harry R. Porter, B. S. A., Grafton, Nebraska. 

Edw. E. Savre, B. S. in E. E., Ill Loomis St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Geo. F. Sokol, B. S. A., Onslow, Iowa. 

Ernest D. Stivers, B. S., Parker, So. Dakota. 

Geo. A. Taylor, B. C. E., 42 North Front St., Wheeling, W. Virginia. 
J. E. Van Liew, B. C. E., Des Moines Brick & Iron Works, 

Des Moines, Iowa. 
Dan A. Wallace, B. S. A., Mora, Minnesota.* 

Ed. H. Webster, B. S. A., 1326 East 18th Ave., Denver, Colorado. 

GRADUATES OF 1902. 

Fred R. Ahlers, D. V. M., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 

Jos. C. Austin, B. M. E., Topeka, Kansas* 

Arthur F. Baldwin, D. V. M., 313 Montgomery St., Creston, Iowa. 
Florence D. Barber, B. S., 821 Lake Avenue, Racine, Wisconsin. 
Josephine Barclay, B. S., Pocatello, Idaho. 

L. May Barger, B. S., Ontario, Iowa. 

Jesse D. Bell, B. S. A., Bellwood, Nebraska. 

H. A. Bennett, B. C. E., 3132 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 
Geo. W. Blanche, D. V. M., Belle Plaine, Iowa. 

Walter C. Bower, D. V. M., 702 Main Street, Ft. Worth, Texas. 
Franklin Brown, B. ' S. A., Boone, Iowa. 

Grace Campbell, B. S., Newton, Iowa. 

Jos. R. Campbell, D. V. M., St. Louis, Missouri.* 

Geo. L. Carter, B. S., La Kota, No. Dakota. 

M. P. Cleghorn, B. S. in E. E., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 
John S. Coye, B. S., 510 Reed Street, Red Oak, Iowa. 
Clarence L. Elliott, D. V. M., St. Joseph, Missouri.* 

Frank D. Elwell, B. M. E., 1011 Ohio Avenue, Sidney, Ohio. 
Fred N. Elwell, D. V. M., Room 332 Live Stock Exchange, 

Kansas City, Kansas. 
J. T. Felton, B. S. in E. E., 1728 Spofford Ave., Spokane, Wash. 
J. H. Frandson, B. S. A., M. S. A., Portland, Hazelwood 

Creamery Co., Oregon. 
John H. Gould, D. V. M., Fort Riley, Kansas. 

Ralph F. Graham, D. V. M., Natl. Stock Yards, St. Clair, Illinois. 
Emma Hancock, B. S., 49 S. Vine Street, West Union, Iowa. 



424 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Sam M. Hanger, B. S. A., Parmington Stage Route, Durango, Colo. 
E. C. Higgins, B. S. in E. E., 2622 Fulton St., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. G. Hummel, B. M. E., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Wilbur H. Hurst, D. V. M., Chadron, Nebraska. 

Thyra Hytland, B. S., 203 Duff Street, Ames, Iowa. 
A. T. JenKins, B. S. in E. E., 213 Elysian Ave., Pittsburg, Penn. 
Ada Jenks, B. S., Ishkeming, Michigan! 

Frances (Jenks) Cleghorn, B. S., Station A, Ames, Iowa. 
Robt. R. Keith, B. M, E., St. Louis, Missouri.* 

Walter T. Kelly, B. M. E., 346 West 67th St., Chicago, Illinois. 
C. Larsen, B. S. A., M. S. A., Clarke Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Ernest E. Lee, B. M. E., 346 W. 67th Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
H. J. Ludwig, B. C. E., 1933 Wesley Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. 
W .H. Lytle, D. V. M., Lovelock, Nevada. 

Clive G. Martin, D. V. M., 1336 W. 8th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Alice (Merritt) Parks, B. S., 647 S. Idaho St., Butte, Montana. 
Mae Miller, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Walter E. Miller, D. V. M., 428 W. Main St., Cherokee, Iowa. 
Chas. Morgan, D. V. M., Flint, Michigan.* 

M. Ethelda Morrison, B. S., Mount Carroll, Illinois. 

Louis R. Muhs, B. C. E., Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 

J. F. McBirney, B. C. E., 1202 Washington St., Boise, Idaho. 
Harry B. McClure, B. S. A., Dallas Center, Iowa.* 

Homer A. Mclntire, D. V. M., Olive Street, Maquoketa, Iowa. 
R. C. McKinney, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

T. E. Nichols, B. S. in E. E., 217 S. 6th St., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
E. R. Nowlan, B. S. in E. E., 6521 Yale Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
W. W. Otto, B. S., 163 Henry Street, Detroit, Michigan. 
Luella Rantschler, B. S., 405 W. 13th Street, Pueblo, Colorado. 
Newton C. Rew, B. S. A., Auburn, Alabama. 

W. C. Scholty, D. V. M., Osage, Iowa. 

H. G. Skinner, B. S. A., Brookings, S. Dakota. 

Arthur C. Slifer, B. S., 856 Fifth Avenue, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Margaret B. Stanton, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

♦Stephen W. Stevens, B. S. 

J. Edgar Stewart, B. C. E., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Walter Stuhr, D. V. M., Douglass & Story Streets, Ames, Iowa. 
C. W. Warburton, B. S. A., U. S. Dept. of Agri., Washington, D. C. 
Frank M. Weakley, B. S. in Min. E., care Penn. R. R., Altoona, Pa. 
Chas. Welsh, B. C. E., 272 Beldin Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Arthur L. Wood, D. V. M., Hampton, Iowa. 

GBADUATES OF 1903. 

G. H. Angier, B. S. A,., Storm Lake, Iowa.* 

Elva Barton, B. S., Lu Verne, Iowa. 

W. R. Battey, B. M. E., Dexter, Iowa. 

Percy Bissell, B. M. E., 144 N. Main St., Waterbury, Connecticut. 
Robt. A. Blair, B. C. E., Bureau Engineer, Manila, Philippine Ids. 
Mae Bower, B. S., West Union, Iowa. 



LIST OF GKADUATES 425 

J. W. Brhel, Jr., 15 East 10th Street, St. Paul, Minnesota. 
J. F. Brown, B. C. E., 9119 Exchange Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 

C. C. Buchanan, B. S. in E. E., Marshalltown, Iowa. 
Josephine Brown, B. S., Gas City, Indiana. 
Paul H. Brown, B. S. A., Vermillion, S. Dakota. 
Leon Buck, B. S., Moulton, Iowa. 

D. J. Butts, B. S. in E. E., 276 S. Leavitt St., Chicago, Illinois.* 
F. M. Byl, B. M. E., 1028 Park Avenue, Beloit, Wisconsin. 
A .B. Chattin, B. C. E., Anthon, Iowa. 

Geo. I. Christie, B. S. A., Station A. Ames, Iowa. 

John C. Cleghorn, B. S. in Min. E., Shelburne, Indiana. 

T. F. Crocker, B. S. in E. E., Ill Loomis St., Chicago, Illinois. 

W. M. Cummins, D. V. M., Milford, Pennsylvania.* 

H. G. Dimmitt, B. M. E., Ottumwa, Iowa.* 

T. W. Dodd, B. C. E., 822 Seventh Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 

H. K. Dodge, B. C. E., 202 Frederick Ave., Sewickley, Penn. 

B. E. Donovan, B. C. E., Waverly, Iowa* 

H. N. Ebersole, B. M. E., 797 Monroe Street, Chicago, Illinois.* 
A. E. Elder, B. S., Allerton, Iowa. 

Porter Eveland, B. S. in E. E., 932 Albany St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
T. T. Fitch, B. C. E., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Estella Fogel, B. S., Station A^ Ames, Iowa. 

Guy S. Gear hart, B. M. E., Fishers Island, New York. 

H. Dana Goss, B. S. in E. E., 333 Pitt St., Wilkinsburg, Penn. 
Nellie Grant, B. S., Rolfe, Iowa. 

Lilian Hanson, B. S., 923 W. 23d Street, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 
W. W. Hendrix, B. C. E., Letts, Iowa.* 

C. A. Hobein, B. S. in E. E., 5151 Maple Avenue, St. Louis, Mo. 
Richard Hopkins, B. C. E., Agricultural College, Michigan. 

E. C. Houck, B. S. in E. E., Browning, Missouri. 
E. R. T. Howard, B. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
Ruthella B. Howe, B. S., 1992 W. Van Buren St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Thos. S. Hunt, B. S. A., Ackley. Iowa. 
Edward A. Hyde, B. S. A., 1840 Summit Ave., Washington, D. C. 
Ira W. Jones, B. S., Allison, Iowa.* 

John S. Jones, B. S. A., R. F. D. No. 7, San Antonio, Texas. 
Geo. P. Kempf, B. Mi. E., 1091 Garfield Ave., Dubuque, Iowa. 
August Landsberg, B. S. in E. E., 797 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111.* 
A. C. Lasher, B. S. in E. E., 333 Pitt Street, Wilkinsburg, Penn. 
W. A. Linklater, B. S. A., Dunlap, Ontario, Canada.* 

Geo. M. Lummis, B. S. A., Pleasant Hill, Missouri. 

Marie Malley, B. S., Marquisville, Iowa.* 

Walter H. Martin, D. V. M., Mitchelville, Iowa. 

Geo. W. Miller, B. C. E., 1515 Center St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Lloyd H. Moore, B. M. E., Abbotsford, Wisconsin. 

O. B. Morehouse, B. M. E., Glidden, Iowa. 

Frank L. McClain, B. S. in E. E., 217 S. 6th St. E., Cedar Rapids,Ia. 
Fay McClure, B. C. E., 116 2d St., S. E., Washington, D. C. 
Effie McKimm, B. S., R. F. D. No. 3, Ames, Iowa. 

J. C. Nelson, B. C. E., 625 Church St., Evanston, Illinois.* 



426 IOWA STATE COLLEGE 

Roy Norman, B. M. E., Omaha, Nebraska. 

C. W. Norton, B. S. A., Wilton Junct, Iowa. 

W. W. Otto, B. S. A., 163 Henry Street, Detroit, Michigan. 
F. E. Overholser, B. S. in E. E., Plattsburg Barracks, Plattsburg, 

New York. 
H. M. Parks, B. S. in Min. E., 647 South Idaho St., Butte, Montana. 
R. E. Peshak, B. S. in E. E., 5647 Cates Ave., St. Louis, Missouri. 
Bertha Pierce, B. S., Perry, Iowa. 

Frank A. Rew, B. S. in E. E., 333 Pitts St., Wilkensburg, Penn. 
M. C. Reynolds, B. S. in E. E., 797 Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois.* 
E. G. Ritzman, B. S. A., Dept. of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 
C. W. Roland, B. C. E., Adel, Iowa. 

M. Rosenberger, D. V. M., Mitchellville, Iowa.* 

Oscar Royce, B. S. A., Ames, Iowa.* 

H. O. Sampson, B. S., Waterford, Pennsylvania. 

A. S. Shealy, D. V. M., Conrad, • Iowa. 
W. W;. Smith, B. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Nina (Starr) Hutchison, B. S., 450 21st St., San Diego, California. 
Otto Starzinger, B. S. in E. E., 773 State St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
C. H. Streeter, B. C. E., Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Harry L. Tillson, B. S. in E. E., 621 Tama Street, Boone, Iowa. 
Maude Vanatta, B. S., Newton, Iowa.* 

Hugh G. Van Pelt, B. S. A., 1220 12th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
H. I. Waggoner, B. S. in E. E., 601 Sixth Ave., Peoria, Illinois. 
J. C. Wall, B. S. A., Ankeny, Iowa.* 

B. Arthur Whisler, B. S. in E. E., 13 Eagle St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
W. J. Wilson, B. S. A., Earlham, Iowa.* 
Ethyln (Younie) Weston, B. S., Antwerp, New York. 

GKADTJATES OF 1904. 

Raymond M. Alvord, B. S. in E. E., 332 Germania Ave., 

Schenectady, New York. 
Harriett Anderson, B. S., Woodward, Iowa. 

Isaac Anderson, B. S. in E. E., 285 Donald St., Winnipeg, 

Manitoba, Canada. 
Ed. V. Andrews, B. M. E., 123 N. 5th St., E., Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
Alfred Atkinson, B. S. a., Experiment Station, Bozeman, Montana. 
Harry D. Austin, B. S. in E. E., Prattsburg, New York.* 
Roy G. Austin, B. C. E., Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 

C. E. Bartholomew, B. S., 812 Burnett St., Ames, Iowa. 
Wm. A. Bevan, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
H. F. Bishop, B. M. E., Nadiad, India. 
Walter C. Bishop, B. M. E., Millersburg, Iowa. 
Theo. B. Borsheim, B. M. E., St. Ansgar, Iowa.* 

Wm. I. Brock, B. S. in E. E., 497 Oakland Ave., Milwaukee, Wis.* 
Frank L. Brown, B. C. E., 3717 Fourth Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Nellie Brown, B. S., Dexter, Iowa. 

O. L. Brown, B. C. E., Garner, Iowa.* 

Henry J. Brunnier, B. C. E., Box 111, Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 



LIST OF GEADUATES 427 

Eugene H. Bruntlett, B. C. E., Cape May, New Jersey. 
R. E. Buchanan, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

A. R. Buckley, B. S. in E. E., Shelby, Iowa.* 

J. H. Burton, B. M. E., 142 Garfield Ave., Galesburg, Illinois. 
Claude V. Campbell, B. S., Webster City, Iowa. 

Ethyl Cessna, B. S., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Bernice Corlette, B. S., 1106 Clarke Street, Ames, Iowa. 
Glen H. Corlette, B. M. E., 1106 Clarke Street, Ames. 
Ernest Cotton, B. C. E., F. E. C. Ry., Miami, Florida. 
F. H. Crouse, B. S. A., Dike, Iowa. 

Gertrude Curtiss, B. S., Nevada, Iowa. 

Harry G. Danforth, B. S. A., Wimbledon, N. Dakota. 
Wayne Dinsmore, B. S. A., Station A., Ames. Iowa. 

C. O. Dixon, B. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

I. A. Dreher, B. M. E., 1028 Park Avenue, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

D. W. Eiler, B. S. A., Sioux Rapids, Iowa. 
Arthur L. Evans, B. S. in E. E., 416 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
J. H. Garberson, B. S., 2414 Prairie Avenue, Chicago, Illinois. 
Lawrence T. Gaylord, B. C. E., 6 East Bay St., Savannah, Georgia. 
Edward C. Gersbach, B. C. E., American Bridge Co., 

Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 
Ralph Graham, D. V. M., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Charles Gray, B. S. A., 17 Exchange Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Fred Hamerly, B. M. E., West Allis, Wisconsin. 

Fred N. Hansen, B. S. A. , Jefferson, Iowa. 

Park H. Haselton, B. S. in E. E., 13 Eagle St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Mark Havenhill, B. S. A., Fox, Illinois. 

A. C. Holden, B. S. in E. E., Office Sig. Eng., U. P. R'y, Omaha, Neb. 
Leslie M. Hurt, D. V. M., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 
W. A. Ireland, B. S. in E. E., 1203 Esplanade St., Allegheny, Pa. 
John W. Jordan, B. S., Delta Tau Delta House, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Edna L. King, B. S., Osceola, Nebraska. 

Eva B. Kingkade, B. S., 101 Boone St., Ames, Iowa. 
H. H. Knowles, B. S., in Min. E., Kingsley, Iowa.* 

E. V. Larson, B. S., 1005 N. Univ. Ave., Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
Geo. V. Leffler, B. S. A., R. F. D. No. 1, Stockport, Illionois. 

Otis B. Lofstedt, B. C. E., Rippey, Iowa. 

L. L. Lyford, B. C. E., Freeport, Iowa. 

T. H. MacDonald, B. C. E., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

Fred H. Marsh, B. C. E., 302 Third Avenue, Clinton, Iowa. 

F. G. Matthews, D. V. M., Morrison, Tennessee.* 

G. N. Mereness, B. S. in E. E., 416 7th Avenue, Pittsburg, Penn. 
M. L. Merritt, B. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

A. A. Miller, B. S. A., R. F. D. No 1, Ogden, Iowa. 

Oliver H. Miller, B. S., 610 Youngerman Block, Des Moines, Iowa. 
T. R. Minert, B. M. E., South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
R. H. Moffett, B. S. in Min. E., 710 18th St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Leslie C. Moody, B. M. E., 358 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
Lester Morris, B. C. E., Bureau of Engineering, Manila, P. I. 
Rachel L. Mosier, B. S., Box 633, Des Moines, Iowa. 



428 LIST OF GEADUATES 

Will S. Munro, B. S. in E. E., 808 W. Monroe St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Robt. F. McKinney, B. S. in E. E., 13 Eagle St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Roscoe McMillan, B. S. in E. E., 2289 W. Congress St., Chicago, 111. 
R. B. Newcom, B. S., Odebolt, Iowa. 

J. L. O'Hearn, B. C. E., Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 

Frank M. Okey, B. C. E., 704 Center Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 
Webb H. Otis, B. M. E., 444 Massachusetts Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Alice (Overholser) Havenhill, B. S., Fox, Illinois. 

P. C. Parks, B. S. A., Tuskegee, Alabama. 

E. C. Peterson, B. S. in E. E., 6605 Ellis Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Geo. V. Pew, B. M. E., Le Mars, Iowa. 

Paul D. Phillips, B. M. E., 13 Eagle St., Schenectady, New York. 

F. A. Pielsticker, B. S. in E. E., 1007 Market St., St. Louis, Mo. 
L. S. Poage, B. M. E., 344 Washington St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
C. A. Rapp, D. V. M., Sioux City, B. A. I., Iowa. 
Homer W. Reed, B. S. in E. E., 1218 Walker St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Ellison L. Ross, B. S., Sutherland, Iowa.* 
Clarence J. Roup, B. S., 860 16th Ave. S. E., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Jas. A. Rowat, B. C. E., 1117 Walker St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
Louise Rowe, B. S., 321 Boone St., Boone, Iowa. 

C. W. Rubel, B. S. A., Station A., Ames, Iowa. 

H. O. Sampson, B. S. A., Waterford, Pennsylvania. 

C. O. Schooley, B. S. in E. E., 706 N. Alabama St., Indianapolis, 

Indiana. 
A. H. Scott, B. S. in E. E., 816 Holland Ave., Wilkinsburg, Penn. 
Harold L. Scranton, B. S. in E. E., Gilmore City, Iowa.* 
J. O. Shaft, B. S. A., Folletts, Iowa. 

D. D. Sheldon, B. S. A., 676 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, Illinois. 
C. E. Shipman, B. C. E., Ambridge, Pennsylvania. 
Earl O. Shreve, B. S. in E. E., 791 State St., Schenectady, N. Y. 

C. Dean Simpson, B. M. E., 1028 Park Ave., Beloit, Wisconsin. 
Bird Slater, B. S., Ames, Iowa. 

A. J. Smith, B. S. in E. E., 124 Loomis St., Chicago, Illinois. 
Clyde W. Smith, B. S. in Min.E., Guanicevi, State of Durango, Mex. 

E. P. Spalding, B. S. in E. E., 816 Holland Ave., Wilkinsburg, Pa. 
Arthur B. Sperry, B. S. in E. E., 416 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
Nettie Starr, B. S., Mexico, Missouri. 
Otto Starzinger, B. S. in E. E., 773 State St., Schenectady, N. Y. 
Edith L. Stevens, B. S., 728 Linn St., Boone, Iowa. 

Wm. D. Sumner, B. S. in E. E., Gen. Foreman Tele., Decatur, III. 
Laura M. Taggart, B. S., Liscomb, Iowa. 

H. O. Tellier, B. S. A., 6021 Calumet Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
Edgar L. Tenney, B. M. E., 791 State St., Schenectady, New York. 
Katharine Terrill, B. S., Grand Jet., Iowa. 

D. C. Thomas, B. M. E., 600 Taylor St., Charles City, Iowa. 
Chas. L. Tibbits, B. S. in E. E., Port Laraca, Texas. 
Gonzalo S. Torres, B. S. A,. Honda No. 2, Leon, Guanajuato, Mex. 
Carl H. Tourgee, B. S. A., Ida Grove, Iowa. 
Ricardo B. Ulibarri, B. S. A., Pacheos 63, Leon, Guanajuato, Mex. 
Eldon L. Usry, B. M. E., 744 W. 18th Street, Des Moines, Iowa. 



LIST OF GKADTJATES 429 

Pearle (Johnson) Van Houten, B. S., Nevada, Iowa. 
C. G. Waggoner, B. S. in E. E., 133 Emerson Ave., Chicago, Illinois. 
J. Q. Wickham, B. C. E., Ames, iowa. 

Harold R. Williams, B. S. A., Grand View, Iowa. 
Clinton B. Wilson, B. C. E., Miami, Florida. 



INDEX 



Accredited High Schools 44 

Admission to the College 32 

Advanced Standing, Admission 

to 56 

Agricultural Experiment Station 

Staff . 16 

Agronomy, Courses in 66 

Agronomy, Department of 65 

Agriculture, Division of 63 

Agriculture, Graduate Courses in .142 
Agronomy, Post Graduate Work 

in 81 

Alumni, List of 395 

Ames and the College 23 

Animal Husbandry, Course in. -.110 
Animal Husbandry, Department 

Of 104 

Animal Husbandry, Graduate 

Courses in- 108 

Buildings 24 

Botany, Course in 299 

Botany, Department of 297 

Botany, Post Graduate Courses 

in .305 

Calendar 3 

Ceramics, Course in 245 

Chemistry, Agricultural 294 

Chemistry, Agricultural, Work 

in 296 

Chemistry, General and Applied, 

Course in ... 290 

Chemistry, General and Applied, 

Departmentof 286 

Christian Associations 52 

Civics, Department of 342 

Civil Engineering, Course in 218 

Civil Engineering, Department 

of 201 

Classification Regulations 55 

Corn and Grain Judging, Short 

Course in 87 

Dairying, Course in.. _ 90 

Dairying, Department of 87 

Dairying, Short Course in 99 

Dairying, Graduate Course in..:. 101 

Degrees 53 

Domestic Science, Course in 271 

Domestic Science, Department 

of 315 

Engineering, Division of- 182 

Economic Science, Department 

Of 314 

Electrical Engineering, Depart- 
ment of 221 

Electrical Engineering, Course 

in 228 

English. Department of 323 

Entrance Requirements. 37 

Expenses, Students' 48 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 145 
Experiment Station Staff, Agri- 
cultural — - 16 

Experiment Station, Engineer- 
ing 247 



Experiment Station Staff, Engi- 
neering 18 

Faculty, General 9 

Faculty in Agriculture 60 

Faculty in Engineering 178 

Faculty in Science 256 

Faculty in Veterinary Science... 152 

Fees 48 

Forestry, Courses in 126 

Geology, Department of 310 

Good Roads Investigation 253 

Good Roads, Schooi of 253 

Government 52 

Grounds 28 

Historical 20 

History, Department of 338 

Horticulture, Course in. 119 

Horticulture and Forestry, De- 
partment of - 117 

Horticulture and Forestry, Grad- 
uate Work in 127 

Hospital, College 49 

Labor, Manual 51 

Languages, Modern, Department 

of 336 

Library, The 346 

Literary Societies 53 

Literature and Rhetoric, Depart- 
ment of 323 

Margaret Hall 28 

Master's Degree 57 

Mathematics, Department of 274 

Mechanical Engineering, Course 

in 198 

Mechanical Engineering, De- 
partment of ...188 

Military Science and Tactics 345 

Mining Engineering, Course in.. 240 
Mining Engineering, Depart- 
ment of 231 

Music, Departmentof- — 347 

Physical Culture for Women 335 

Physics, Department of 281 

Post Graduate Courses 56 

Psychology, Department of 323 

Public Speaking, Department of-329 

Religious Exercises 52 

Science, Course in 261 

Science, Division of 255 

Science and Agriculture, Courses 

in 130 

Science, General and Domestic, 

Course in -. 266 

Special Courses 54 

Stock Judging, Winter Course in .107 

Students, List of 351 

Theses, Graduating 56 

Trustees, Board of 6 

Veterinary Science, Course in ... 157 
Veterinary Science, Division of.. 151 
Veterinary Science, Division Re- 
quirements for Admission to.155 
Zoology, Department of 306 






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